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Re: The Goths

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  • adam.skoog
    You are mixing up your brackets here. Icelandic is not , but it is indeed /aU/. Swedish is not , but it is indeed /o/. Anyhow, what I meant to
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 13, 2011
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      You are mixing up your brackets here. Icelandic <á> is not <au>, but it is indeed /aU/. Swedish <å> is not <o>, but it is indeed /o/.

      Anyhow, what I meant to say was simply that <å> has a different history than <æ ä> and <ø œ ö>.

      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yeah, maybe over 1000 years ago it was long <a>, but it became a kind of long <o> sound, even in Icelandic it's <au>. The spelling remained <aa> for a while until it became <å>, and so that's tradition now and probably will stay like that for ever, no problem of course but that doesn't mean it's logical, but historical it is.
      >
      > In the Low Saxon language of the Netherlands, the spelling <ao> is used for the same darkened sound [O:], derived from old long <a>, whereas <a>/<aa> is used for a real long [a:] sound, mostly derived from old short <a>, which was lengthened later.
      > So we have [O:] in words like "gaon", "slaopen", "laot" with old long <a>, but [a:] in "water", "maak", "later" with old short <a>.
      >
      > In most of Low Saxon in Germany, both sounds became identical as dark [O:], but are spelled with <a>/<aa>:
      > "gaan", "slapen", "laat", "water", "maak", "later" etc.
      >
      > NB: <aa> is used in closed syllables, <a> in open ones, for [a:]
      >
      >
      > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
      > >
      > > <aa> seems logical to me, as <å> is derived from a long <a>. <oe> and <ae> (and <ue>, in German) have their own history.
      > >
      > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA.
      > > > Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when Æ becomes AE, why wouldn't Å become AO?
      > > >
      > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Probably. Hopefully.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
      > > > > > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
      > > > > > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
      > > > > > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
      > > > > > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
      > > > > > > > > > long gone.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
      > > > > > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
      > > > > > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • chamavian
      oh ok, mixed up me brackets, sorry mate, that was like dumb of me.
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 15, 2011
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        oh ok, mixed up me brackets, sorry mate, that was like dumb of me.




        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@...> wrote:
        >
        > You are mixing up your brackets here. Icelandic <á> is not <au>, but it is indeed /aU/. Swedish <å> is not <o>, but it is indeed /o/.
        >
        > Anyhow, what I meant to say was simply that <å> has a different history than <æ ä> and <ø œ ö>.
        >
        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Yeah, maybe over 1000 years ago it was long <a>, but it became a kind of long <o> sound, even in Icelandic it's <au>. The spelling remained <aa> for a while until it became <å>, and so that's tradition now and probably will stay like that for ever, no problem of course but that doesn't mean it's logical, but historical it is.
        > >
        > > In the Low Saxon language of the Netherlands, the spelling <ao> is used for the same darkened sound [O:], derived from old long <a>, whereas <a>/<aa> is used for a real long [a:] sound, mostly derived from old short <a>, which was lengthened later.
        > > So we have [O:] in words like "gaon", "slaopen", "laot" with old long <a>, but [a:] in "water", "maak", "later" with old short <a>.
        > >
        > > In most of Low Saxon in Germany, both sounds became identical as dark [O:], but are spelled with <a>/<aa>:
        > > "gaan", "slapen", "laat", "water", "maak", "later" etc.
        > >
        > > NB: <aa> is used in closed syllables, <a> in open ones, for [a:]
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > <aa> seems logical to me, as <å> is derived from a long <a>. <oe> and <ae> (and <ue>, in German) have their own history.
        > > >
        > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA.
        > > > > Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when Æ becomes AE, why wouldn't Å become AO?
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Probably. Hopefully.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
        > > > > > > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
        > > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
        > > > > > > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
        > > > > > > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
        > > > > > > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
        > > > > > > > > > > long gone.
        > > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
        > > > > > > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
        > > > > > > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
        > > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
        > > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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