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Re: Afrikaans (Cape Dutch, kitchen Dutch)

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  • David
    One think I don t like about Afrikaans, and think is something that Folksprak should not do: In Germanic languages, past tenses are very often made by adding
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 27, 2013
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      One think I don't like about Afrikaans, and think is something that Folksprak should not do:

      In Germanic languages, past tenses are very often made by adding some kind of suffix with a dental stop to the verb stem. (-ed, -t etc). EXCEPT for Afrikaans. Afrikaans has done away with this and instead marks past tenses with a ge- suffix. This is an additional (ie redundant) perfect participle marker in Dutch and German. But other Germanic languages (Such as English and North Germanic) don't do this at all.
      If you included Afrikaans as source language and tried to build a lowest-common-denominator language you would find there is no lowest common denominator way to make past tenses in Germanic languages. (Mind you, this is similar problem to making plurals for nouns, there is no totally common system for doing this)

      Also Afrikaans' adjective declension system is every bit as complicated as Dutch -- if not more complicated and irregular.

      English creoles such as Bislama, Tok Pisin and Sranan are also very simple in grammar and are recognizably Germanic too (for me, a speaker of English, the largest Germanic language)

      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Erik" wrote:
      >
      > Sorry, probably that was wrong expression. Thats why I did mark it with inverted comma(""). Let it call "best practice due to difficult circumstances in history". (Language) simplification often seems to happen that way.
      >
      > regards, Erik
      >
      > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Jarrette wrote:
      > >
      > > Don't know what you mean by "enforced" simplification of "some Germanic language".  Isn't the simplified language Dutch?  And isn't it a naturally evolved simplification, not "enforced"?  Did you borrow that phrase from somewhere else?
      > >  
      > > Actually, I think Afrikaans itself would make a pretty good intergermanic auxlang, precisely because it's so simple and easy, yet is clearly Germanic.
      > >  
      > > Andrew
      > >
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Erik
      > > To: folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2013 5:55:10 AM
      > > Subject: [folkspraak] Afrikaans (Cape Dutch, kitchen Dutch)
      > >
      > > Hey,
      > >
      > > http://www.pagef30.com/search/label/language%20learning%20tips
      > >
      > > "...Afrikaans with almost completely regular verb conjugation, no cases (except in pronouns) and no grammatical gender would probably require less from the student compared with German..."
      > >
      > > Being non-linguistic that sounds like "enforced simplification (Cape Dutch, kitchen Dutch)" of some Germanic language. Maybe that could be useful to put some Germanic conlang ideas out of?
      > >
      > > regards, Erik
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
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