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Sandwich

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  • parked71
    One the great British gifts to the world. Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT variations on sandwich ? BTW, the swedish word sandvik had me
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
      One the great British gifts to the world.

      Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT variations on
      "sandwich"?

      BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in laughter.
      It never occured to me, that translating the name would make it
      somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.


      I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak. Perhaps
      pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even /sandvik/. It
      depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
    • Aron Boström
      Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word smörmad (or elder fittamad , or simply mad ) is allways translated into sandwich . SCY
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
        Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word "smörmad" (or elder
        "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into "sandwich".

        SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate of smear I think)
        and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".

        Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of some kind
        (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern times) some marmelade,
        jam, hunny or cheese on top.

        The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the danish equivalent
        is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they are pretty much
        variations of the same concept.

        Aron

        fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
        > One the great British gifts to the world.
        >
        > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT variations on
        > "sandwich"?
        >
        > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in laughter.
        > It never occured to me, that translating the name would make it
        > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
        >
        >
        > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak. Perhaps
        > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even /sandvik/. It
        > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Browse the draft word lists!
        > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
        > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
        >
        > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
        > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • parked71
        I vaguely remember that Dutch has butterbrood but it s not in any of the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That s the same literal
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
          I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in any of
          the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That's
          the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
          are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
          On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
          context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more layers
          of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
          "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other words.
          Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for food?

          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
          > Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word
          "smörmad"
          (or elder
          > "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into "sandwich".
          >
          > SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate
          of smear
          I think)
          > and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".
          >
          > Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of some
          kind
          > (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern times) some
          marmelade,
          > jam, hunny or cheese on top.
          >
          > The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the
          danish
          equivalent
          > is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they
          are
          pretty much
          > variations of the same concept.
          >
          > Aron
          >
          > fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
          > > One the great British gifts to the world.
          > >
          > > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT variations on
          > > "sandwich"?
          > >
          > > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in
          laughter.
          > > It never occured to me, that translating the name would make it
          > > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
          > >
          > >
          > > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak. Perhaps
          > > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even
          /sandvik/. It
          > > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Browse the draft word lists!
          > > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
          > > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
          > >
          > > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
          > > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
        • Jan-Willem Benjamins
          I m sorry but I have never heard of butterbrood . We do have boterham , which is a slice of bread, with or without something on it. Interestingly enough,
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
            I'm sorry but I have never heard of "butterbrood". We do have
            "boterham", which is a slice of bread, with or without something on it.

            Interestingly enough, buterbrod does exist in Russian, meaning
            sandwich. My guess is that it's a loan from german, or possibly
            low-german.

            Jan-Willem

            --- parked71 <parked@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in any
            > of
            > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That's
            > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
            > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
            > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
            > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more
            > layers
            > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
            > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other words.
            > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for food?




            ___________________________________________________________
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          • Aron Boström
            ... Yes, I am sure, there are two R s in smørre-. ... SV uses the sandwich as a borrowing in some of theese places. ( Sandwichgubbe = Sandwich man, a
            Message 5 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
              freidag 3 december 2004 10:11 skreb parked71:
              > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in any of
              > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That's
              > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
              > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)

              Yes, I am sure, there are two R's in smørre-.

              > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
              > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more layers
              > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
              > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other words.
              > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for food?

              SV uses the "sandwich" as a borrowing in some of theese places.
              ("Sandwichgubbe" = Sandwich man, a walking person with commercial signs in
              front of and behind him.)

              Also, there is SV macka, a synonym of SV smörgås. There is a related word SV
              dubbelmacka which is sometimes used as a synonym of things containing of
              something in the middle of two other things (such as a threesome, a CD in a
              CD case, a letter in a folder, ...). I would characterise this as frequent
              though.

              Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka" which I'm not
              quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of sandwhich with 7-8
              "layers" of bread.

