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Re: Re: [folkspraak] Ge-

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  • bonesplitter@email.com
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    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 29, 2002
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Daan" <dgoedkoop@...>
      Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 16:53:43 +0100
      To: "folkspraak@yahoogroups.com" <folkspraak@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Re: Re: [folkspraak] Ge-


      > 2002-06-17im
      >
      > bribri56 v�m�t�g�cen:
      >
      > >Question:
      > >How do German, Dutch, and the Scandinavian languages make use of the ge-
      > >prefix or its national equivalent? I thought that English and Swe/Dan/Nor had
      > >abandoned it, (with a few anachronistic exceptions) and that it is less
      > >important in Dutch than in German. Is this prefix really a necessary aid in
      > >understanding the meaning of a word?
      >
      > Not really, but Dutch (and German) always use it in the perfective.
      >
      > Daan (dgoedkoop@...).
      >
      >

      I actually thin kthat the Ge prefix does make german and dutch much easier to read, you are never in doubt about what it means with a ge prefix, and it does mean that you actually wouldn't have to change the word's ending, and stem if you get me, ( of course this isn't the case in german and dutch where they do sometimes changes what comes after the Ge)

      IN danish we have about a million ways of contructing the perfect tense, which can be very disturbing for foreign people wanting to learn Danish. so here is another plus for the ge, it is eassier for other people to leran, and considering that their aren't one person on this planet with Folkspraak as mother tounge, the learnability of the spraak ought to be in focus.

      But however, if you put in the Ge prefix in Folkspraak we have a language wich reminds a little to much of German and dutch, considering that pronounciation is allready like in german and that we use bine instaed of "er" or "are" so i order to make this a launguage for all speakers of the germanic laungauges not only Germans and dutch, i say abbandon the ge-prefix, but preserve the german word order with the perfect tense in the end of the sentence.

      By the way are there an up to date grammer to Folksraap somewhere? if there isn't would anybody please tell me how it works nowa days

      regards Christian-
      --
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    • anorak222
      ... Is bine settled already? Damn I missed that. I only read the list intermittently, servers me right. ... I agree with your notion of not making the
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 4, 2002
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        --- In folkspraak@y..., bonesplitter@e... wrote:

        > But however, if you put in the Ge prefix in Folkspraak we have a
        >language wich reminds a little to much of German and dutch,
        >considering that pronounciation is allready like in german and that
        >we use bine instaed of "er" or "are"

        Is "bine" settled already? Damn I missed that. I only read the list
        intermittently, servers me right.

        >so i order to make this a launguage for all speakers of the
        >germanic laungauges not only Germans and dutch, i say abbandon the
        >ge-prefix, but preserve the german word order with the perfect
        >tense in the end of the sentence.

        I agree with your notion of not making the language "too German", but
        I'd have preferred the reverse compromise: Scandinavian/English "er"
        or "ar" for "to be", participles with German/Dutch "ge-" prefix. I
        dislike "bine" for various reasons (sounds awkward, not intuitive),
        but I like "ge-" for the reasons posted by others. But if it's
        settled, I'm late I guess ...

        Regards

        wolfgang
      • bribri56@aol.com
        Don t worry Wolfie - in the posts ER or AR seems to be winning out over BINE or variants thereof.
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 4, 2002
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          Don't worry Wolfie - in the posts ER or AR seems to be winning out over BINE
          or variants thereof.
        • bonesplitter@email.com
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          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 10, 2002
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: bribri56@...
            Date: Fri, 5 Jul 2002 00:39:16 EDT
            To: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [folkspraak] Ge-


            > Don't worry Wolfie - in the posts ER or AR seems to be winning out over BINE
            > or variants thereof.
            >

            that sounds nice i think, it gives the language more of a soul if everything doesn't goe by the rules, it would seem that folkspraak is becoming increasingly irreguellar or am i wrong ?
            but still i would like somesort of a list of rules and words which isn't as outdated as the one on the folspraak institut.
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          • hanskamp2001
            ... net ... gebreke ... gepakke ... I would like to use the prefix ge- for building participles not for changing the meaning of infinitives: Ete - geeted = eat
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 23, 2002
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              --- In folkspraak@y..., "wordwulf" <eparsels@n...> wrote:
              > Goddag folksprakeren,
              > Ik denke dat vi skulle bruke de ge- prefiks for perfektiv verben,
              net
              > for de perfektiv partisipel.
              > To bispel: ete 'to eat', geete 'to eat up', Breke 'to break',
              gebreke
              > 'to break up/break to pieces', pakke 'to pack (something)',
              gepakke
              > 'to pack up completely', bruke 'to use', gebruke 'to use up/make
              > thorough use of'.
              > Vat denke ji um dis ide?

              I would like to use the prefix ge- for building participles not for
              changing the meaning of infinitives:

              Ete - geeted = eat - eaten.
              Breke - gebreked = break - broken.
              Pakke - gepakked = pack - packed.
              Bruke - gebruked = use - used.
              Etc.

              Hans Kamp.
            • hanskamp2001
              ... the ge- ... Swe/Dan/Nor had ... less ... necessary aid in ... In Dutch ge- is used to build participles when there isn t already another prefix: Eten -
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 23, 2002
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                --- In folkspraak@y..., bribri56@a... wrote:
                > Question:
                > How do German, Dutch, and the Scandinavian languages make use of
                the ge-
                > prefix or its national equivalent? I thought that English and
                Swe/Dan/Nor had
                > abandoned it, (with a few anachronistic exceptions) and that it is
                less
                > important in Dutch than in German. Is this prefix really a
                necessary aid in
                > understanding the meaning of a word?

                In Dutch ge- is used to build participles when there isn't already
                another prefix:
                Eten - gegeten (only here a g is inserted) = eat - eaten;
                Maken - gemaakt = make - made;
                Doen - gedaan = do - done;
                Praten - gepraat = talk - talked.
                Even in case of verbs ending with -eren, that are often from Romanic
                origin:
                Telefoneren - getelefoneerd = phone - phoned;
                Proberen - geprobeerd = try - tried;
                Discussiëren - gediscussieerd = discuss/argue - discussed/argued;

                But:
                Beginnen - begonnen = begin - begun.
                Verhullen - verhuld = hide - hidden.

                In German ge- is used to build participles only when the verb has a
                Germanic origin and doesn't end with -ieren:
                Essen - gegessen = eat - eaten.
                Machen - gemacht = make - made.
                Tun - getan = do - done.
                Sprechen - gesprochen = speak - spoken.

                But:
                Telefonieren - telefoniert = phone - phoned;
                Diskutieren - diskutiert = discuss - discussed.

                The same in Afrikaans:
                Eet - geëet = eat - eaten.
                Maak - gemaak = make - made.
                Doen - gedoen = do - done.
                Praat - gepraat = talk - talked.

                I don't know what Afrikaans does with words from Romanic origin:
                ending with -eer;
                Telefoneer - (ge)telefoneer = phone - phoned;
                Probeer - (ge)probeer = try - tried.

                Hans Kamp.
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