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PanGermanic

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  • Abrigon Gusiq
    I thought this was for a panGermanic language/speech, and not to create English all over again? Telefon, should be something in a Germanic mold, and not a
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 25, 2002
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      I thought this was for a panGermanic language/speech, and not to create
      English all over again?

      Telefon, should be something in a Germanic mold, and not a borrowing.

      Mike
    • Hans Kamp
      ... Normally you are right. I was against the word Kommunitie, because I prefered the word Gemeinskap: English mean (partial), Dutch gemeenschap, Afrikaans
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 25, 2002
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        > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
        > Van: Abrigon Gusiq [mailto:abrigon@...]
        > Verzonden: donderdag 25 juli 2002 10:27
        > Aan: Folk Spraak
        > Onderwerp: [folkspraak] PanGermanic
        >
        >
        > I thought this was for a panGermanic language/speech, and not to create
        > English all over again?
        >
        > Telefon, should be something in a Germanic mold, and not a borrowing.

        Normally you are right. I was against the word Kommunitie, because I
        prefered the word Gemeinskap: English mean (partial), Dutch gemeenschap,
        Afrikaans gemeenskap, German Gemeinschaft. But I would accept Telefon,
        because of English telephone, Dutch telefoon, German/scandinavian Telefon,
        Afrikaans (tele)foon.

        Hans Kamp.
      • abrigon
        Maybe a list of alternate words? Farspeaker or Telefon. Or like words.. I expect as long as things are consistant.. So you don t mix some forms with others and
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 25, 2002
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          Maybe a list of alternate words?

          Farspeaker or Telefon. Or like words.. I expect as long as things are
          consistant..

          So you don't mix some forms with others and get a mishmash.

          If it is to be Scriven, but then another form is Scribe, then what?
          I think the rules will be the fun part? Or already been done?

          So that a person knows that every time you have Ich Bin, you know that
          it is Du Bist in the plural. And other forms follow suit.

          Ich Shin, becomes Du Shist or like..

          Mike


          --- In folkspraak@y..., Xipirho <xipirho@r...> wrote:
          > Far speaker? What's that in FS? I guess speaker ist spraakcr, ia?
          >
        • Xipirho
          Far speaker? What s that in FS? I guess speaker ist spraakcr, ia? ... Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly). [Non-text portions of this message
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 25, 2002
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            Far speaker? What's that in FS? I guess speaker ist spraakcr, ia?

            On Thursday, July 25, 2002, at 09:12 AM, Hans Kamp wrote:

            >
            >
            >> -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
            >> Van: Abrigon Gusiq [mailto:abrigon@...]
            >> Verzonden: donderdag 25 juli 2002 10:27
            >> Aan: Folk Spraak
            >> Onderwerp: [folkspraak] PanGermanic
            >>
            >>
            >> I thought this was for a panGermanic language/speech, and not to create
            >> English all over again?
            >>
            >> Telefon, should be something in a Germanic mold, and not a borrowing.
            >
            > Normally you are right. I was against the word Kommunitie, because I
            > prefered the word Gemeinskap: English mean (partial), Dutch gemeenschap,
            > Afrikaans gemeenskap, German Gemeinschaft. But I would accept Telefon,
            > because of English telephone, Dutch telefoon, German/scandinavian Telefon,
            > Afrikaans (tele)foon.
            >
            > Hans Kamp.
            >
            >
            >
            > Browse the draft word lists!
            > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
            > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
            >
            > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
            > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            >
            Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • wordwulf
            ... create ... borrowing. ... I ... gemeenschap, ... Telefon, ... Telefon, ... http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ ... Ja, ik denke okso dat vi shulle net vare
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 25, 2002
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              --- In folkspraak@y..., Xipirho <xipirho@r...> wrote:
              > Far speaker? What's that in FS? I guess speaker ist spraakcr, ia?
              >
              > On Thursday, July 25, 2002, at 09:12 AM, Hans Kamp wrote:
              >
              > >
              > >
              > >> -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
              > >> Van: Abrigon Gusiq [mailto:abrigon@y...]
              > >> Verzonden: donderdag 25 juli 2002 10:27
              > >> Aan: Folk Spraak
              > >> Onderwerp: [folkspraak] PanGermanic
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> I thought this was for a panGermanic language/speech, and not to
              create
              > >> English all over again?
              > >>
              > >> Telefon, should be something in a Germanic mold, and not a
              borrowing.
              > >
              > > Normally you are right. I was against the word Kommunitie, because
              I
              > > prefered the word Gemeinskap: English mean (partial), Dutch
              gemeenschap,
              > > Afrikaans gemeenskap, German Gemeinschaft. But I would accept
              Telefon,
              > > because of English telephone, Dutch telefoon, German/scandinavian
              Telefon,
              > > Afrikaans (tele)foon.
              > >
              > > Hans Kamp.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Browse the draft word lists!
              > > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
              > > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
              > >
              > > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
              > > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
              > >
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).