              Aron

              > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
              > > Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word
              >
              > "smörmad"
              > (or elder
              >
              > > "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into "sandwich".
              > >
              > > SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate
              >
              > of smear
              > I think)
              >
              > > and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".
              > >
              > > Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of some
              >
              > kind
              >
              > > (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern times) some
              >
              > marmelade,
              >
              > > jam, hunny or cheese on top.
              > >
              > > The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the
              >
              > danish
              > equivalent
              >
              > > is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they
              >
              > are
              > pretty much
              >
              > > variations of the same concept.
              > >
              > > Aron
              > >
              > > fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
              > > > One the great British gifts to the world.
              > > >
              > > > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT variations on
              > > > "sandwich"?
              > > >
              > > > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in
              >
              > laughter.
              >
              > > > It never occured to me, that translating the name would make it
              > > > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak. Perhaps
              > > > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even
              >
              > /sandvik/. It
              >
              > > > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
              > > >
              > > >
            • parked71
              Apologies for that, I ve now located Butterbrot in my German dictionary. I was actually reminded of it when Websters Online Dictionary came up with
              Message 6 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                Apologies for that, I've now located "Butterbrot" in my German
                dictionary. I was actually reminded of it when Websters Online
                Dictionary came up with "Buterbrod" in Ukrainean and Turkmen.



                --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                <benjaminsjw@y...> wrote:
                > I'm sorry but I have never heard of "butterbrood". We do have
                > "boterham", which is a slice of bread, with or without something on it.
                >
                > Interestingly enough, buterbrod does exist in Russian, meaning
                > sandwich. My guess is that it's a loan from german, or possibly
                > low-german.
                >
                > Jan-Willem
                >
                > --- parked71 <parked@x...> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in any
                > > of
                > > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That's
                > > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
                > > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)

                And sorry to have doubted you Aron. It seemed logical to me that is
                Swedish and Scanian had only one "r" then so would Danish. Just goes
                to show that you shouldn't make assumptions from a position of ignorance.

                BTW I had heard of "smörgås". Strangely enough, translating it into
                "smear-goose" doesn't make it's meaning any more obvious :-)





                > > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
                > > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more
                > > layers
                > > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
                > > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other words.
                > > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for food?
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ___________________________________________________________
                > Win a castle for NYE with your mates and Yahoo! Messenger
                > http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
              • parked71
                ... any of ... That s ... layers ... words. ... food? ... signs in ... related word SV ... containing of ... CD in a ... frequent ... which I m not ... with
                Message 7 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                  --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                  > freidag 3 december 2004 10:11 skreb parked71:
                  > > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in
                  any of
                  > > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment.
                  That's
                  > > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
                  > > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
                  >
                  > Yes, I am sure, there are two R's in smørre-.
                  >
                  > > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
                  > > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more
                  layers
                  > > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
                  > > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other
                  words.
                  > > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for
                  food?
                  >
                  > SV uses the "sandwich" as a borrowing in some of theese places.
                  > ("Sandwichgubbe" = Sandwich man, a walking person with commercial
                  signs in
                  > front of and behind him.)
                  >
                  > Also, there is SV macka, a synonym of SV smörgås. There is a
                  related
                  word SV
                  > dubbelmacka which is sometimes used as a synonym of things
                  containing of
                  > something in the middle of two other things (such as a threesome, a
                  CD in a
                  > CD case, a letter in a folder, ...). I would characterise this as
                  frequent
                  > though.
                  >
                  > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                  which I'm not
                  > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of sandwhich
                  with 7-8
                  > "layers" of bread.
                  >

