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Wales/Welsh

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  • Abrigon Gusiq
    Yeppers, Welsh and Wales are English words for the people who are called Cymru or Cymri.. Atleast one of their names for themselves and their language. And it
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 22, 2002
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      Yeppers, Welsh and Wales are English words for the people who are called
      Cymru or Cymri.. Atleast one of their names for themselves and their
      language.

      And it meant foreigner or like meaning..

      Deutch/Touton?

      Mike
    • wordwulf
      ... called ... Ja, Modern Deutsch (English version Dutch , as in Pennsylvania Dutch, meaning Pennsylvania German) comes from *(th)iudisk, a word related to
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 22, 2002
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        --- In folkspraak@y..., Abrigon Gusiq <abrigon@y...> wrote:
        > Yeppers, Welsh and Wales are English words for the people who are
        called
        > Cymru or Cymri.. Atleast one of their names for themselves and their
        > language.
        >
        > And it meant foreigner or like meaning..
        >
        > Deutch/Touton?
        >
        > Mike

        Ja, Modern Deutsch (English version "Dutch", as in Pennsylvania
        Dutch, meaning Pennsylvania German) comes from *(th)iudisk, a word
        related to Irish tuatha and originally meaning something like 'the
        people', which has been a common way for various tribes all over the
        world to refer to themselves. The Old English form was (th)eod and
        the Old Norse form was (th)jo(dh). (Sorry, I guess I should use SAMPA
        if I can't use eth and thorn characters, but I'm too lazy to look them
        up right now). The Romans referred to a tribe they called the
        Teutones, which may have come from the same word or not. That
        Latin word is the origin of our modern English words teuton and
        teutonic, borrowed back in its Latin form.
        The Old English form of Wales was wealas, and it meant 'foreigners'.
        That root also happens to be the origin of the word "walnut", the
        'foreign nut', which originally didn't grow inside the territory of
        the Germanic languages.
        Erik
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