              Ja, ik denke okso dat vi shulle net vare for myk ren mid de Germansh
              ding. De moderne germansh spraken have en del fremd vorden ond dat
              are net en problem. Men um have vi en god germansh vord, ik denke dat
              vi shulle bruke it.

              Yeah, I also think we shouldn't be too pure with the Germanic thing.
              The modern Germanic languages have a portion of foreign words and that
              isn't a problem. But if we have a good Germanic word (and I mean a
              reasonably familiar one, common to more than one language), I think
              that we should use it.

              Erik
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Hans Kamp
              ... In de Dutsh (German) Spraak ik funded de Wort Fernsprecher for Telefon. Fernsprecher is Germanish, men Telefon is Romanish. In de Nederlandish Spraak
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 25, 2002
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                > Ja, ik denke okso dat vi shulle net vare for myk ren mid de Germansh
                > ding. De moderne germansh spraken have en del fremd vorden ond dat
                > are net en problem. Men um have vi en god germansh vord, ik denke dat
                > vi shulle bruke it.
                >
                > Yeah, I also think we shouldn't be too pure with the Germanic thing.
                > The modern Germanic languages have a portion of foreign words and that
                > isn't a problem. But if we have a good Germanic word (and I mean a
                > reasonably familiar one, common to more than one language), I think
                > that we should use it.

                In de Dutsh (German) Spraak ik funded de Wort "Fernsprecher" for Telefon.
                "Fernsprecher" is Germanish, men "Telefon" is Romanish. In de Nederlandish
                Spraak ik funded "vermenigvuldigen" for menigfaldigen/multipliseren, men in
                Dutsh "multiplizieren". Men kan net untwiken Enige Romanish Worten.

                Hans Kamp.
              • bribri56@aol.com
                In a message dated 7/25/02 8:58:27 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ... Erik, do you really prefer the use of h in words like Germansh ? I once lobbied for using
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 26, 2002
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                  In a message dated 7/25/02 8:58:27 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                  eparsels@... writes:


                  > Ja, ik denke okso dat vi shulle net vare for myk ren mid de Germansh
                  > ding. De moderne germansh spraken have en del fremd vorden ond dat
                  > are net en problem. Men um have vi en god germansh vord, ik denke dat
                  > vi shulle bruke it.
                  >

                  Erik, do you really prefer the use of "h" in words like "Germansh"? I once
                  lobbied for using "c" in situations where the Germanic language variations in
                  equivalent terms are "c", "ch","k", "g" and/or "h". But since it seemed that
                  most users preferred "k", I changed my Folkspraak vocabulary to use "k", and
                  I'm getting used to it. Are you just trying out the "h" option to see if it
                  floats?

