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Re: Some more words

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  • tungol65
    ... The DE, SV & DN refer to the Virgin Mary. The EN to Our Lady in the sense of the Virgin Mary. ... NL ... OK didn t realise that. A FS word like SORGEN
    Message 1 of 105 , May 1, 2005
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      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@x> wrote:
      > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "tungol65" <rdw.young@n...>
      wrote:
      > > A few more words. I've used the following orthography.
      > >
      > > a = /a/ or /A/ (I tend to render this a bit like /V/)
      > > aa = /a:/ or /A:/
      > > e = /e/ or /E/
      > > ee = /e:/ or /E:/
      > > i = /I/
      > > ie = /i:/
      > > o = /Q/ or /O/
      > > oo = /o:/
      > > u = /U/ or /u/
      > > ou = /u:/
      > > h = /x/ or /C/
      > > z = /z/
      > >
      > > LOODREHT, VERTIKAL
      > > a. = vertical
      > > NL verticaal, loodrecht, DE senkrecht, vertikal, SV lodrät, DN
      > > lodret, vertikal
      > >
      > > (LOOD) would be my word for lead aswell.
      > >
      > "Lead-right". It's reasonably self-explanitory I suppose.
      >
      >
      >
      > > HORIZONTAL, VATERREHT (a bit more poetic)
      > > a. = horizontal
      > > NL horizontaal, DE horizontal, SV horisont-, vågrät, DN
      > horisontal,
      > > vandret.
      > >
      > > ADVARS
      > > prep. = across, athwart
      > > NL dwars over, DE , SV [tvärs] over, DN på tværs
      > >
      > > MARIEKEEFER
      > > n. = ladybird, ladybug
      > > NL lievenheers-beestje, DE Marienkäfer, SV [Marie] nyckelpiga,
      > DN
      > > mariehøne
      >
      > I suppost some sort of lady's name is appropriate here.

      The DE, SV & DN refer to the Virgin Mary. The EN to Our Lady in the
      sense of the Virgin Mary.

      > > TROUREN
      > > v. = to mourn
      > > NL treuren, DE trauern, SV sörja, DN sørge
      > >
      > > The SV & DN are cognates with EN sorrow. We could have FS SORGEN,
      > to
      > > grieve, to regret
      >
      > Not so sure about that. There are related words in DE (sorgen) and
      NL
      > (zorgen) that mean to care or to worry.SV "sörja för" also
      > means this.
      > The English word "dreary" is related to the DE traurig and to the DE
      > treuern. The NL word is probably related but it seems to have
      > undergone a High German consonant shift (which means it could be a
      > High German borrowing)

      OK didn't realise that. A FS word like SORGEN would be good then,
      meaning 'to worry about, to care for'

      > > NUTTIG
      > > a. = useful
      > > NL nuttig, DE nützlich, SV nyttig, DN nyttig
      > >
      > > BEVUSTLOS
      > > a. = unconscious
      > > NL bewusteloos, DE bewußtlos, SV medvetslös, DN bevidstløs
      > >
      > > TANG
      > > n. = seaweed, tang
      > > NL zeewier, DE Seetang, SV tång, DN tang
      >
      > Tang is an English word? I guess it's in the dictionary, but I've
      > never heard of it. The OED says its chiefly Scots.

      In northern dialects it is a general term for seaweed, in southern
      dialects I think it refers to a specific type.

      > > BELAAHLIK
      > > a. = ridiculous, laughable
      > > NL belachelijk, DE lächerlich, SV löjlig, DN laterlig
      > >
      > > FERDRAAGSAM, TOLERANT
      > > a. = tolerant
      > > NL verdraagzaam, DE tolerant, SV fördragsam, DN fordragelig,
      > tolerent
      > >
      > > FUST
      > > n. = fist
      > > NL vuist, DE Faust, SV [knyt]näve, DN næve
      > >
      > > (Scots has neive from ON)
      >
      > Should have a long U or a dipthong methinks.

      I can live with FOUST or FAUST, FUST just seemed to roll off the
      tongue easier for me.

      > > STEM
      > > n. = voice
      > > NL stem, DE Stimme, SV stämme, röst, DNstemme, røst
      >
      > This should perhaps also mean "vote"

      I agree.

