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Re: [folkspraak] Re: Conjugation

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  • David Parke
    My opinion on this is except for Afrikaans, all Germanic languages form past tenses with suffixes with dental consonants. Afrikaans uses a ge- prefix, adapted
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 28, 2011
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      My opinion on this is except for Afrikaans, all Germanic languages form
      past tenses with suffixes with dental consonants.
      Afrikaans uses a ge- prefix, adapted from a the past participle prefix
      of Dutch. But not all Germanic languages use this ge- prefix for such a
      purpose. English and Scandy don't. So don't Frisian and some forms of
      Low Saxon.
      I'd rather see simple past tense forms made with a -ed type of suffix.
      So this would be still a bit inflected and non-analytic. Just so long as
      it's regular, I don't think it'd be any more more difficult to learn
      than a analytic particle or adverb for making past tenses.

      On 1/03/2011 18:59, chamavian wrote:
      >
      > Hei Bjorn Slesvisky! Datt iss god to have di torygg hir. Aer du OK?
      >
      > An Afrikaans-like grammar has been suggested several times before here
      > and may be a good idea.
      >
      > Actually many Folksprak grammar proposals have already several things
      > in common with it:
      >
      > FS articles have one form (as in English, as well), this does not
      > depend on gender as in German (3 basic forms + many cases), Dutch and
      > Scandinavian (2, for common and neuter gender).
      >
      > Adjectives always have the same form.
      >
      > Plural is formed regularly (in Afrikaans most often as well, however
      > this is not always obvious for non-Dutch speakers)
      >
      > FS verbs are usually regular, depends on the variety: some people want
      > irregular pasts, others (including myself) only regular ones.
      > Btw Afrikaans only has one past verb form left, a construction with to
      > have "hê ge-...",
      >
      > ek het gesien= I saw, I have seen (Dutch: ik heb gezien, ik zag)
      > jy het gewil = you wanted, have wanted (jij hebt gewild, jij wilde)
      > ons het gevra= we asked, have asked (we hebben gevraagd, we vroegen)
      >
      > etc.
      >
      > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "nordslesviger"
      > <nordslesviger@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi all - long time no see :-)
      > >
      > > It seems to me that a creole like grammar would be the most natural
      > solution. Conjugation with the help of participles is common whenever
      > people meet and develop a new language. Good examples are Afrikaans
      > and Negerhollands.
      > >
      > > Bjorn
      > >
      > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Yeah, we could use both... Maybe David's masterpiece can be used
      > as a starting point, it has to be rewritten and respelled into FS
      > anyway, and the FS pronunciation is different as well than the
      > Frenkish one.
      > > >
      > > > But there are a few things in Frenkish I don't find too fit for
      > Folksprak, especially the FK word order, in that case we can use the
      > Middelsprake example.
      > > >
      > > > And an important point of discussion remains the verb: regular or
      > irregular past and perfect etc.? In FK they are often irregular, in MS
      > almost always regular (as in Interlingua).
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "swartsaxon" <anjarrette@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Maybe we should talk about getting this grammar written. I feel
      > that the bulk of the work might end up on David's shoulders, since he
      > has already written his masterful Frenkisch grammar, and since he has
      > provided most of the vocabulary, and carries a lot of weight in the
      > Folksprak group. David's Frenkisch grammar could be used as a starting
      > point.
      > > > >
      > > > > But then Ingmar has already written his equally masterful
      > Middelsprake grammar and vocabulary, and perhaps this could be used as
      > a starting point for a Folksprak grammar.
      > > > >
      > > > > Or should we just start discussing it, and come to agreements?
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Andrew
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I'm too lazy as well - or don't I like your grammars too? ;-)
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Anyway a remark about your regular verb suggestion below:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > didn't we have separate singular and plural, such as
      > > > > >
      > > > > > HETE
      > > > > >
      > > > > > present:
      > > > > > -singular:
      > > > > > ek HET
      > > > > > du HET
      > > > > > hi/si/ett HET
      > > > > > -plural:
      > > > > > wi HETE
      > > > > > ji HETE
      > > > > > dee HETE
      > > > > >
      > > > > > past:
      > > > > > sing.: ek, du, hi HETED
      > > > > > plur.: wi, ji, dee HETEDE
      > > > > >
      > > > > > We have this sing.vs plural already in the very few irregular
      > verbs:
      > > > > > HI ISS vs WI AERE, and
      > > > > > HI HA vs WI HAVE
      > > > > > HI WAS vs WI WAERE
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Btw: I still don't like ISS for the first and second person
      > singular, so no EK *ISS or DU *ISS, my suggestion is:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > ek aer, du aer, hi iss, se iss, ett iss
      > > > > > wi aere, ji aere, dee aere
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Yes we need a grammar written (by someone other than me! I'm
      > too lazy at
      > > > > > > the moment and no one seems to like my grammars)
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Here's a suggestion for a normal regular verb such as hete.
      > > > > > > Infinitive: hete (to be called)
      > > > > > > Present: hete; ek hete, du hete, wi hete, ett hete
      > > > > > > Simple Past: hetede; ek hetede; si hetede etc.
      > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have heted; ek ha heted; wi have heted
      > > > > > > Present participle: hetend
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Wese is one of the few irregulars: Here's a suggestion;
      > > > > > > Infinitive: wese
      > > > > > > Present singular: iss; ek iss, du iss, hi iss
      > > > > > > Present plural: aere; we aere, ji aere, dee aere
      > > > > > > Simple Past Singular: was; ek was, du was, hi was
      > > > > > > Simple Past Plural: waere; wi waere; ji waere; dee waere
      > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have wesed; ek ha wesed, ji have wesed
      > > > > > > Present participle: wesend.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > On 20/02/2011 16:29, dibbs629 wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > How does one conjugate verbs?
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > How are the verb "wese" and "hete" conjugated, for example?
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
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      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • chamavian
      I agree, I ve always been in favor of the use of a suffix like -ed behind the verb stem for the past and perfect tense. So this is completely regular,
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 1, 2011
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        I agree, I've always been in favor of the use of a suffix like "-ed" behind the verb stem for the past and perfect tense. So this is completely regular, except for the verb "to be" and maybe "to have".
        In Middelsprake and also in my later Folksprak varieties, and now for "Common Folksprak" as well, of course.

