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Re: Another Bible Story

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  • tungol65
    ... Interesting about farmer, I just looked up its origin. I didn t know that before. Yeah German has Bauer with a u , so I guess búer is better. ...
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 16, 2004
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      > bór - maybe english "farmer", though it is a modern word derived
      > from a misunderstanding of the french word.. Guess it is OK, tho,
      > maybe búer or something..

      Interesting about farmer, I just looked up its origin. I didn't know
      that before. Yeah German has "Bauer" with a "u", so I guess "búer" is
      better.

      > "fretede" - why not etede?
      > Much simpler, and easier to understand for english speakers..?
      > I guess freten is OK, tho it means different things in the core
      > langs.. Are you trying to get across a feeling that the seed got
      > eaten very quickly and roughly?

      "freten" is from Ger."fressen", Dut."vreten" and there is
      Gothic "fraitan". They all mean to devour, to gobble up, to eat
      quickly as opposed to plain eat.

      > féle - "much"/"a lot of" is difficult, in scandinvian there are
      > words similar.. in german and dutch "viel" =S.. Maybe one should
      use
      > a way of rewriting it like "heel" "ful" or something.. Don't know..
      > sprótede - ? sprouted?
      >
      > Mar is only used in dutch, it is a little similar to scandinavian
      > men, and german aber, tho, don't know a better word...
      > Just rephrasing the sentence with "doch" or something...
      >
      > skínde - shined? ferbrande - burned? damned? fervelkede??
      > vortelen - advantages? herbs/roots?

      "skínen" = to shine, from Ger."scheinen", Dut."schijnen", Nor."skinne"

      A while ago it was suggested in some postings that a distinction be
      made between causal/causative verbs and regular verbs. In English
      this is not always differenciated.

      "he drowns", "the dog drowns", but "he drowns the dog" (this really
      means "he (causes) the dog to drown"

      It was suggested using the prefix "fer-" to show these
      causative/causal verbs in Folkspraak. So you would have:

      "de hus bran" = the house burns
      but "ik ferbran de hus" = I (cause) the house to burn

      This prefix is also used to form verbs from adjectives in some of the
      other Germanic languages.

      "bréd" = broad/wide
      "ferbréden" = to broaden/to widen
      "ród" = red
      "ferróden" = to redden

      > als sát? when sown??
      > I generally use "lijk" for als, but I don't know if it will fit in
      > this context..
    • wakuran_wakaran
      ... tho, ... know ... is ... Hmm, in swedish, the word fra ta ususally means something like To form (a passage or channel etc.) by erosion or abrasion.
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 16, 2004
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        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "tungol65" <rdw.young@n...> wrote:
        > > bór - maybe english "farmer", though it is a modern word derived
        > > from a misunderstanding of the french word.. Guess it is OK,
        tho,
        > > maybe búer or something..
        >
        > Interesting about farmer, I just looked up its origin. I didn't
        know
        > that before. Yeah German has "Bauer" with a "u", so I guess "búer"
        is
        > better.
        >
        > > "fretede" - why not etede?
        > > Much simpler, and easier to understand for english speakers..?
        > > I guess freten is OK, tho it means different things in the core
        > > langs.. Are you trying to get across a feeling that the seed got
        > > eaten very quickly and roughly?
        >
        > "freten" is from Ger."fressen", Dut."vreten" and there is
        > Gothic "fraitan". They all mean to devour, to gobble up, to eat
        > quickly as opposed to plain eat.


        Hmm, in swedish, the word "fra"ta" ususally means something like
        "To form (a passage or channel etc.) by erosion or abrasion."
        Swedish has the verb "frossa", tho, (meaning "to glutton")probably
        derived (and altered) from german.


        > >
        > > skínde - shined? ferbrande - burned? damned? fervelkede??
        > > vortelen - advantages? herbs/roots?
        >
        > "skínen" = to shine, from Ger."scheinen", Dut."schijnen",
        Nor."skinne"
        >
        > A while ago it was suggested in some postings that a distinction
        be
        > made between causal/causative verbs and regular verbs. In English
        > this is not always differenciated.
        >
        > "he drowns", "the dog drowns", but "he drowns the dog" (this
        really
        > means "he (causes) the dog to drown"
        >
        > It was suggested using the prefix "fer-" to show these
        > causative/causal verbs in Folkspraak. So you would have:
        >
        > "de hus bran" = the house burns
        > but "ik ferbran de hus" = I (cause) the house to burn
        >
        > This prefix is also used to form verbs from adjectives in some of
        the
        > other Germanic languages.
        >
        > "bréd" = broad/wide
        > "ferbréden" = to broaden/to widen
        > "ród" = red
        > "ferróden" = to redden
        >
        > > als sát? when sown??
        > > I generally use "lijk" for als, but I don't know if it will fit
        in
        > > this context..

        Uhh, yeah, but do the plants really burn up into ash??..
        Don't they just wither??... The bible is a strange book... =S
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