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Re: [folkspraak] Re: jo. wat ar op?

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  • Xipirho
    ... a, OK, so verfor bruhkd han tungol in dat ? ax, ond verfor hav englisk star ne tungol nu?
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 5, 2003
      On Thursday, Sep 4, 2003, at 01:55 Europe/London, wordwulf wrote:
      >>
      >>> Daan
      >>> Goedkoop hav en gud grammatik makt, ik hav en new gud grammatik
      > makt,
      >>> ik hav en vordenbuk med 2700 vorden makt, tungol ?
      >>
      >> vat mehn "tungol"?
      >>
      >> what does "tungol" mean?
      >
      > 'Tungol' ar de ald Englisk vord for stern. 'Tungolcraeft' ,to
      > bispel, vare 'astronomi' or 'sternvetenskap'.
      >
      > 'Tungol' is the Old English word for star. 'Tungolcraeft', for
      > example, would be 'astronomy'.

      a, OK, so verfor bruhkd han "tungol" in dat <sentence>? ax, ond verfor
      hav englisk "star" ne "tungol" nu?
    • Xipirho
      ... gohd (kan du tenk av an voird for dat?!). ax, vat mehn di or in orsak ? mi (ond an vord for dat? :-) ) dat in mihn skrihbing et volt er
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 5, 2003
        On Thursday, Sep 4, 2003, at 02:07 Europe/London, wordwulf wrote:

        >>> Du KUND find anig <reason> havan tvo vordz for dat?!
        >
        > How about 'sak' or 'orsak' for <reason> That's what Scandinavian
        > languages us, and is equivalent to English 'sake'.

        gohd <idea> (kan du tenk av an voird for dat?!). ax, vat mehn di "or"
        in "orsak"? mi <suppose> (ond an vord for dat? :-) ) dat in mihn
        skrihbing et volt er "sahk"...

        >> in between. In the end it all comes down to your choice, unless we
        >> looked it up in protogermanic dictionary to find the root.
        >
        > How about 'myg' or 'myk'?

        ja. "myk"/"myg" volt er gohd. <however> ne-tenk du "u" <might> er
        beter, for englisk hav an "u" ond et er di grohtest av di tungen?

        yea. "myk"/"myg" would be good. however don't you think "u" might be
        better, for english has a "u" and it is the largest of the tungs?

        >>
        >>> varfor <chose> du "nigt" den? varfor nikt "nikt" eler "nit"?
        >
        > How about 'vale' for <choose> German 'Waehlen'.

        er et di mehr <widespread> av vorden for "choose"?
      • tungol65
        ... verfor ... Hi All, I m flattered to see my name has caused some activity. tungol according to my OE dictionaries can mean either star, constellation or
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 5, 2003
          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Xipirho <xipirho@r...> wrote:
          >
          > On Thursday, Sep 4, 2003, at 01:55 Europe/London, wordwulf wrote:
          > >>
          > >>> Daan
          > >>> Goedkoop hav en gud grammatik makt, ik hav en new gud grammatik
          > > makt,
          > >>> ik hav en vordenbuk med 2700 vorden makt, tungol ?
          > >>
          > >> vat mehn "tungol"?
          > >>
          > >> what does "tungol" mean?
          > >
          > > 'Tungol' ar de ald Englisk vord for stern. 'Tungolcraeft' ,to
          > > bispel, vare 'astronomi' or 'sternvetenskap'.
          > >
          > > 'Tungol' is the Old English word for star. 'Tungolcraeft', for
          > > example, would be 'astronomy'.
          >
          > a, OK, so verfor bruhkd han "tungol" in dat <sentence>? ax, ond
          verfor
          > hav englisk "star" ne "tungol" nu?


          Hi All,

          I'm flattered to see my name has caused some activity. "tungol"
          according to my OE dictionaries can mean either star, constellation
          or planet. I just liked the sound of the word and it reflected my
          other interest in astronomy.