        I'd also like to differentiate the singular and plural persons, just like in the present tense where plural is marked by a suffix "-e", so for the past the suffix would be "-ed" in sing., and "-ede" in plur.

        So:

        make = to make

        ek mak = I make
        ek maked = I made
        ek ha maked = I have made

        wi make = we make
        wi makede = we made
        wi have maked= we have made


        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@...> wrote:
        >
        > My opinion on this is except for Afrikaans, all Germanic languages form
        > past tenses with suffixes with dental consonants.
        > Afrikaans uses a ge- prefix, adapted from a the past participle prefix
        > of Dutch. But not all Germanic languages use this ge- prefix for such a
        > purpose. English and Scandy don't. So don't Frisian and some forms of
        > Low Saxon.
        > I'd rather see simple past tense forms made with a -ed type of suffix.
        > So this would be still a bit inflected and non-analytic. Just so long as
        > it's regular, I don't think it'd be any more more difficult to learn
        > than a analytic particle or adverb for making past tenses.
        >
        > On 1/03/2011 18:59, chamavian wrote:
        > >
        > > Hei Bjorn Slesvisky! Datt iss god to have di torygg hir. Aer du OK?
        > >
        > > An Afrikaans-like grammar has been suggested several times before here
        > > and may be a good idea.
        > >
        > > Actually many Folksprak grammar proposals have already several things
        > > in common with it:
        > >
        > > FS articles have one form (as in English, as well), this does not
        > > depend on gender as in German (3 basic forms + many cases), Dutch and
        > > Scandinavian (2, for common and neuter gender).
        > >
        > > Adjectives always have the same form.
        > >
        > > Plural is formed regularly (in Afrikaans most often as well, however
        > > this is not always obvious for non-Dutch speakers)
        > >
        > > FS verbs are usually regular, depends on the variety: some people want
        > > irregular pasts, others (including myself) only regular ones.
        > > Btw Afrikaans only has one past verb form left, a construction with to
        > > have "hê ge-...",
        > >
        > > ek het gesien= I saw, I have seen (Dutch: ik heb gezien, ik zag)
        > > jy het gewil = you wanted, have wanted (jij hebt gewild, jij wilde)
        > > ons het gevra= we asked, have asked (we hebben gevraagd, we vroegen)
        > >
        > > etc.
        > >
        > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "nordslesviger"
        > > <nordslesviger@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi all - long time no see :-)
        > > >
        > > > It seems to me that a creole like grammar would be the most natural
        > > solution. Conjugation with the help of participles is common whenever
        > > people meet and develop a new language. Good examples are Afrikaans
        > > and Negerhollands.
        > > >
        > > > Bjorn
        > > >
        > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Yeah, we could use both... Maybe David's masterpiece can be used
        > > as a starting point, it has to be rewritten and respelled into FS
        > > anyway, and the FS pronunciation is different as well than the
        > > Frenkish one.
        > > > >
        > > > > But there are a few things in Frenkish I don't find too fit for
        > > Folksprak, especially the FK word order, in that case we can use the
        > > Middelsprake example.
        > > > >
        > > > > And an important point of discussion remains the verb: regular or
        > > irregular past and perfect etc.? In FK they are often irregular, in MS
        > > almost always regular (as in Interlingua).
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "swartsaxon" <anjarrette@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Maybe we should talk about getting this grammar written. I feel
        > > that the bulk of the work might end up on David's shoulders, since he
        > > has already written his masterful Frenkisch grammar, and since he has
        > > provided most of the vocabulary, and carries a lot of weight in the