                  Hab en god Dag!
                  Brian


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • wordwulf
                  ... Germansh ... dat ... dat ... I once ... variations in ... seemed that ... k , and ... see if it ... people thought of it. It has the advantage of
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 26, 2002
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                    --- In folkspraak@y..., bribri56@a... wrote:
                    > In a message dated 7/25/02 8:58:27 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                    > eparsels@n... writes:
                    >
                    >
                    > > Ja, ik denke okso dat vi shulle net vare for myk ren mid de
                    Germansh
                    > > ding. De moderne germansh spraken have en del fremd vorden ond
                    dat
                    > > are net en problem. Men um have vi en god germansh vord, ik denke
                    dat
                    > > vi shulle bruke it.
                    > >
                    >
                    > Erik, do you really prefer the use of "h" in words like "Germansh"?
                    I once
                    > lobbied for using "c" in situations where the Germanic language
                    variations in
                    > equivalent terms are "c", "ch","k", "g" and/or "h". But since it
                    seemed that
                    > most users preferred "k", I changed my Folkspraak vocabulary to use
                    "k", and
                    > I'm getting used to it. Are you just trying out the "h" option to
                    see if it
                    > floats?
                    >
                    > Hab en god Dag!
                    > Brian
                    >
                    > Yeah, you're right; I have just been trying it out to see what
                    people thought of it. It has the advantage of indicating a
                    pronunciation /S/ that is current among what seems to be the majority
                    of Germanic speakers in words with an original /sk/. If you drop the
                    C in German and Dutch SCH spellings, you're left with SH, which then
                    agrees with English. I don't myself care for C, partly because it has
                    so many diverse pronunciations in various languages. (/k/, /s/, /ts/,
                    /C/, /S/)

                    On the flip side, though, SH has its drawbacks. It represents a
                    single phoneme /S/ by means of two characters: SK, rather than the
                    more straightforward /sk/ represented by SK. I also find that I don't
                    like the look of words like germansh, for some reason, preferring
                    germansk, even though the /sk/ pronunciation isn't as widespread. In
                    being a straightforward representation of the two phonemes, SK has the
                    edge in transparency and simplicity, plus the added bonus of being
                    closer to the original proto-Germanic form.

                    So I think I'll go back to the SK spelling.

                    Have du okso en god dag!
                    Erik
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Hans Kamp
                    ... Yes, there are many Germanic languages that have (or had) /sk/. For example fish . In German it is Fisch /fIS/, in Dutch vis /vIs/, in English fish
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 27, 2002
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                      > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
                      > Van: wordwulf [mailto:eparsels@...]
                      > Verzonden: zaterdag 27 juli 2002 5:48
                      > Aan: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
                      > Onderwerp: [folkspraak] Re: PanGermanic
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In folkspraak@y..., bribri56@a... wrote:
                      > > In a message dated 7/25/02 8:58:27 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                      > > eparsels@n... writes:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > > Ja, ik denke okso dat vi shulle net vare for myk ren mid de
                      > Germansh
                      > > > ding. De moderne germansh spraken have en del fremd vorden ond
                      > dat
                      > > > are net en problem. Men um have vi en god germansh vord, ik denke
                      > dat
                      > > > vi shulle bruke it.
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > > Erik, do you really prefer the use of "h" in words like "Germansh"?
                      > I once
                      > > lobbied for using "c" in situations where the Germanic language
                      > variations in
                      > > equivalent terms are "c", "ch","k", "g" and/or "h". But since it
                      > seemed that
                      > > most users preferred "k", I changed my Folkspraak vocabulary to use
                      > "k", and
                      > > I'm getting used to it. Are you just trying out the "h" option to
                      > see if it
                      > > floats?
                      > >
                      > > Hab en god Dag!
                      > > Brian
                      > >
                      > > Yeah, you're right; I have just been trying it out to see what
                      > people thought of it. It has the advantage of indicating a
                      > pronunciation /S/ that is current among what seems to be the majority
                      > of Germanic speakers in words with an original /sk/.

                      Yes, there are many Germanic languages that have (or had) /sk/. For example
                      "fish". In German it is "Fisch" /fIS/, in Dutch "vis" /vIs/, in English
                      "fish" /fIS/, in Old English "fisk" /fIsk/, in Scandinavian languages "fisk"
                      /fisk/. Words that starts with "sch" have their earlier versions with "sk":
                      in Dutch "school" /sxo:l/, in German "Schule" /"Su:l@/, in Afrikaans "skool"
                      /skU@l/. The variation of spelling are all sch, s, sh and sk.