          Regards Robert
        • Xipirho
          ... heheh! et ver realik an - di ver dat et ver literalik . dues koment ver senslik ond mi
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 5, 2003
            On Thursday, Sep 4, 2003, at 07:13 Europe/London, David Barrow wrote:

            > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Xipirho <xipirho@r...> wrote:
            >> so, wat ar goende duhn in di folksprahk grupe nu? som neu tingen?
            > mi ar
            >> komd hejm nu fron mihn ferie.
            >
            > Hi all
            >
            > 'What's up' is an English idiom, should it be translated literally?
            >
            > will folkspraak borrow idioms from contributing languages as is, or
            > create its own.
            >
            > How, for example, does it denote existence? There + be like English
            > es gibt as in German, a form similar to that in some other Germanic
            > Language
            >
            > David Barrow

            heheh! et ver realik an <intentionally humorous phrase> - di <humour>
            ver dat et ver literalik <translated>. dues koment ver senslik <though>
            ond mi ne-viht vat vi skuld do op dihz <issue>.

            heheh! it was really an intentionally humourous phrase - the humour was
            that it was literally translated. your comment was sensible though and
            i don't know what we should do on this issue.
          • Xipirho
            ... et ondso er slang in englisk, ond et er amerikaisk realik. du viht dis! it s also slang in english, and its american really. you probably know
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 5, 2003
              On Thursday, Sep 4, 2003, at 09:29 Europe/London, don_skov wrote:

              >
              >>
              >> 'What's up' is an English idiom, should it be translated literally?
              >>
              >> will folkspraak borrow idioms from contributing languages as is, or
              >> create its own.
              >
              > I think not, people would get into a lot of trouble if they were to
              > understand danish/jutish idioms in folkspraak. A form like wat op is
              > of course an english inspired form that most people know, and like
              > alle other languages folkspraak will of course be influenced by
              > english. It the same thing in danish, we have traqnslated the
              > idiom "what's up" by "Hvad så" = "what then" but it is considered
              > slang, and is especially connected to hip-hop, or skter types, its
              > definitly not used in phd.'s I think the same thin goes for
              > folkspraak.

              et ondso er slang in englisk, ond et er amerikaisk realik. du
              <probably> viht dis!

              it's also slang in english, and its american really. you probably know
              this!
            • wordwulf
              ... verfor ... Englisk havde manig vorden in de forntid dat ar ne brukt nu. Fron tid to tid, havde Aldenglisk mer als en vord for de sam ting. To bispel,
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 8, 2003
                > > 'Tungol' ar de ald Englisk vord for stern. 'Tungolcraeft' ,to
                > > bispel, vare 'astronomi' or 'sternvetenskap'.
                > >
                > > 'Tungol' is the Old English word for star. 'Tungolcraeft', for
                > > example, would be 'astronomy'.
                >
                > a, OK, so verfor bruhkd han "tungol" in dat <sentence>? ax, ond
                verfor
                > hav englisk "star" ne "tungol" nu?

                Englisk havde manig vorden in de forntid dat ar ne brukt nu. Fron
                tid to tid, havde Aldenglisk mer als en vord for de sam ting. To
                bispel, havde Aldenglisk manig vorden for 'war' oder 'slaughter'-
                beado, wig, heatho-, wael, ond so vider. After de Norman
                overmakting, nemde Englisk in mer als 10.000 vorden fron Fransosisk,
                ond Englisk forlosde okso manig vorden, to bispel, 'tungol'. De
                ander vord, 'steorra' verdede de alldaglig vord for 'star'.

                English had many words in the olden days that are not used now. From
                time to time, Old English had more than one word for the same thing.
                For example, Old English had more than one word for 'war'
                or 'slaughter' - beado, wig, heatho-, wael, and so forth. After the
                Norman conquest (I had to construct a word for conquest, since I
                don't know it in the other Germanic languages -"overpowering"),
                English took in more than 10,000 words from French, and English also
                lost many words, for example, 'tungol'. The other word, 'steorra'
                became the everyday word for 'star'.
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