        > > Folksprak group. David's Frenkisch grammar could be used as a starting
        > > point.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > But then Ingmar has already written his equally masterful
        > > Middelsprake grammar and vocabulary, and perhaps this could be used as
        > > a starting point for a Folksprak grammar.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Or should we just start discussing it, and come to agreements?
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Andrew
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I'm too lazy as well - or don't I like your grammars too? ;-)
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Anyway a remark about your regular verb suggestion below:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > didn't we have separate singular and plural, such as
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > HETE
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > present:
        > > > > > > -singular:
        > > > > > > ek HET
        > > > > > > du HET
        > > > > > > hi/si/ett HET
        > > > > > > -plural:
        > > > > > > wi HETE
        > > > > > > ji HETE
        > > > > > > dee HETE
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > past:
        > > > > > > sing.: ek, du, hi HETED
        > > > > > > plur.: wi, ji, dee HETEDE
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > We have this sing.vs plural already in the very few irregular
        > > verbs:
        > > > > > > HI ISS vs WI AERE, and
        > > > > > > HI HA vs WI HAVE
        > > > > > > HI WAS vs WI WAERE
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Btw: I still don't like ISS for the first and second person
        > > singular, so no EK *ISS or DU *ISS, my suggestion is:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > ek aer, du aer, hi iss, se iss, ett iss
        > > > > > > wi aere, ji aere, dee aere
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Yes we need a grammar written (by someone other than me! I'm
        > > too lazy at
        > > > > > > > the moment and no one seems to like my grammars)
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Here's a suggestion for a normal regular verb such as hete.
        > > > > > > > Infinitive: hete (to be called)
        > > > > > > > Present: hete; ek hete, du hete, wi hete, ett hete
        > > > > > > > Simple Past: hetede; ek hetede; si hetede etc.
        > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have heted; ek ha heted; wi have heted
        > > > > > > > Present participle: hetend
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Wese is one of the few irregulars: Here's a suggestion;
        > > > > > > > Infinitive: wese
        > > > > > > > Present singular: iss; ek iss, du iss, hi iss
        > > > > > > > Present plural: aere; we aere, ji aere, dee aere
        > > > > > > > Simple Past Singular: was; ek was, du was, hi was
        > > > > > > > Simple Past Plural: waere; wi waere; ji waere; dee waere
        > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have wesed; ek ha wesed, ji have wesed
        > > > > > > > Present participle: wesend.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > On 20/02/2011 16:29, dibbs629 wrote:
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > How does one conjugate verbs?
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > How are the verb "wese" and "hete" conjugated, for example?
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > > > > > > > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
        > > > > > > > > Version: 8.5.449 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3454 - Release
        > > Date: 02/19/11 19:33:00
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
        > > Version: 8.5.449 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3474 - Release Date: 02/28/11 19:34:00
        > >
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      • nordslesviger
        Moin moin Ingmar. Dank einiger tägliche Dosis der Medizin geht es gut. Ich hoffe, du bist auch in Ordnung. Während meiner Abwesenheit habe ich som Genealogie
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 1, 2011
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          Moin moin Ingmar.
          Dank einiger tägliche Dosis der Medizin geht es gut. Ich hoffe, du bist auch in Ordnung.