                      > If you drop the
                      > C in German and Dutch SCH spellings, you're left with SH, which then
                      > agrees with English. I don't myself care for C, partly because it has
                      > so many diverse pronunciations in various languages. (/k/, /s/, /ts/,
                      > /C/, /S/)

                      Yes, c has different sounds. In Dutch c (not followed by an h) only are in
                      words that has a non-Germanic origin. In such cases c is pronounced as s
                      only, only when it is followed by e, i or y. In other cases it is pronounced
                      as s. In combination (ch) it is pronounced as /x/ only in pure Germanic
                      words like "kachel" /"kAx@l/.

                      > On the flip side, though, SH has its drawbacks. It represents a
                      > single phoneme /S/ by means of two characters: SK, rather than the
                      > more straightforward /sk/ represented by SK. I also find that I don't
                      > like the look of words like germansh, for some reason, preferring
                      > germansk, even though the /sk/ pronunciation isn't as widespread. In
                      > being a straightforward representation of the two phonemes, SK has the
                      > edge in transparency and simplicity, plus the added bonus of being
                      > closer to the original proto-Germanic form.
                      >
                      > So I think I'll go back to the SK spelling.

                      I think you are right about this. SK is pretty often used in my examples
                      above.

                      Hans Kamp.
                    • Hans Kamp
                      ... I meant: In other cases c is pronounced as /k/. Hans Kamp.
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 27, 2002
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                        > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
                        > Van: Hans Kamp [mailto:info@...]
                        > Verzonden: zaterdag 27 juli 2002 9:15
                        > Aan: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
                        > Onderwerp: RE: [folkspraak] Re: PanGermanic
                        > Yes, c has different sounds. In Dutch c (not followed by an h) only are in
                        > words that has a non-Germanic origin. In such cases c is pronounced as s
                        > only, only when it is followed by e, i or y. In other cases it is
                        > pronounced
                        > as s.

                        I meant: In other cases c is pronounced as /k/.

                        Hans Kamp.
                      • Daan Goedkoop
                        ... Afrikaans still uses /sk/, in skool, skrywe... where Dutch has sch, which makes school and schrijven. (English school and write) To me, shool en shrijven
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 27, 2002
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                          > > Yeah, you're right; I have just been trying it out to see what
                          > people thought of it. It has the advantage of indicating a
                          > pronunciation /S/ that is current among what seems to be the majority
                          > of Germanic speakers in words with an original /sk/. If you drop the
                          > C in German and Dutch SCH spellings, you're left with SH, which then
                          > agrees with English. I don't myself care for C, partly because it has
                          > so many diverse pronunciations in various languages. (/k/, /s/, /ts/,
                          > /C/, /S/)

                          Afrikaans still uses /sk/, in skool, skrywe... where Dutch has sch, which
                          makes school and schrijven. (English school and write)

                          To me, shool en shrijven looks awful.

                          By the way, final -sk and -sch have become -s in Dutch and Afrikaans,
                          everywhere in speech and also in most cases in written form. Only Dutch still
                          writes -isch (/i:s/), where Afrikaans writes -ies.

                          About the C: it can sometimes have advantages: stems need to change less if
                          you make pairs like product/procucieren, kommunication/kommunicieren or
                          whatever, instead of produkt/produsieren and kommunikation/kommunisieren.

                          --
                          GMX - Die Kommunikationsplattform im Internet.
                          http://www.gmx.net
                        • Daan Goedkoop
                          ... Afrikaans still uses /sk/, in skool, skrywe... where Dutch has sch, which makes school and schrijven. (English school and write) To me, shool en shrijven
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 27, 2002
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                            > > Yeah, you're right; I have just been trying it out to see what
                            > people thought of it. It has the advantage of indicating a
                            > pronunciation /S/ that is current among what seems to be the majority
                            > of Germanic speakers in words with an original /sk/. If you drop the
                            > C in German and Dutch SCH spellings, you're left with SH, which then
                            > agrees with English. I don't myself care for C, partly because it has
                            > so many diverse pronunciations in various languages. (/k/, /s/, /ts/,
                            > /C/, /S/)

                            Afrikaans still uses /sk/, in skool, skrywe... where Dutch has sch, which
                            makes school and schrijven. (English school and write)

                            To me, shool en shrijven looks awful.

