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Re: [folkspraak] Re: De dagen, de jartiden ond de moneden

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  • Xipirho
    Mart comes from romagod mars yes? Swedish doesnt change the name (seemingly!). Call it mars then! ... Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 3, 2002
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      Mart comes from romagod "mars" yes? Swedish doesnt change the name
      (seemingly!). Call it mars then!

      On Thursday, August 22, 2002, at 04:31 AM, wordwulf wrote:

      > --- In folkspraak@y..., "tungol65" <robert.young24@n...> wrote:
      >> --- In folkspraak@y..., "wordwulf" <eparsels@n...> wrote:
      >>> Goddag, Folksprakeren,
      >>> Vat skull de dagens namen vare? Ik denk dis her ar god:
      >>> Mondag
      >>> Tivsdag
      >>> Vonsdag
      >>> Donersdag
      >>> Fridag
      >>> Saterdag
      >>> Sundag
      >>>
      >>> Ond for de jartidens namen:
      >>>
      >>> Lent
      >>> Sommer
      >>> Hervst
      >>> Vinter
      >>>
      >>> Ond for de monedens namen:
      >>>
      >>> Januar
      >>> Februar
      >>> Mars
      >>> April
      >>> Mai
      >>> Juni
      >>> Juli
      >>> August
      >>> September
      >>> Oktober
      >>> November
      >>> Desember
      >>>
      >>> De dagstiden:
      >>>
      >>> Morgen
      >>> Middag
      >>> Overmiddag
      >>> Avend
      >>> Nakt
      >>> Midnakt
      >>>
      >>> Vat denk je om dis?
      >>>
      >>> Erik
      >>
      >> I like all of these, I would however prefer Mart over Mars for
      > March.
      >>
      >> In ennes ond frendskip Robert
      >
      > Hmm, German ends March with a z /ts/, which would go back to a t
      > before the zweite Lautverschiebung, while Swedish ends it with an s
      > and Dutch and Afrikaans end it with a t. English ends it with ch
      > /tS/. The Swedish form is probably borrowed ultimately from German,
      > and the Swedes pronounced German /ts/ as /s/, just as they did with
      > German 'Grenze', Swedish 'grans' (I know, but I'm doing this online
      > without umlauts). So I guess all of that is a long-winded way of
      > saying that March should be Folksprak *Mart. Okay, sounds good to me.
      >
      > Januar, Februar, Mart, April, Mai, Juni, Juli, August, September,
      > Oktober, November, Desember
      >
      > Vat denk allen? Ar dis god to stelle so in de vordbok?
      >
      > Erik
      >
      >
      >
      > Browse the draft word lists!
      > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
      > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
      >
      > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
      > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
      >
      Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • wordwulf
      ... s ... German, ... with ... online ... to me. ... http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ ... Actually, I think that the German and Dutch forms come from the
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 4, 2002
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        --- In folkspraak@y..., Xipirho <xipirho@r...> wrote:
        > Mart comes from romagod "mars" yes? Swedish doesnt change the name
        > (seemingly!). Call it mars then!
        >
        > On Thursday, August 22, 2002, at 04:31 AM, wordwulf wrote:
        >
        > > --- In folkspraak@y..., "tungol65" <robert.young24@n...> wrote:
        > >> --- In folkspraak@y..., "wordwulf" <eparsels@n...> wrote:
        > >>> Goddag, Folksprakeren,
        > >>> Vat skull de dagens namen vare? Ik denk dis her ar god:
        > >>> Mondag
        > >>> Tivsdag
        > >>> Vonsdag
        > >>> Donersdag
        > >>> Fridag
        > >>> Saterdag
        > >>> Sundag
        > >>>
        > >>> Ond for de jartidens namen:
        > >>>
        > >>> Lent
        > >>> Sommer
        > >>> Hervst
        > >>> Vinter
        > >>>
        > >>> Ond for de monedens namen:
        > >>>
        > >>> Januar
        > >>> Februar
        > >>> Mars
        > >>> April
        > >>> Mai
        > >>> Juni
        > >>> Juli
        > >>> August
        > >>> September
        > >>> Oktober
        > >>> November
        > >>> Desember
        > >>>
        > >>> De dagstiden:
        > >>>
        > >>> Morgen
        > >>> Middag
        > >>> Overmiddag
        > >>> Avend
        > >>> Nakt
        > >>> Midnakt
        > >>>
        > >>> Vat denk je om dis?
        > >>>
        > >>> Erik
        > >>
        > >> I like all of these, I would however prefer Mart over Mars for
        > > March.
        > >>
        > >> In ennes ond frendskip Robert
        > >
        > > Hmm, German ends March with a z /ts/, which would go back to a t
        > > before the zweite Lautverschiebung, while Swedish ends it with an
        s
        > > and Dutch and Afrikaans end it with a t. English ends it with ch
        > > /tS/. The Swedish form is probably borrowed ultimately from
        German,
        > > and the Swedes pronounced German /ts/ as /s/, just as they did
        with
        > > German 'Grenze', Swedish 'grans' (I know, but I'm doing this
        online
        > > without umlauts). So I guess all of that is a long-winded way of
        > > saying that March should be Folksprak *Mart. Okay, sounds good
        to me.
        > >
        > > Januar, Februar, Mart, April, Mai, Juni, Juli, August, September,
        > > Oktober, November, Desember
        > >
        > > Vat denk allen? Ar dis god to stelle so in de vordbok?
        > >
        > > Erik
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Browse the draft word lists!
        > > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
        > > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
        > >
        > > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
        > > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).
        >

        Actually, I think that the German and Dutch forms come from the Latin
        root form, which is Mart-. In Latin 3rd declension nouns, the
        endings attach directly to the root, so the basic singular forms of
        the word would be:
        nominative MART-S
        genitive MART-IS
        dative MART-I
        accusative MART-EM
        ablative MART-E
        Since Latin -ts- assimilates to -s-, the nominative form ends up
        being MARS, even though the root of the word ends with a -t. Derived
        words, such as martial and Martian, of course, retain the -t-.

        Erik
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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