          Während meiner Abwesenheit habe ich som Genealogie Studien durchgeführt. Es zeigt, dass neben Nordschleswiger bin ich auch Ostfriesischen.

          Well, David are right a simple past is common to most Germanic languages so it is a natural solution to have the same in FS.

          But I find it quite interesting that several Germanic languages have lost the simple past and form past tense with forms of "to have". Thist is not only in Africans, but also in Negerhollands (or Hoch Kreol to awoid the N-word) and Yiddish, so I think we see a trend here.

          Tschüs

          Björn




          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hei Bjorn Slesvisky! Datt iss god to have di torygg hir. Aer du OK?
          >
          > An Afrikaans-like grammar has been suggested several times before here and may be a good idea.
          >
          > Actually many Folksprak grammar proposals have already several things in common with it:
          >
          > FS articles have one form (as in English, as well), this does not depend on gender as in German (3 basic forms + many cases), Dutch and Scandinavian (2, for common and neuter gender).
          >
          > Adjectives always have the same form.
          >
          > Plural is formed regularly (in Afrikaans most often as well, however this is not always obvious for non-Dutch speakers)
          >
          > FS verbs are usually regular, depends on the variety: some people want irregular pasts, others (including myself) only regular ones.
          > Btw Afrikaans only has one past verb form left, a construction with to have "hê ge-...",
          >
          > ek het gesien= I saw, I have seen (Dutch: ik heb gezien, ik zag)
          > jy het gewil = you wanted, have wanted (jij hebt gewild, jij wilde)
          > ons het gevra= we asked, have asked (we hebben gevraagd, we vroegen)
          >
          > etc.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "nordslesviger" <nordslesviger@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi all - long time no see :-)
          > >
          > > It seems to me that a creole like grammar would be the most natural solution. Conjugation with the help of participles is common whenever people meet and develop a new language. Good examples are Afrikaans and Negerhollands.
          > >
          > > Bjorn
          > >
          > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Yeah, we could use both... Maybe David's masterpiece can be used as a starting point, it has to be rewritten and respelled into FS anyway, and the FS pronunciation is different as well than the Frenkish one.
          > > >
          > > > But there are a few things in Frenkish I don't find too fit for Folksprak, especially the FK word order, in that case we can use the Middelsprake example.
          > > >
          > > > And an important point of discussion remains the verb: regular or irregular past and perfect etc.? In FK they are often irregular, in MS almost always regular (as in Interlingua).
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "swartsaxon" <anjarrette@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Maybe we should talk about getting this grammar written. I feel that the bulk of the work might end up on David's shoulders, since he has already written his masterful Frenkisch grammar, and since he has provided most of the vocabulary, and carries a lot of weight in the Folksprak group. David's Frenkisch grammar could be used as a starting point.
          > > > >
          > > > > But then Ingmar has already written his equally masterful Middelsprake grammar and vocabulary, and perhaps this could be used as a starting point for a Folksprak grammar.
          > > > >
          > > > > Or should we just start discussing it, and come to agreements?
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Andrew
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > I'm too lazy as well - or don't I like your grammars too? ;-)
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Anyway a remark about your regular verb suggestion below:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > didn't we have separate singular and plural, such as
          > > > > >
          > > > > > HETE
          > > > > >
          > > > > > present:
          > > > > > -singular:
          > > > > > ek HET
          > > > > > du HET
          > > > > > hi/si/ett HET
          > > > > > -plural:
          > > > > > wi HETE
          > > > > > ji HETE
          > > > > > dee HETE
          > > > > >
          > > > > > past:
          > > > > > sing.: ek, du, hi HETED
          > > > > > plur.: wi, ji, dee HETEDE
          > > > > >
          > > > > > We have this sing.vs plural already in the very few irregular verbs:
          > > > > > HI ISS vs WI AERE, and
          > > > > > HI HA vs WI HAVE
          > > > > > HI WAS vs WI WAERE
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Btw: I still don't like ISS for the first and second person singular, so no EK *ISS or DU *ISS, my suggestion is:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > ek aer, du aer, hi iss, se iss, ett iss
          > > > > > wi aere, ji aere, dee aere
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Yes we need a grammar written (by someone other than me! I'm too lazy at
          > > > > > > the moment and no one seems to like my grammars)
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Here's a suggestion for a normal regular verb such as hete.
          > > > > > > Infinitive: hete (to be called)
          > > > > > > Present: hete; ek hete, du hete, wi hete, ett hete
          > > > > > > Simple Past: hetede; ek hetede; si hetede etc.
          > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have heted; ek ha heted; wi have heted
          > > > > > > Present participle: hetend
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Wese is one of the few irregulars: Here's a suggestion;
          > > > > > > Infinitive: wese
          > > > > > > Present singular: iss; ek iss, du iss, hi iss
          > > > > > > Present plural: aere; we aere, ji aere, dee aere
          > > > > > > Simple Past Singular: was; ek was, du was, hi was
          > > > > > > Simple Past Plural: waere; wi waere; ji waere; dee waere
          > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have wesed; ek ha wesed, ji have wesed
          > > > > > > Present participle: wesend.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > On 20/02/2011 16:29, dibbs629 wrote:
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > How does one conjugate verbs?
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > How are the verb "wese" and "hete" conjugated, for example?
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > > > > > > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          > > > > > > > Version: 8.5.449 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3454 - Release Date: 02/19/11 19:33:00
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • chamavian
          Jo, et geet mi ok weder good, dat wil seggen: beter. Et is nu ses weken dat mien Vader störven is, ik begin mien olde leven weder een betken torügge to
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 11, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Jo, et geet mi ok weder good, dat wil seggen: beter. Et is nu ses weken dat mien Vader störven is, ik begin mien olde leven weder een betken torügge to kriegen...
            Welke medicien hest du dan?

            > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "nordslesviger" <nordslesviger@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Moin moin Ingmar.
            > > Dank einiger tägliche Dosis der Medizin geht es gut. Ich hoffe, du bist auch in Ordnung.
            > >
            > > Während meiner Abwesenheit habe ich som Genealogie Studien durchgeführt. Es zeigt, dass neben Nordschleswiger bin ich auch Ostfriesischen.
            > >
            > > Well, David are right a simple past is common to most Germanic languages so it is a natural solution to have the same in FS.
            > >
            > > But I find it quite interesting that several Germanic languages have lost the simple past and form past tense with forms of "to have". Thist is not only in Africans, but also in Negerhollands (or Hoch Kreol to awoid the N-word) and Yiddish, so I think we see a trend here.
            > >
            > > Tschüs
            > >
            > > Björn
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hei Bjorn Slesvisky! Datt iss god to have di torygg hir. Aer du OK?
            > > >
            > > > An Afrikaans-like grammar has been suggested several times before here and may be a good idea.
            > > >
            > > > Actually many Folksprak grammar proposals have already several things in common with it:
            > > >
            > > > FS articles have one form (as in English, as well), this does not depend on gender as in German (3 basic forms + many cases), Dutch and Scandinavian (2, for common and neuter gender).
            > > >
            > > > Adjectives always have the same form.
            > > >
            > > > Plural is formed regularly (in Afrikaans most often as well, however this is not always obvious for non-Dutch speakers)
            > > >
            > > > FS verbs are usually regular, depends on the variety: some people want irregular pasts, others (including myself) only regular ones.
            > > > Btw Afrikaans only has one past verb form left, a construction with to have "hê ge-...",
            > > >
            > > > ek het gesien= I saw, I have seen (Dutch: ik heb gezien, ik zag)
            > > > jy het gewil = you wanted, have wanted (jij hebt gewild, jij wilde)
            > > > ons het gevra= we asked, have asked (we hebben gevraagd, we vroegen)
            > > >
            > > > etc.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "nordslesviger" <nordslesviger@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Hi all - long time no see :-)
            > > > >
            > > > > It seems to me that a creole like grammar would be the most natural solution. Conjugation with the help of participles is common whenever people meet and develop a new language. Good examples are Afrikaans and Negerhollands.
            > > > >
            > > > > Bjorn
            > > > >
            > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Yeah, we could use both... Maybe David's masterpiece can be used as a starting point, it has to be rewritten and respelled into FS anyway, and the FS pronunciation is different as well than the Frenkish one.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > But there are a few things in Frenkish I don't find too fit for Folksprak, especially the FK word order, in that case we can use the Middelsprake example.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > And an important point of discussion remains the verb: regular or irregular past and perfect etc.? In FK they are often irregular, in MS almost always regular (as in Interlingua).
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "swartsaxon" <anjarrette@> wrote:
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Maybe we should talk about getting this grammar written. I feel that the bulk of the work might end up on David's shoulders, since he has already written his masterful Frenkisch grammar, and since he has provided most of the vocabulary, and carries a lot of weight in the Folksprak group. David's Frenkisch grammar could be used as a starting point.
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > But then Ingmar has already written his equally masterful Middelsprake grammar and vocabulary, and perhaps this could be used as a starting point for a Folksprak grammar.
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Or should we just start discussing it, and come to agreements?
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Andrew
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > I'm too lazy as well - or don't I like your grammars too? ;-)
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Anyway a remark about your regular verb suggestion below:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > didn't we have separate singular and plural, such as
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > HETE
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > present:
            > > > > > > > -singular:
            > > > > > > > ek HET
            > > > > > > > du HET
            > > > > > > > hi/si/ett HET
            > > > > > > > -plural:
            > > > > > > > wi HETE
            > > > > > > > ji HETE
            > > > > > > > dee HETE
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > past:
            > > > > > > > sing.: ek, du, hi HETED
            > > > > > > > plur.: wi, ji, dee HETEDE
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > We have this sing.vs plural already in the very few irregular verbs:
            > > > > > > > HI ISS vs WI AERE, and
            > > > > > > > HI HA vs WI HAVE
            > > > > > > > HI WAS vs WI WAERE
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Btw: I still don't like ISS for the first and second person singular, so no EK *ISS or DU *ISS, my suggestion is:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > ek aer, du aer, hi iss, se iss, ett iss
            > > > > > > > wi aere, ji aere, dee aere
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > Yes we need a grammar written (by someone other than me! I'm too lazy at
            > > > > > > > > the moment and no one seems to like my grammars)
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > Here's a suggestion for a normal regular verb such as hete.
            > > > > > > > > Infinitive: hete (to be called)
            > > > > > > > > Present: hete; ek hete, du hete, wi hete, ett hete
            > > > > > > > > Simple Past: hetede; ek hetede; si hetede etc.
            > > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have heted; ek ha heted; wi have heted
            > > > > > > > > Present participle: hetend
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > Wese is one of the few irregulars: Here's a suggestion;
            > > > > > > > > Infinitive: wese
            > > > > > > > > Present singular: iss; ek iss, du iss, hi iss
            > > > > > > > > Present plural: aere; we aere, ji aere, dee aere
            > > > > > > > > Simple Past Singular: was; ek was, du was, hi was
            > > > > > > > > Simple Past Plural: waere; wi waere; ji waere; dee waere
            > > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have wesed; ek ha wesed, ji have wesed
            > > > > > > > > Present participle: wesend.
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > On 20/02/2011 16:29, dibbs629 wrote:
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > How does one conjugate verbs?
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > How are the verb "wese" and "hete" conjugated, for example?
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > No virus found in this incoming message.
            > > > > > > > > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            > > > > > > > > > Version: 8.5.449 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3454 - Release Date: 02/19/11 19:33:00
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • swartsaxon
            Ek aere overrashed, datt ek all dis Nedersaksish ferstan kann! AJ
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 11, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Ek aere overrashed, datt ek all dis Nedersaksish ferstan kann!