                            By the way, final -sk and -sch have become -s in Dutch and Afrikaans,
                            everywhere in speech and also in most cases in written form. Only Dutch still
                            writes -isch (/i:s/), where Afrikaans writes -ies.

                            About the C: it can sometimes have advantages: stems need to change less if
                            you make pairs like product/procucieren, kommunication/kommunicieren or
                            whatever, instead of produkt/produsieren and kommunikation/kommunisieren.

                            Furthermore, both English and Dutch have the C, and in the Netherlands
                            manypeople don't like k-spellings too much - kultuur looks too
                            National-Socialistic to them.

                            --
                            GMX - Die Kommunikationsplattform im Internet.
                            http://www.gmx.net
                          • Xipirho
                            ... I think it was fisc in OE, and said [fIS], so there! :-) ... Why not use c for [x] in Duttx? ... Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 27, 2002
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                              On Saturday, July 27, 2002, at 07:14 AM, Hans Kamp wrote:

                              >
                              >
                              >> -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
                              >> Van: wordwulf [mailto:eparsels@...]
                              >> Verzonden: zaterdag 27 juli 2002 5:48
                              >> Aan: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
                              >> Onderwerp: [folkspraak] Re: PanGermanic
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> --- In folkspraak@y..., bribri56@a... wrote:
                              >>> In a message dated 7/25/02 8:58:27 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                              >>> eparsels@n... writes:
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >>>> Ja, ik denke okso dat vi shulle net vare for myk ren mid de
                              >> Germansh
                              >>>> ding. De moderne germansh spraken have en del fremd vorden ond
                              >> dat
                              >>>> are net en problem. Men um have vi en god germansh vord, ik denke
                              >> dat
                              >>>> vi shulle bruke it.
                              >>>>
                              >>>
                              >>> Erik, do you really prefer the use of "h" in words like "Germansh"?
                              >> I once
                              >>> lobbied for using "c" in situations where the Germanic language
                              >> variations in
                              >>> equivalent terms are "c", "ch","k", "g" and/or "h". But since it
                              >> seemed that
                              >>> most users preferred "k", I changed my Folkspraak vocabulary to use
                              >> "k", and
                              >>> I'm getting used to it. Are you just trying out the "h" option to
                              >> see if it
                              >>> floats?
                              >>>
                              >>> Hab en god Dag!
                              >>> Brian
                              >>>
                              >>> Yeah, you're right; I have just been trying it out to see what
                              >> people thought of it. It has the advantage of indicating a
                              >> pronunciation /S/ that is current among what seems to be the majority
                              >> of Germanic speakers in words with an original /sk/.
                              >
                              > Yes, there are many Germanic languages that have (or had) /sk/. For
                              > example
                              > "fish". In German it is "Fisch" /fIS/, in Dutch "vis" /vIs/, in English
                              > "fish" /fIS/, in Old English "fisk" /fIsk/,

                              I think it was "fisc" in OE, and said [fIS], so there! :-)

                              > in Scandinavian languages "fisk"
                              > /fisk/. Words that starts with "sch" have their earlier versions with "sk"
                              > :
                              > in Dutch "school" /sxo:l/, in German "Schule" /"Su:l@/, in Afrikaans
                              > "skool"
                              > /skU@l/. The variation of spelling are all sch, s, sh and sk.
                              >
                              >> If you drop the
                              >> C in German and Dutch SCH spellings, you're left with SH, which then
                              >> agrees with English. I don't myself care for C, partly because it has
                              >> so many diverse pronunciations in various languages. (/k/, /s/, /ts/,
                              >> /C/, /S/)
                              >
                              > Yes, c has different sounds. In Dutch c (not followed by an h) only are in
                              > words that has a non-Germanic origin. In such cases c is pronounced as s
                              > only, only when it is followed by e, i or y. In other cases it is
                              > pronounced
                              > as s. In combination (ch) it is pronounced as /x/ only in pure Germanic
                              > words like "kachel" /"kAx@l/.