                  That takes me way back to my childhood. Perhaps 25 years ago, I was at
                  a primary school which, in an effort to encourage the children to eat
                  a healthier diet, introduced us to "Dagwood" sandwiches. It was so
                  long ago I don't recall correctly. It MIGHT have been "Dagbert" or
                  "Dagobert". It was definitely some word starting with "Dag". It was a
                  sandwich with several layers of fillings. And we as children were
                  encouraged to make it ourselves. Which led to some unlikely
                  conbinations such as salami,egg, nutella and marmalade.
                • Jan-Willem Benjamins
                  ... That makes sense... Are we all familiar with the comic strip Blondie ? Her husband Dagwood (Dagobert in Sweden), frequently prepares humongous
                  Message 8 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                    > --- parked71 <parked@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                    > > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                    > which I'm not
                    > > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of
                    > sandwhich
                    > with 7-8
                    > > "layers" of bread.
                    > >
                    >
                    > That takes me way back to my childhood. Perhaps 25 years ago, I was
                    > at
                    > a primary school which, in an effort to encourage the children to eat
                    > a healthier diet, introduced us to "Dagwood" sandwiches. It was so
                    > long ago I don't recall correctly. It MIGHT have been "Dagbert" or
                    > "Dagobert". It was definitely some word starting with "Dag". It was a
                    > sandwich with several layers of fillings. And we as children were
                    > encouraged to make it ourselves. Which led to some unlikely
                    > conbinations such as salami,egg, nutella and marmalade.

                    That makes sense... Are we all familiar with the comic strip "Blondie"?
                    Her husband Dagwood (Dagobert in Sweden), frequently prepares humongous
                    multi-layered sandwiches.

                    Jan-Willem




                    ___________________________________________________________
                    Win a castle for NYE with your mates and Yahoo! Messenger
                    http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
                  • parked71
                    ... sandwhich ... at ... eat ... a ... And from the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary: Dagwood / dagwUd/ n. N. Amer.L20. [Dagwood Bumstead, comic-strip
                    Message 9 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                      > >
                      > > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                      > which I'm not
                      > > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of
                      sandwhich
                      > with 7-8
                      > > "layers" of bread.
                      > >
                      >
                      > That takes me way back to my childhood. Perhaps 25 years ago, I was
                      at
                      > a primary school which, in an effort to encourage the children to
                      eat
                      > a healthier diet, introduced us to "Dagwood" sandwiches. It was so
                      > long ago I don't recall correctly. It MIGHT have been "Dagbert" or
                      > "Dagobert". It was definitely some word starting with "Dag". It was
                      a
                      > sandwich with several layers of fillings. And we as children were
                      > encouraged to make it ourselves. Which led to some unlikely
                      > conbinations such as salami,egg, nutella and marmalade.

                      And from the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary:

                      Dagwood /"dagwUd/ n.
                      N. Amer.L20. [Dagwood Bumstead, comic-strip character who makes and
                      eats such sandwiches.]
                      In full Dagwood sandwich. A thick sandwich filled with mixed meats and
                      cheeses with a variety of seasonings and dressings.
                    • wakuran_wakaran
                      ... (or elder ... Ah, sheesh, I don t get enough fittamad ... ^^ ... I think) ... kind ... marmelade, ... equivalent ... pretty much ... laughter.
                      Message 10 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                        > Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word "smörmad"
                        (or elder
                        > "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into "sandwich".
                        >
                        Ah, sheesh, I don't get enough "fittamad"... ^^