              AJ

              --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
              >
              > Jo, et geet mi ok weder good, dat wil seggen: beter. Et is nu ses weken dat mien Vader störven is, ik begin mien olde leven weder een betken torügge to kriegen...
              > Welke medicien hest du dan?
              >
              > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "nordslesviger" <nordslesviger@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Moin moin Ingmar.
              > > > Dank einiger tägliche Dosis der Medizin geht es gut. Ich hoffe, du bist auch in Ordnung.
              > > >
              > > > Während meiner Abwesenheit habe ich som Genealogie Studien durchgeführt. Es zeigt, dass neben Nordschleswiger bin ich auch Ostfriesischen.
              > > >
              > > > Well, David are right a simple past is common to most Germanic languages so it is a natural solution to have the same in FS.
              > > >
              > > > But I find it quite interesting that several Germanic languages have lost the simple past and form past tense with forms of "to have". Thist is not only in Africans, but also in Negerhollands (or Hoch Kreol to awoid the N-word) and Yiddish, so I think we see a trend here.
              > > >
              > > > Tschüs
              > > >
              > > > Björn
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Hei Bjorn Slesvisky! Datt iss god to have di torygg hir. Aer du OK?
              > > > >
              > > > > An Afrikaans-like grammar has been suggested several times before here and may be a good idea.
              > > > >
              > > > > Actually many Folksprak grammar proposals have already several things in common with it:
              > > > >
              > > > > FS articles have one form (as in English, as well), this does not depend on gender as in German (3 basic forms + many cases), Dutch and Scandinavian (2, for common and neuter gender).
              > > > >
              > > > > Adjectives always have the same form.
              > > > >
              > > > > Plural is formed regularly (in Afrikaans most often as well, however this is not always obvious for non-Dutch speakers)
              > > > >
              > > > > FS verbs are usually regular, depends on the variety: some people want irregular pasts, others (including myself) only regular ones.
              > > > > Btw Afrikaans only has one past verb form left, a construction with to have "hê ge-...",
              > > > >
              > > > > ek het gesien= I saw, I have seen (Dutch: ik heb gezien, ik zag)
              > > > > jy het gewil = you wanted, have wanted (jij hebt gewild, jij wilde)
              > > > > ons het gevra= we asked, have asked (we hebben gevraagd, we vroegen)
              > > > >
              > > > > etc.
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "nordslesviger" <nordslesviger@> wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Hi all - long time no see :-)
              > > > > >
              > > > > > It seems to me that a creole like grammar would be the most natural solution. Conjugation with the help of participles is common whenever people meet and develop a new language. Good examples are Afrikaans and Negerhollands.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Bjorn
              > > > > >
              > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > Yeah, we could use both... Maybe David's masterpiece can be used as a starting point, it has to be rewritten and respelled into FS anyway, and the FS pronunciation is different as well than the Frenkish one.
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > But there are a few things in Frenkish I don't find too fit for Folksprak, especially the FK word order, in that case we can use the Middelsprake example.
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > And an important point of discussion remains the verb: regular or irregular past and perfect etc.? In FK they are often irregular, in MS almost always regular (as in Interlingua).
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "swartsaxon" <anjarrette@> wrote:
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > Maybe we should talk about getting this grammar written. I feel that the bulk of the work might end up on David's shoulders, since he has already written his masterful Frenkisch grammar, and since he has provided most of the vocabulary, and carries a lot of weight in the Folksprak group. David's Frenkisch grammar could be used as a starting point.
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > But then Ingmar has already written his equally masterful Middelsprake grammar and vocabulary, and perhaps this could be used as a starting point for a Folksprak grammar.
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > Or should we just start discussing it, and come to agreements?
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > Andrew
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > I'm too lazy as well - or don't I like your grammars too? ;-)
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > Anyway a remark about your regular verb suggestion below:
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > didn't we have separate singular and plural, such as
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > HETE
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > present:
              > > > > > > > > -singular:
              > > > > > > > > ek HET
              > > > > > > > > du HET
              > > > > > > > > hi/si/ett HET
              > > > > > > > > -plural:
              > > > > > > > > wi HETE
              > > > > > > > > ji HETE
              > > > > > > > > dee HETE
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > past:
              > > > > > > > > sing.: ek, du, hi HETED
              > > > > > > > > plur.: wi, ji, dee HETEDE
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > We have this sing.vs plural already in the very few irregular verbs:
              > > > > > > > > HI ISS vs WI AERE, and
              > > > > > > > > HI HA vs WI HAVE
              > > > > > > > > HI WAS vs WI WAERE
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > Btw: I still don't like ISS for the first and second person singular, so no EK *ISS or DU *ISS, my suggestion is:
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > ek aer, du aer, hi iss, se iss, ett iss
              > > > > > > > > wi aere, ji aere, dee aere
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > Yes we need a grammar written (by someone other than me! I'm too lazy at
              > > > > > > > > > the moment and no one seems to like my grammars)
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > Here's a suggestion for a normal regular verb such as hete.
              > > > > > > > > > Infinitive: hete (to be called)
              > > > > > > > > > Present: hete; ek hete, du hete, wi hete, ett hete
              > > > > > > > > > Simple Past: hetede; ek hetede; si hetede etc.
              > > > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have heted; ek ha heted; wi have heted
              > > > > > > > > > Present participle: hetend
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > Wese is one of the few irregulars: Here's a suggestion;
              > > > > > > > > > Infinitive: wese
              > > > > > > > > > Present singular: iss; ek iss, du iss, hi iss
              > > > > > > > > > Present plural: aere; we aere, ji aere, dee aere
              > > > > > > > > > Simple Past Singular: was; ek was, du was, hi was
              > > > > > > > > > Simple Past Plural: waere; wi waere; ji waere; dee waere
              > > > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have wesed; ek ha wesed, ji have wesed
              > > > > > > > > > Present participle: wesend.
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > On 20/02/2011 16:29, dibbs629 wrote:
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > How does one conjugate verbs?
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > How are the verb "wese" and "hete" conjugated, for example?
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > No virus found in this incoming message.
              > > > > > > > > > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              > > > > > > > > > > Version: 8.5.449 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3454 - Release Date: 02/19/11 19:33:00
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • chamavian
              Ek aer niht overrashed, fordatt Nedersaksish iss de mest central Germanish sprak, mer dann all de ander Germanish spraken ...
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 11, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Ek aer niht overrashed, fordatt Nedersaksish iss de mest central Germanish sprak, mer dann all de ander Germanish spraken ...