                              Why not use "c" for [x] in Duttx?

                              >
                              >> On the flip side, though, SH has its drawbacks. It represents a
                              >> single phoneme /S/ by means of two characters: SK, rather than the
                              >> more straightforward /sk/ represented by SK. I also find that I don't
                              >> like the look of words like germansh, for some reason, preferring
                              >> germansk, even though the /sk/ pronunciation isn't as widespread. In
                              >> being a straightforward representation of the two phonemes, SK has the
                              >> edge in transparency and simplicity, plus the added bonus of being
                              >> closer to the original proto-Germanic form.
                              >>
                              >> So I think I'll go back to the SK spelling.
                              >
                              > I think you are right about this. SK is pretty often used in my examples
                              > above.
                              >
                              > Hans Kamp.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Browse the draft word lists!
                              > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
                              > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
                              >
                              > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
                              > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
                              >
                              >
                              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • wordwulf
                              ... majority ... the ... then ... has ... /ts/, ... which ... Afrikaans, ... Dutch still ... less if ... or ... kommunikation/kommunisieren. ... Netherlands
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jul 27, 2002
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                                --- In folkspraak@y..., Daan Goedkoop <dgoedkoop@g...> wrote:
                                > > > Yeah, you're right; I have just been trying it out to see what
                                > > people thought of it. It has the advantage of indicating a
                                > > pronunciation /S/ that is current among what seems to be the
                                majority
                                > > of Germanic speakers in words with an original /sk/. If you drop
                                the
                                > > C in German and Dutch SCH spellings, you're left with SH, which
                                then
                                > > agrees with English. I don't myself care for C, partly because it
                                has
                                > > so many diverse pronunciations in various languages. (/k/, /s/,
                                /ts/,
                                > > /C/, /S/)
                                >
                                > Afrikaans still uses /sk/, in skool, skrywe... where Dutch has sch,
                                which
                                > makes school and schrijven. (English school and write)
                                >
                                > To me, shool en shrijven looks awful.
                                >
                                > By the way, final -sk and -sch have become -s in Dutch and
                                Afrikaans,
                                > everywhere in speech and also in most cases in written form. Only
                                Dutch still
                                > writes -isch (/i:s/), where Afrikaans writes -ies.
                                >
                                > About the C: it can sometimes have advantages: stems need to change
                                less if
                                > you make pairs like product/procucieren, kommunication/kommunicieren
                                or
                                > whatever, instead of produkt/produsieren and
                                kommunikation/kommunisieren.
                                >
                                > Furthermore, both English and Dutch have the C, and in the
                                Netherlands
                                > manypeople don't like k-spellings too much - kultuur looks too
                                > National-Socialistic to them.

                                Yeah, what to do with produkt/produsere...Well, one thing we could try
                                to do is avoid words like that altogether. Make/making. Or, we could
                                use the c, just as some of the Germanic languages already do
                                product/producere. Or we could just live with the alternations
                                produkt/produsere. Or we could return to the oldest Latin
                                pronunciation of these romance roots and do produkt/produkere. I
                                guess I would prefer to use k or s wherever possible, use a native
                                Germanic word wherever possible and perhaps have half a dozen
                                exceptions that use c. And although I detest the Nazis bitterly
                                myself, I guess kultur doesn't have that ring for me. I guess I could
                                live with c though, if the majority wants it. After all, I don't
                                think any of the Germanic languages have actually suppressed it.
                                English uses it heavily, as does Swedish, and even German uses it in
                                combinations like sch, ch and ck. We could just use it wherever the
                                majority of the source languages agree on including c.