                        > SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate of smear
                        I think)
                        > and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".
                        >
                        > Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of some
                        kind
                        > (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern times) some
                        marmelade,
                        > jam, hunny or cheese on top.
                        >
                        > The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the danish
                        equivalent
                        > is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they are
                        pretty much
                        > variations of the same concept.
                        >
                        > Aron
                        >
                        > fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
                        > > One the great British gifts to the world.
                        > >
                        > > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT variations on
                        > > "sandwich"?
                        > >
                        > > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in
                        laughter.
                        > > It never occured to me, that translating the name would make it
                        > > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak. Perhaps
                        > > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even /sandvik/. It
                        > > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
                        > >
                      • wakuran_wakaran
                        ... on it. ... ignorance. ... Well, butter is called smör in scandinavian, because you use it for smearing... =S Butter is a west germanic greco-latin
                        Message 11 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "parked71" <parked@x> wrote:
                          >
                          > Apologies for that, I've now located "Butterbrot" in my German
                          > dictionary. I was actually reminded of it when Websters Online
                          > Dictionary came up with "Buterbrod" in Ukrainean and Turkmen.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Jan-Willem Benjamins
                          > <benjaminsjw@y...> wrote:
                          > > I'm sorry but I have never heard of "butterbrood". We do have
                          > > "boterham", which is a slice of bread, with or without something
                          on it.
                          > >
                          > > Interestingly enough, buterbrod does exist in Russian, meaning
                          > > sandwich. My guess is that it's a loan from german, or possibly
                          > > low-german.
                          > >
                          > > Jan-Willem
                          > >
                          > > --- parked71 <parked@x> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in any
                          > > > of
                          > > > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That's
                          > > > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
                          > > > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
                          >
                          > And sorry to have doubted you Aron. It seemed logical to me that is
                          > Swedish and Scanian had only one "r" then so would Danish. Just goes
                          > to show that you shouldn't make assumptions from a position of
                          ignorance.
                          >
                          > BTW I had heard of "smörgås". Strangely enough, translating it into
                          > "smear-goose" doesn't make it's meaning any more obvious :-)
                          >
                          >
                          Well, "butter" is called "smör" in scandinavian, because you use it
                          for smearing... =S "Butter" is a west germanic greco-latin borrowing.
                          The theory I have heard is that when you churned butter, the butter
                          came up to the surface and floated around like geese. Thus, it was
                          originally referring to the butter, and not sandwiches.

                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > > > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
                          > > > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more
                          > > > layers
                          > > > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
                          > > > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other words.
                          > > > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for food?
                          > >
                          > >

                          I have heard about an old swedish verb "tve-sovla", which means
                          putting two layers different things on a sandwich, I heard it could
                          also be used figurativley...
                        • wakuran_wakaran
                          ... Yeah, it s from the american cartoon character, Dagobert Krikelin . Except for Dagobert-macka , it could also be called Krikelinare (Krikelin-er) from
                          Message 12 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "parked71" <parked@x> wrote:
                            >
                            > > >
                            > > > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                            > > which I'm not
                            > > > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of
                            > sandwhich
                            > > with 7-8
                            > > > "layers" of bread.
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > > That takes me way back to my childhood. Perhaps 25 years ago, I was
                            > at
                            > > a primary school which, in an effort to encourage the children to
                            > eat
                            > > a healthier diet, introduced us to "Dagwood" sandwiches. It was so
                            > > long ago I don't recall correctly. It MIGHT have been "Dagbert" or
                            > > "Dagobert". It was definitely some word starting with "Dag". It was
                            > a
                            > > sandwich with several layers of fillings. And we as children were
                            > > encouraged to make it ourselves. Which led to some unlikely
                            > > conbinations such as salami,egg, nutella and marmalade.
                            >
                            > And from the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary:
                            >
                            > Dagwood /"dagwUd/ n.
                            > N. Amer.L20. [Dagwood Bumstead, comic-strip character who makes and
                            > eats such sandwiches.]
                            > In full Dagwood sandwich. A thick sandwich filled with mixed meats and
                            > cheeses with a variety of seasonings and dressings.

                            Yeah, it's from the american cartoon character, "Dagobert Krikelin".
                            Except for "Dagobert-macka", it could also be called "Krikelinare"
                            (Krikelin-er) from his swedish surname. (The surname doesn't mean
                            anything in swedish. It just sounds silly.)
                          • wakuran_wakaran
                            ... signs in ... word SV ... containing of ... CD in a ... frequent ... That swedish word mostly means a girl in a double penetration. I guess it could also be
                            Message 13 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                              --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                              > freidag 3 december 2004 10:11 skreb parked71:
                              > > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in any of
                              > > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That's
                              > > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
                              > > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
                              >
                              > Yes, I am sure, there are two R's in smørre-.
                              >
                              > > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
                              > > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more layers
                              > > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
                              > > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other words.
                              > > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for food?
                              >
                              > SV uses the "sandwich" as a borrowing in some of theese places.
                              > ("Sandwichgubbe" = Sandwich man, a walking person with commercial
                              signs in
                              > front of and behind him.)
                              >
                              > Also, there is SV macka, a synonym of SV smörgås. There is a related
                              word SV
                              > dubbelmacka which is sometimes used as a synonym of things
                              containing of
                              > something in the middle of two other things (such as a threesome, a
                              CD in a
                              > CD case, a letter in a folder, ...). I would characterise this as
                              frequent
                              > though.
                              >
                              That swedish word mostly means a girl in a double penetration.
                              I guess it could also be used for three guys on top of each other... =S