                --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "swartsaxon" <anjarrette@...> wrote:
                >
                > Ek aere overrashed, datt ek all dis Nedersaksish ferstan kann!
                >
                > AJ
                >
                > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Jo, et geet mi ok weder good, dat wil seggen: beter. Et is nu ses weken dat mien Vader störven is, ik begin mien olde leven weder een betken torügge to kriegen...
                > > Welke medicien hest du dan?
                > >
                > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "nordslesviger" <nordslesviger@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Moin moin Ingmar.
                > > > > Dank einiger tägliche Dosis der Medizin geht es gut. Ich hoffe, du bist auch in Ordnung.
                > > > >
                > > > > Während meiner Abwesenheit habe ich som Genealogie Studien durchgeführt. Es zeigt, dass neben Nordschleswiger bin ich auch Ostfriesischen.
                > > > >
                > > > > Well, David are right a simple past is common to most Germanic languages so it is a natural solution to have the same in FS.
                > > > >
                > > > > But I find it quite interesting that several Germanic languages have lost the simple past and form past tense with forms of "to have". Thist is not only in Africans, but also in Negerhollands (or Hoch Kreol to awoid the N-word) and Yiddish, so I think we see a trend here.
                > > > >
                > > > > Tschüs
                > > > >
                > > > > Björn
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Hei Bjorn Slesvisky! Datt iss god to have di torygg hir. Aer du OK?
                > > > > >
                > > > > > An Afrikaans-like grammar has been suggested several times before here and may be a good idea.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Actually many Folksprak grammar proposals have already several things in common with it:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > FS articles have one form (as in English, as well), this does not depend on gender as in German (3 basic forms + many cases), Dutch and Scandinavian (2, for common and neuter gender).
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Adjectives always have the same form.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Plural is formed regularly (in Afrikaans most often as well, however this is not always obvious for non-Dutch speakers)
                > > > > >
                > > > > > FS verbs are usually regular, depends on the variety: some people want irregular pasts, others (including myself) only regular ones.
                > > > > > Btw Afrikaans only has one past verb form left, a construction with to have "hê ge-...",
                > > > > >
                > > > > > ek het gesien= I saw, I have seen (Dutch: ik heb gezien, ik zag)
                > > > > > jy het gewil = you wanted, have wanted (jij hebt gewild, jij wilde)
                > > > > > ons het gevra= we asked, have asked (we hebben gevraagd, we vroegen)
                > > > > >
                > > > > > etc.
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "nordslesviger" <nordslesviger@> wrote:
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Hi all - long time no see :-)
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > It seems to me that a creole like grammar would be the most natural solution. Conjugation with the help of participles is common whenever people meet and develop a new language. Good examples are Afrikaans and Negerhollands.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Bjorn
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > Yeah, we could use both... Maybe David's masterpiece can be used as a starting point, it has to be rewritten and respelled into FS anyway, and the FS pronunciation is different as well than the Frenkish one.
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > But there are a few things in Frenkish I don't find too fit for Folksprak, especially the FK word order, in that case we can use the Middelsprake example.
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > And an important point of discussion remains the verb: regular or irregular past and perfect etc.? In FK they are often irregular, in MS almost always regular (as in Interlingua).
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "swartsaxon" <anjarrette@> wrote:
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > Maybe we should talk about getting this grammar written. I feel that the bulk of the work might end up on David's shoulders, since he has already written his masterful Frenkisch grammar, and since he has provided most of the vocabulary, and carries a lot of weight in the Folksprak group. David's Frenkisch grammar could be used as a starting point.
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > But then Ingmar has already written his equally masterful Middelsprake grammar and vocabulary, and perhaps this could be used as a starting point for a Folksprak grammar.
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > Or should we just start discussing it, and come to agreements?
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > Andrew
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > I'm too lazy as well - or don't I like your grammars too? ;-)
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > Anyway a remark about your regular verb suggestion below:
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > didn't we have separate singular and plural, such as
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > HETE
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > present:
                > > > > > > > > > -singular:
                > > > > > > > > > ek HET
                > > > > > > > > > du HET
                > > > > > > > > > hi/si/ett HET
                > > > > > > > > > -plural:
                > > > > > > > > > wi HETE
                > > > > > > > > > ji HETE
                > > > > > > > > > dee HETE
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > past:
                > > > > > > > > > sing.: ek, du, hi HETED
                > > > > > > > > > plur.: wi, ji, dee HETEDE
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > We have this sing.vs plural already in the very few irregular verbs:
                > > > > > > > > > HI ISS vs WI AERE, and
                > > > > > > > > > HI HA vs WI HAVE
                > > > > > > > > > HI WAS vs WI WAERE
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > Btw: I still don't like ISS for the first and second person singular, so no EK *ISS or DU *ISS, my suggestion is:
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > ek aer, du aer, hi iss, se iss, ett iss
                > > > > > > > > > wi aere, ji aere, dee aere
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > Yes we need a grammar written (by someone other than me! I'm too lazy at
                > > > > > > > > > > the moment and no one seems to like my grammars)
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > Here's a suggestion for a normal regular verb such as hete.
                > > > > > > > > > > Infinitive: hete (to be called)
                > > > > > > > > > > Present: hete; ek hete, du hete, wi hete, ett hete
                > > > > > > > > > > Simple Past: hetede; ek hetede; si hetede etc.
                > > > > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have heted; ek ha heted; wi have heted
                > > > > > > > > > > Present participle: hetend
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > Wese is one of the few irregulars: Here's a suggestion;
                > > > > > > > > > > Infinitive: wese
                > > > > > > > > > > Present singular: iss; ek iss, du iss, hi iss
                > > > > > > > > > > Present plural: aere; we aere, ji aere, dee aere
                > > > > > > > > > > Simple Past Singular: was; ek was, du was, hi was
                > > > > > > > > > > Simple Past Plural: waere; wi waere; ji waere; dee waere
                > > > > > > > > > > Perfect Tense: have wesed; ek ha wesed, ji have wesed
                > > > > > > > > > > Present participle: wesend.
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > On 20/02/2011 16:29, dibbs629 wrote:
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > > How does one conjugate verbs?
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > > How are the verb "wese" and "hete" conjugated, for example?
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > > No virus found in this incoming message.
                > > > > > > > > > > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                > > > > > > > > > > > Version: 8.5.449 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3454 - Release Date: 02/19/11 19:33:00
                > > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
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                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • adam.skoog
                Separe plurals is how I remember it, yes, and what I would prefer. -Ø for singular and -e for plural, as you have written here. I m all for some
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 17, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Separe plurals is how I remember it, yes, and what I would prefer. -Ø for singular and -e for plural, as you have written here.