                                Erik
                                >
                                > --
                                > GMX - Die Kommunikationsplattform im Internet.
                                > http://www.gmx.net
                              • Xipirho
                                No no no! Make it alphabetical! Use c or k for [k] ALWAYS, and then the one you haven t used for this, use for [C]/[x]. English actually favours c over
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jul 28, 2002
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                                  No no no! Make it alphabetical! Use "c" or "k" for [k] ALWAYS, and then
                                  the one you haven't used for this, use for [C]/[x]. English actually
                                  favours "c" over "k" and only uses "k" infront of e and i - i don't think
                                  they had "k" in OE at all, did they? Use "s" for [s] and "z" for [z]. Why
                                  not just use a phrase like "made thing" for "product"? Product makes no
                                  sense when translated back to latin really!

                                  On Sunday, July 28, 2002, at 04:08 AM, wordwulf wrote:

                                  > --- In folkspraak@y..., Daan Goedkoop <dgoedkoop@g...> wrote:
                                  >>>> Yeah, you're right; I have just been trying it out to see what
                                  >>> people thought of it. It has the advantage of indicating a
                                  >>> pronunciation /S/ that is current among what seems to be the
                                  > majority
                                  >>> of Germanic speakers in words with an original /sk/. If you drop
                                  > the
                                  >>> C in German and Dutch SCH spellings, you're left with SH, which
                                  > then
                                  >>> agrees with English. I don't myself care for C, partly because it
                                  > has
                                  >>> so many diverse pronunciations in various languages. (/k/, /s/,
                                  > /ts/,
                                  >>> /C/, /S/)
                                  >>
                                  >> Afrikaans still uses /sk/, in skool, skrywe... where Dutch has sch,
                                  > which
                                  >> makes school and schrijven. (English school and write)
                                  >>
                                  >> To me, shool en shrijven looks awful.
                                  >>
                                  >> By the way, final -sk and -sch have become -s in Dutch and
                                  > Afrikaans,
                                  >> everywhere in speech and also in most cases in written form. Only
                                  > Dutch still
                                  >> writes -isch (/i:s/), where Afrikaans writes -ies.
                                  >>
                                  >> About the C: it can sometimes have advantages: stems need to change
                                  > less if
                                  >> you make pairs like product/procucieren, kommunication/kommunicieren
                                  > or
                                  >> whatever, instead of produkt/produsieren and
                                  > kommunikation/kommunisieren.
                                  >>
                                  >> Furthermore, both English and Dutch have the C, and in the
                                  > Netherlands
                                  >> manypeople don't like k-spellings too much - kultuur looks too
                                  >> National-Socialistic to them.
                                  >
                                  > Yeah, what to do with produkt/produsere...Well, one thing we could try
                                  > to do is avoid words like that altogether. Make/making. Or, we could
                                  > use the c, just as some of the Germanic languages already do
                                  > product/producere. Or we could just live with the alternations
                                  > produkt/produsere. Or we could return to the oldest Latin
                                  > pronunciation of these romance roots and do produkt/produkere. I
                                  > guess I would prefer to use k or s wherever possible, use a native
                                  > Germanic word wherever possible and perhaps have half a dozen
                                  > exceptions that use c. And although I detest the Nazis bitterly
                                  > myself, I guess kultur doesn't have that ring for me. I guess I could
                                  > live with c though, if the majority wants it. After all, I don't
                                  > think any of the Germanic languages have actually suppressed it.
                                  > English uses it heavily, as does Swedish, and even German uses it in
                                  > combinations like sch, ch and ck. We could just use it wherever the
                                  > majority of the source languages agree on including c.
                                  >
                                  > Erik
                                  >>
                                  >> --
                                  >> GMX - Die Kommunikationsplattform im Internet.
                                  >> http://www.gmx.net
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Browse the draft word lists!
                                  > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
                                  > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
                                  >
                                  > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
                                  > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  Liv long and prospx, Khjpjrho (Xipirho)/Rxwlj (Roly).


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Abrigon Gusiq
                                  Hood question Linus.. Dictionary of all into/out of English might be fun to see.. Especially with terms of a modern nature, be it IT to medical science? LOL
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jun 19, 2011
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                                    Hood question Linus..

                                    Dictionary of all into/out of English might be fun to see..

                                    Especially with terms of a modern nature, be it IT to medical science? LOL
                                    into Folksprak?

                                    Mike
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