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Re: [folkspraak] romance and other foreign words in FS?

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  • bribri56@aol.com
    There are so many international words that are shared by all (except Icelandic) the Germanic speaking countries, that I think Folkspraak should exploit them.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 10, 2002
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      There are so many international words that are shared by all (except
      Icelandic) the Germanic speaking countries, that I think Folkspraak should
      exploit them. As in English, I see no essential problem with having both a
      Germanic based word and a non-Germanic (usually Latinate or Greek) based word
      for the same object or concept.

      Here are some examples, and the issues they bring up:

      Afrikaans - akkumulator, battery
      Dutch - accu, accumulator
      English - accumulator, battery
      German - Akku, Akkumulator, Stromspeicher
      Danish - akkumulator
      Norwegian - akkumulator
      Swedish - batteri
      Folkspraak - Akkumulator, Battery (perhaps Batterij or Batteri).
      Stromspiker(?) would be an isolate, so ignored if it had no relatives outside
      German.

      but .......
      Afrikaans - ammeter, ampèremeter
      Dutch - ampèremeter, stroommeter
      English - ammeter
      German - Ampèremeter, Strommesser
      Norwegian - amperemeter
      Folkspraak - Amperemeter, Strommeter.

      The use of Strommeter recalls the German Stromspeicher. If you use the one,
      shouldn't you use the other? Or should you leave out the German based words
      because there are more universal non-Germanic terms?

      Af - abnormaal
      Du - abnormaal
      En - abnormal
      Ge - abnormal
      Da - abnorm, unormal
      No - abnorm, unormal
      Sw - abnorm
      FS - Abnormal. Un- (Scand. U-) is the appropriate Germanic prefix. But the
      non-Germanic 'normal' is still universal. Should we impose the hybrid
      Unnormal? It would be understood in English, but would look and sound
      abnormal/unnormal!

      Af- biblioteek
      Du - bibliotheek, boekerij
      En - library
      Ge- Bibliothek
      Da -bibliotek
      No - bibliotek
      Sw - bibliotek
      FS - Bibliotek. But Bokery (En neologism - 'bookery') sounds cool to me.

      Af - blank, wit
      Du - blanco, blank, wit, oningevuld
      En - blank, white
      Ge - weiss
      Da - hvid
      No - hvit
      Sw - blank, vit
      FS - Wit (?), Blank.

      In this case the foreign 'blank' occupies overlapping semantic space with the
      Germanic wit/white/weiss/hvid/hvit/vit. Are both terms useful, or do we throw
      out 'Blank'?

      Af - bioskoop, fliekhuis
      Du - bioscoop, cinema
      En - cinema, movie theatre (obs. biograph)
      Ge - Kino
      Da -biograf
      No - kino
      Sw - biograf
      FS - Biograf, Kino, Bioskop. All of these are 'foreign'. I think Flikhus
      (English 'Flickhouse') would be cool, using the Afrikaans term as the basis.
      But it would be obscure, even in S. Africa.

      When it comes to medicine and science, I think there's no way around using
      Latin and Greek based terms much (not all) of the time. I think that creating
      the Germanic-based Folkspraak equivalents is a lot of fun, though. I just
      don't see them catching on outside our little circle.


      Always thinking,
      Brian
    • anorak222
      Hi, ... relatives outside German. Stromspeicher is not a common word in German. But Batterie is. ... Blank is Germanic too. French blanc , Italian
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 10, 2002
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        Hi,

        --- In folkspraak@y..., bribri56@a... wrote:
        > Afrikaans - akkumulator, battery
        > Dutch - accu, accumulator
        > English - accumulator, battery
        > German - Akku, Akkumulator, Stromspeicher
        > Danish - akkumulator
        > Norwegian - akkumulator
        > Swedish - batteri
        > Folkspraak - Akkumulator, Battery (perhaps Batterij or Batteri).
        > Stromspiker(?) would be an isolate, so ignored if it had no
        relatives outside German.

        "Stromspeicher" is not a common word in German. But "Batterie" is.

        > Af - blank, wit
        > Du - blanco, blank, wit, oningevuld
        > En - blank, white
        > Ge - weiss
        > Da - hvid
        > No - hvit
        > Sw - blank, vit
        > FS - Wit (?), Blank.
        >
        > In this case the foreign 'blank' occupies overlapping semantic
        > space with the Germanic wit/white/weiss/hvid/hvit/vit. Are both
        > terms useful, or do we throw out 'Blank'?

        "Blank" is Germanic too. French "blanc", Italian "bianco" are
        actually loans from Germanic, not vice versa.

        Regards
      • bribri56@aol.com
        Thanks for the clarification! Akkumulater and Battery work for me! And I didn t bother looking up the etymology of blank et al. I just knew it is present in
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 10, 2002
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          Thanks for the clarification! Akkumulater and Battery work for me! And I
          didn't bother looking up the etymology of blank et al. I just knew it is
          present in several Romance languages in some form, so figured it was from
          Latin. Further evidence of the natural cross-pollination of language groupsI.

          It looks like we're all agreeing that commonality takes precedence over
          'Germanic-ness' in our word formations.

          til necst tid,
          Brian

          In a message dated 7/10/02 10:55:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
          wolfi.junkmail@... writes:


          >
          > "Stromspeicher" is not a common word in German. But "Batterie" is.
          >
          >
          > "Blank" is Germanic too. French "blanc", Italian "bianco" are
          > actually loans from Germanic, not vice versa.
          >



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