      > > Any ideas for the following?
      > >
      > > ?
      > > v. = kick
      > > NL trappen, DE tretten, SV sparka, sparke
      >
      > "mid ðe fout slaje". Doesn't exactly roll off the tongue and
      > wouldn't
      > be much good for commentating soccer matches.
      >
      > >
      > > ?
      > > a. = nasty, obscene
      > > NL gemeen, DE gemein, SV smutsig, DN væmmelig

      SV smutsig, seems cognate with EN smutty, and related to DE Schmutz.
      How about a FS word SMUTTIG or SMUTSIG 'smutty, risqué' (I think I've
      seen something like this suggested before).

      > OBSCEN
      > a. = obscene, immoral, lack of moral, cunning, vulgar
      > cf EN obscenre, NL obsceen, DE obszön, SV obscen, IL obscen
      >
      > SLIPPERIG
      > a. = slippery, greasy, slithery, obscene, indecent
      > cf EN slippery, NL slipgevaarlijk, DE schlüpfrig, SV slipprig
      >
      > NL gemeen also means common, collective or communal. DE gemeinsam
      > means this also. Also SV gemensam. They are cognate to EN mean which
      > had orriginally a meaning of common.
      > Such usages probably date back to the time when peasants were
      regarded
      > as inferior scum. cf the English word "villain" came from a word for
      > peasant.
      >
      >
      > So it looks like we need a way of distinguishing the terms
      > GEMEIN should mean nasty, GEMEINSAM should mean common
      >
      > GEMEIN
      > a. = mean, bad, base, common, cunning, malicious, nasty, shrewd,
      > slippery, sly, underhand, vicious, vile, villainous, false
      > cf EN mean, NL gemeen, DE gemein, SV gemen

      I'd include vulgar here to.

      > GEMEINSAM
      > a. = common, communal, joint, collective
      > cf NL gemeen, gemeenzaam, gemeenschappelijk, DE gemeinsam,
      > gemeinschaftlich, SV gemensam.
    • David Parke
      ... Sorry, it would have been helpful for me to put the link in that last post, i suppose: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pieial/
      Message 105 of 105 , Jul 26, 2005
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        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran" <hakans@w...> wrote:
        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@x> wrote:
        > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@x> wrote:
        > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran"
        > <hakans@w...>
        > > wrote:
        > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran"
        > <hakans@w...>
        > > > > wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > As I have said before, I doubt that PIE words would be easy
        > to
        > > > > > recognize, even if the modern words have developed from
        > them... Or
        > > > > > what do you think of these examples of stories in
        > reconstructed PIE
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > P.S. What I would want to see is a English-*PIE wordlist,
        > sorted on
        > > > > topic etc.
        > > > >
        > > > > Also, with information about if the root could be found native
        > in the
        > > > > different core language groups in their original stages(I.E.
        > not
        > > > > borrowed).
        > > > >
        > > > > Italic, Baltic, Slavic, Germanic, Celtic, Greek,
        > Indic/Iranian,
        > > > > Armenian, Albanian, Tocharian, Anatolian
        > > > >
        > > > > Some roots would probably be found in nearly all groups,
        > whereas
        > > > > others more obscure(could be noted) in only two or three, with
        > > unclear
        > > > > connections.
        > > >
        > > > There are some words in Germanic langs that don't appear in
        > other IE
        > > > langs. It is theorised that these are borrowings from pre-IE
        > people
        > > > who were the origianl inhabitants of the germanic lands.
        > > > The alternate theory is some of them are IE words that have only
        > > > survived in the Germlangs. That is the IE word died out in other
        > IE
        > > > dialects. Neither theories are provable.
        > >
        > > Right now if I were the moderator of this group, I would be
        > butting in
        > > and suggesting that those interested in this topic join Roly's
        > group
        > > and keep the FS group on topic. But I ain't the moderator so do as
        > you
        > > will. I have already just joined Roly's group BTW.
        >
        > How and where can I find Roly's group?

        Sorry, it would have been helpful for me to put the link in that last
        post, i suppose:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pieial/
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