                              > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                              which I'm not
                              > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of sandwhich
                              with 7-8
                              > "layers" of bread.
                              >
                              > Aron
                              >
                              > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                              > > > Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word
                              > >
                              > > "smörmad"
                              > > (or elder
                              > >
                              > > > "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into "sandwich".
                              > > >
                              > > > SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate
                              > >
                              > > of smear
                              > > I think)
                              > >
                              > > > and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".
                              > > >
                              > > > Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of some
                              > >
                              > > kind
                              > >
                              > > > (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern times) some
                              > >
                              > > marmelade,
                              > >
                              > > > jam, hunny or cheese on top.
                              > > >
                              > > > The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the
                              > >
                              > > danish
                              > > equivalent
                              > >
                              > > > is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they
                              > >
                              > > are
                              > > pretty much
                              > >
                              > > > variations of the same concept.
                              > > >
                              > > > Aron
                              > > >
                              > > > fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
                              > > > > One the great British gifts to the world.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT variations on
                              > > > > "sandwich"?
                              > > > >
                              > > > > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in
                              > >
                              > > laughter.
                              > >
                              > > > > It never occured to me, that translating the name would make it
                              > > > > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak. Perhaps
                              > > > > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even
                              > >
                              > > /sandvik/. It
                              > >
                              > > > > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                            • parked71
                              ... any of ... layers ... I wonder if it was you who scared off all the American s who used to be on this forum.... ... sandwich . ... some ... variations on
                              Message 14 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                                --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran" <hakans@w...> wrote:
                                >
                                > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                                > > freidag 3 december 2004 10:11 skreb parked71:
                                > > > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in
                                any of
                                > > > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment. That's
                                > > > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
                                > > > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
                                > >
                                > > Yes, I am sure, there are two R's in smørre-.
                                > >
                                > > > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
                                > > > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more
                                layers
                                > > > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
                                > > > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other words.
                                > > > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for food?
                                > >
                                > > SV uses the "sandwich" as a borrowing in some of theese places.
                                > > ("Sandwichgubbe" = Sandwich man, a walking person with commercial
                                > signs in
                                > > front of and behind him.)
                                > >
                                > > Also, there is SV macka, a synonym of SV smörgås. There is a related
                                > word SV
                                > > dubbelmacka which is sometimes used as a synonym of things
                                > containing of
                                > > something in the middle of two other things (such as a threesome, a
                                > CD in a
                                > > CD case, a letter in a folder, ...). I would characterise this as
                                > frequent
                                > > though.
                                > >
                                > That swedish word mostly means a girl in a double penetration.
                                > I guess it could also be used for three guys on top of each other... =S

                                I wonder if it was you who scared off all the American's who used to
                                be on this forum....