                  I'm all for some irregularities. This is, after all, an Intergermanic language, and not an international language.

                  This is the conjugation I had for my version of HETE:

                  INFINITIVE: heiten

                  PRES. SING.: heit
                  PRES. PLUR.: heite

                  PRET. SING.: het
                  PRET. PLUR.: hete

                  PRES. PART. SING.: heitend
                  PRES. PART. PLUR.: heitende

                  In case this can be inspirational...

                  --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I'm too lazy as well - or don't I like your grammars too? ;-)
                  >
                  > Anyway a remark about your regular verb suggestion below:
                  >
                  > didn't we have separate singular and plural, such as
                  >
                  > HETE
                  >
                  > present:
                  > -singular:
                  > ek HET
                  > du HET
                  > hi/si/ett HET
                  > -plural:
                  > wi HETE
                  > ji HETE
                  > dee HETE
                  >
                  > past:
                  > sing.: ek, du, hi HETED
                  > plur.: wi, ji, dee HETEDE
                  >
                  > We have this sing.vs plural already in the very few irregular verbs:
                  > HI ISS vs WI AERE, and
                  > HI HA vs WI HAVE
                  > HI WAS vs WI WAERE
                  >
                  > Btw: I still don't like ISS for the first and second person singular, so no EK *ISS or DU *ISS, my suggestion is:
                  >
                  > ek aer, du aer, hi iss, se iss, ett iss
                  > wi aere, ji aere, dee aere
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Yes we need a grammar written (by someone other than me! I'm too lazy at
                  > > the moment and no one seems to like my grammars)
                  > >
                  > > Here's a suggestion for a normal regular verb such as hete.
                  > > Infinitive: hete (to be called)
                  > > Present: hete; ek hete, du hete, wi hete, ett hete
                  > > Simple Past: hetede; ek hetede; si hetede etc.
                  > > Perfect Tense: have heted; ek ha heted; wi have heted
                  > > Present participle: hetend
                  > >
                  > > Wese is one of the few irregulars: Here's a suggestion;
                  > > Infinitive: wese
                  > > Present singular: iss; ek iss, du iss, hi iss
                  > > Present plural: aere; we aere, ji aere, dee aere
                  > > Simple Past Singular: was; ek was, du was, hi was
                  > > Simple Past Plural: waere; wi waere; ji waere; dee waere
                  > > Perfect Tense: have wesed; ek ha wesed, ji have wesed
                  > > Present participle: wesend.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > On 20/02/2011 16:29, dibbs629 wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > How does one conjugate verbs?
                  > > >
                  > > > How are the verb "wese" and "hete" conjugated, for example?
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > No virus found in this incoming message.
                  > > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  > > > Version: 8.5.449 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3454 - Release Date: 02/19/11 19:33:00
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
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