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Re: Long Vowel Suggestion

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  • parked71
    ... vowels. ... vowel, ... wakuran_wakaran s ... Germanic ... make ... whether ... that it ... needed ... basic ... in my ... them ... A good real example
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 29, 2004
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      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "wakuran_wakaran" <hakans@w...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "parked71" <parked@x> wrote:
      > >
      > > There are a number of suggestions for indicating long/short
      vowels.
      > > Refer to the poll entitled:
      > >
      > > "Long and short vowels, how? btw. man is a word with a short
      vowel,
      > > grot is a word with a long vowel."
      > >
      > > By far the easiest to learn and least ambiguous is
      wakuran_wakaran's
      > > dumsprák method which uses accute accents.
      >
      > BTW, I picked it up from Xipirho, who picked it up from
      > Icelandic.(It's just that Xipirho follows the poll results... =S)
      >
      > > I personally think that is makes words look far too much like
      > > Icelandic (or like some Tolkien Elflang) and none of the big
      Germanic
      > > languages use anything like it to indicate vowel length. It also
      make
      > > it harder to type words with a US keyboard. In other words,
      whether
      > > the accute accent are easily available is very dependent on what
      > > keyboard/keyboard driver one is using. But I still acknowledge
      that it
      > > is very unambiguous and easy to learn.
      > > The original Folksprak charter stated that the spelling system
      needed
      > > to be without accent marks or special characters, just the 26
      basic
      > > roman letters. I myself am guilty of using a special characters
      in my
      > > own dialect of Folksprak, because I think it would make Folksprak
      > > better. English is the only big Germlang that doesn't use special
      > > characters in any great numbers, so I'm not in principle against
      them
      > > where their use is strictly necessary.
      > >
      >
      > BTW, I don't think double vowels are that ambiguous and illogical.
      > Anyway, they probably are less ambiguous than the english spelling
      > system, anyway... =S
      >
      > Another problem is stress, how to spell the difference between
      > "hakkat" and "hakatt". (Not real words, I guess in this sense double
      > consonants would be fine, though... Maybe using double consonants in
      > case the stress is "unnatural", or something.)


      A good "real" example would be "kappel" versus "kapell"

      In the Germlangs, the stress falls on the stem of native germanic
      words. I find it relatively
      easly to guess the stress pattern, so long as I can recognise the
      germanic stem and
      recognise which syllables are gramitical suffixes such as -en, -ed,
      -de, -est, -er, -el. Also
      prefixes such as for-, be-, ge-.
      In Romance borrowings the stress tends to fall on the last syllable,
      in most Germlangs
      except English.

      So I guess it helps a lot if one can distinguish what is a Romance
      word such as
      "konstruk'tion" versus a Germanic work such as "ge'bauwing"






      >
      > Then, there could be a possible ambiguity whether ¨s are umlauts
      or
      > tremas, though...
      >
      > Maybe letters like æ and ø (although I use the oe ligature)
      could be
      > individual vowels, (also sometimes indications of umlaut), whereas
      > äëïöüÿ are tremas, just a thought... =S (I don't know how often
      tremas
      > could be needed...)
      >
      > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "J. M. McDonald" <jmcd_14@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > There should definitely be a written indication of a long vowel,
      > > lest
      > > > FS fall into the pronunciation calamity that is English
      spelling. I
      > > > don't think we should use acute accents, but perhaps something
      more
      > > > Germanic like umlauts or something. Double vowels can get weird-
      > > > looking and tricky (i.e. long /o/ being /oo/, English speakers
      will
      > > > automatically think of a long /u/).
      > > >
      > > > Here is an example of what I'm talking about. Consider all
      vowels
      > > > long here.
      > > >
      > > > long a = ä or å
      > > > long e = ë or æ
      > > > long i = ï or ÿ
      > > > long o = ö or ø
      > > > long u = ü
      > > >
      > > > These are only ideas... feel free to suggest others.
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