                                >
                                > > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                                > which I'm not
                                > > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of sandwhich
                                > with 7-8
                                > > "layers" of bread.
                                > >
                                > > Aron
                                > >
                                > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                                > > > > Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word
                                > > >
                                > > > "smörmad"
                                > > > (or elder
                                > > >
                                > > > > "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into
                                "sandwich".
                                > > > >
                                > > > > SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate
                                > > >
                                > > > of smear
                                > > > I think)
                                > > >
                                > > > > and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of
                                some
                                > > >
                                > > > kind
                                > > >
                                > > > > (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern times) some
                                > > >
                                > > > marmelade,
                                > > >
                                > > > > jam, hunny or cheese on top.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the
                                > > >
                                > > > danish
                                > > > equivalent
                                > > >
                                > > > > is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they
                                > > >
                                > > > are
                                > > > pretty much
                                > > >
                                > > > > variations of the same concept.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Aron
                                > > > >
                                > > > > fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
                                > > > > > One the great British gifts to the world.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT
                                variations on
                                > > > > > "sandwich"?
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in
                                > > >
                                > > > laughter.
                                > > >
                                > > > > > It never occured to me, that translating the name would make it
                                > > > > > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak. Perhaps
                                > > > > > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even
                                > > >
                                > > > /sandvik/. It
                                > > >
                                > > > > > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                              • wakuran_wakaran
                                ... That s ... words. ... food? ... other... =S ... Well, americans will be americans... =S Anyway, I guess they just got bored... ... make it ... Perhaps
                                Message 15 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                                  --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "parked71" <parked@x> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran" <hakans@w...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                                  > > > freidag 3 december 2004 10:11 skreb parked71:
                                  > > > > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in
                                  > any of
                                  > > > > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment.
                                  That's
                                  > > > > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
                                  > > > > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Yes, I am sure, there are two R's in smørre-.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a different
                                  > > > > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more
                                  > layers
                                  > > > > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
                                  > > > > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other
                                  words.
                                  > > > > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for
                                  food?
                                  > > >
                                  > > > SV uses the "sandwich" as a borrowing in some of theese places.
                                  > > > ("Sandwichgubbe" = Sandwich man, a walking person with commercial
                                  > > signs in
                                  > > > front of and behind him.)
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Also, there is SV macka, a synonym of SV smörgås. There is a related
                                  > > word SV
                                  > > > dubbelmacka which is sometimes used as a synonym of things
                                  > > containing of
                                  > > > something in the middle of two other things (such as a threesome, a
                                  > > CD in a
                                  > > > CD case, a letter in a folder, ...). I would characterise this as
                                  > > frequent
                                  > > > though.
                                  > > >
                                  > > That swedish word mostly means a girl in a double penetration.
                                  > > I guess it could also be used for three guys on top of each
                                  other... =S
                                  >
                                  > I wonder if it was you who scared off all the American's who used to
                                  > be on this forum....
                                  >
                                  >
                                  Well, americans will be americans... =S
                                  Anyway, I guess they just got bored...

