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Re: [folkspraak] Re: Mega-Post 239 words

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  • Roly Sookias
    ... Well I merge them both to d or t depending on the same rules basically - tenk , ting , dem , dus - and I m really dead set against having [T] and
    Message 1 of 35 , Jan 8, 2005
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      wakuran_wakaran wrote:

      >>Hm. Having /T/ seems bloody stupid as no-one can say it apart from
      >>
      >>
      >Englanders and Icelanders and even some fairly prominent varieties
      >of English don't have it!
      >
      >
      >I have the Thorn letter/ /T/ sound at the beginning of words that
      >have "th" /T/ at the beginning in english, and generally "t" /t/ in
      >scandinavian, (unless they were borrowed from german variants...)
      >
      >/Tenk/ /Ting/ /To:rn/ (Think, Thing, Thorn)
      >
      >The Edh(or "Dje") letter is used in the middle and at the end of
      >words, and for words being used in a more grammatical/descriptive
      >manner...
      >
      >/DoC/ /De/ /DeI/ /Dem/ (Though, The, They, Them)
      >
      >This could possibly be too complicated, though, and maybe I would
      >follow Parked's usage to merge them both into /D/...
      >
      >
      Well I merge them both to 'd' or 't' depending on the same rules
      basically - 'tenk', 'ting', 'dem', 'dus' - and I'm really dead set
      against having [T] and [D] ever unless everyone who speaks languages
      where they don't ahve them says they're really easy to say (which i
      doubt very much'll happen!).

      >
      >>Yeah, looks better, but why not use 'ai'? A circumflex also can't
      >>
      >>
      >be typed on a standard UK or US keyboard without remapping or such.
      >
      >
      >
      >That's a problem... There are several aspects to think of here...
      >The ortography should, at best, be both easy to read and type,
      >unambiguous concerning stress and pronunciation, and giving helpful
      >hints about etymology. This could be difficult to accomplish
      >correctly...
      >
      >
      Well etymology's hardly a problem except for borrowed words, and I don't
      think an orthography should revolve a very small minority of words
      should it!? Apart from etymology, my orthography I think covers the
      other criteria fine.

      >
      >>Hm. Surely /i:/ would do wouldn't it? I mean having /y:/ isn't
      >>
      >>
      >going to make words any more recognisable is it? ...and indeed it
      >might make them less so for English speakers (not to mention much
      >harder to say, but that dosn't seem to be a great issue on your
      >agenda, so I won't go on about that!)
      >
      >I have thought about that, too...
      >(In danish and norwegian bokmål, I believe Animal/Expensive are
      >homonyms, Dyr/Dyr, while in swedish, they are not, Djur/Dyr.
      >I have read a silly pun in a norwegian joke "Rådyr" could mean
      >both "Roe deer", and "Raw expensive", (Raw in this sense is a common
      >intensifier in swedish and norwegian.) )
      >If the sound system is smaller, there is a bigger risk of homonyms.
      >If it is larger, it could be more difficult to pronounce...
      >
      >
      Yeah, of course that's true. Well, I spose as German, Swedish and Dutch
      all have /y/ and /y:/ phonemes, maybe FS should too? I did originally
      have these phonemes actually but dropped them in rather a moment of
      Anglo-centricism!

      >>Yeah, well that seems fairly logical and eliminates the diaresis.
      >>
      >>
      >As I said I'd use 'ai' for /ai/ tho. I think if you have /y:/ you
      >should have /y/ ([Y] probably).
      >
      >
      >Like in greek words(?): Syndikát, Syntétisc, Synkopí etc...
      >
      >As I have said before, I don't differ between open and closed vowels
      >in my version. Personally, I think it's difficult...
      >
      >
      Sorry, I need to clarify. I was meaning it could be said [y] or [Y], but
      the latter would prob. be more common. As for whether it's be in Greek
      words all I can say is we don't have [p_h] in FS and I don't think you
      have [x] (you have [C] instead yeah?) in DS, so we don't need /y/ for
      Greek words, although if we have it we should use it.
    • Aron Boström
      ... And stationshall , ishall , spelhall , lagerhall , ... In modern SE -hall can mean a large indoor space only if joined with another word. Hall
      Message 35 of 35 , Jan 14, 2005
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        torsdagen den 13 januari 2005 22:01 skrev Sebastian:
        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran" <hakans@w...>
        >
        > wrote:
        > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Paul Leyland <pcl@w...> wrote:
        > > > On Wed, 2005-01-05 at 11:10, parked71 wrote:
        > > > > This is all I've achieved over my holiday break. I hope you
        >
        > find
        >
        > > some
        > >
        > > > > useful additions to your dictionaries somewhere amongst these
        > >
        > > words.
        > >
        > > > > aula n. = auditorium, music hall, concert hall.
        > > >
        > > > This one has been borrowed unchanged from the Latin.
        > > >
        > > > What's wrong with "hall" and its cognates?
        > > >
        > > > English: Hall
        > > > Dutch: Hal
        > > > German: Halle
        > > > Swedish: Hall
        > > > OE: Hall or Heall
        > > > OHG: Halle
        > > > ON: Höll
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Those are just the ones I know off the top of my head or can find
        > > > easily. No doubt there are those who know Danish, Norwegian,
        > >
        > > Yiddish,
        > >
        > > > etc, who can fill in the gaps.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Paul
        > >
        > > I don't think the swedish word means "aula", generally,
        > > rather "hallway"...
        >
        > don't forget idrottshall e.g (sporthall)

        And "stationshall", "ishall", "spelhall", "lagerhall", ...

        In modern SE -hall can mean "a large indoor space" only if joined with another
        word. "Hall" itself as a large indoor space is archaic.

        Aron (Yes, I'm still alive)
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