                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  > > > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                                  > > which I'm not
                                  > > > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of sandwhich
                                  > > with 7-8
                                  > > > "layers" of bread.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Aron
                                  > > >
                                  > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                                  > > > > > Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > "smörmad"
                                  > > > > (or elder
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into
                                  > "sandwich".
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > of smear
                                  > > > > I think)
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of
                                  > some
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > kind
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern times) some
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > marmelade,
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > jam, hunny or cheese on top.
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > danish
                                  > > > > equivalent
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > are
                                  > > > > pretty much
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > variations of the same concept.
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > Aron
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
                                  > > > > > > One the great British gifts to the world.
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT
                                  > variations on
                                  > > > > > > "sandwich"?
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the floor in
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > laughter.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > > It never occured to me, that translating the name would
                                  make it
                                  > > > > > > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak.
                                  Perhaps
                                  > > > > > > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > /sandvik/. It
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > > > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > >
                                • wakuran_wakaran
                                  ... different ... related ... threesome, a ... Anyway, you know how swedes are... Obsessed with sex, and prone to depression if they aon t get any... (There
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Dec 3, 2004
                                    --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran" <hakans@w...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "parked71" <parked@x> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran" <hakans@w...>
                                    > wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...> wrote:
                                    > > > > freidag 3 december 2004 10:11 skreb parked71:
                                    > > > > > I vaguely remember that Dutch has "butterbrood" but it's not in
                                    > > any of
                                    > > > > > the dictionaries that I have access to online at the moment.
                                    > That's
                                    > > > > > the same literal meaning as "smørrebrød" (Are you sure there
                                    > > > > > are two "r"s in the first part of this word?)
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Yes, I am sure, there are two R's in smørre-.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > > On a related note, sandwich in English can be used in a
                                    different
                                    > > > > > context, meaning not food but anything constructed of 2 or more
                                    > > layers
                                    > > > > > of different substances. Especially in compound words such as
                                    > > > > > "sandwich-construction". As a synonym for "laminate" in other
                                    > words.
                                    > > > > > Do any other languages use "sandwich" in this way or just for
                                    > food?
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > SV uses the "sandwich" as a borrowing in some of theese places.
                                    > > > > ("Sandwichgubbe" = Sandwich man, a walking person with commercial
                                    > > > signs in
                                    > > > > front of and behind him.)
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Also, there is SV macka, a synonym of SV smörgås. There is a
                                    related
                                    > > > word SV
                                    > > > > dubbelmacka which is sometimes used as a synonym of things
                                    > > > containing of
                                    > > > > something in the middle of two other things (such as a
                                    threesome, a
                                    > > > CD in a
                                    > > > > CD case, a letter in a folder, ...). I would characterise this as
                                    > > > frequent
                                    > > > > though.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > That swedish word mostly means a girl in a double penetration.
                                    > > > I guess it could also be used for three guys on top of each
                                    > other... =S
                                    > >
                                    > > I wonder if it was you who scared off all the American's who used to
                                    > > be on this forum....
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > Well, americans will be americans... =S
                                    > Anyway, I guess they just got bored...
                                    >
                                    Anyway, you know how swedes are... Obsessed with sex, and prone to
                                    depression if they aon't get any...
                                    (There might be some truth to that myth, but actually I believe that
                                    is quite universal...)

                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > > Once when I visited Upper Sweden I faced a word "Dagobertmacka"
                                    > > > which I'm not
                                    > > > > quite sure of what it means. They used it for some kind of
                                    sandwhich
                                    > > > with 7-8
                                    > > > > "layers" of bread.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Aron
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Aron Boström <aron@l...>
                                    wrote:
                                    > > > > > > Maybe they are not entirely synonyms. But the scanian word
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > "smörmad"
                                    > > > > > (or elder
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > "fittamad", or simply "mad") is allways translated into
                                    > > "sandwich".
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > SCY smörmad actually means "butter food" (smör is a cognate
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > of smear
                                    > > > > > I think)
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > and SCY fittamad means "food with fat".
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > Anyway, it's a slice of bread, covered on one side with fat of
                                    > > some
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > kind
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > (usually margarine nowadays) and possibly (in modern
                                    times) some
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > marmelade,
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > jam, hunny or cheese on top.
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > The swedish equivalent is "smörgås" ("butter goose") and the
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > danish
                                    > > > > > equivalent
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > is "smørrebrød". Though these are not 100% equivalent, they
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > are
                                    > > > > > pretty much
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > variations of the same concept.
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > Aron
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > fredagen den 3 december 2004 09:45 skrev parked71:
                                    > > > > > > > One the great British gifts to the world.
                                    > > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > > Are there any synonyms in the Germlangs that are NOT
                                    > > variations on
                                    > > > > > > > "sandwich"?
                                    > > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > > BTW, the swedish word "sandvik" had me rolling on the
                                    floor in
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > laughter.
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > > It never occured to me, that translating the name would
                                    > make it
                                    > > > > > > > somehow more obvious as to what a "sandwich" is.
                                    > > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > > I think the word should just be "sandwich" in Folksprak.
                                    > Perhaps
                                    > > > > > > > pronounced /sandwIx/ or /sandvits/ or /sandvIS/ or even
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > /sandvik/. It
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > > depends on what sounds your dialect permits as native.
                                    > > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > >
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