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The Goths

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  • Abrigon Gusiq
    Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks was the
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 15, 2011
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      Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
      Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
      was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
      Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
      long gone.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
      http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
      http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.

      Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
    • r.sookias
      Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 15, 2011
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        Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P


        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@...> wrote:
        >
        > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
        > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
        > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
        > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
        > long gone.
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
        > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
        > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
        >
        > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
        >
      • chamavian
        Gotland?
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 15, 2011
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          Gotland?

          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@...> wrote:
          >
          > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
          >
          >
          > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
          > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
          > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
          > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
          > > long gone.
          > >
          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
          > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
          > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
          > >
          > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
          > >
          >
        • chamavian
          Btw: I see you spell fraon , is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å? And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 20, 2011
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            Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
            And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?

            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@...> wrote:
            >
            > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
            >
            >
            > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
            > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
            > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
            > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
            > > long gone.
            > >
            > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
            > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
            > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
            > >
            > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
            > >
            >
          • adam.skoog
            No. It s for and for .
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 20, 2011
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              No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.

              --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
              >
              > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
              > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
              >
              > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
              > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
              > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
              > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
              > > > long gone.
              > > >
              > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
              > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
              > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
              > > >
              > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • chamavian
              Oh but is fraon a misspelling then in Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P ?
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 20, 2011
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                Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?


                --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@...> wrote:
                >
                > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
                >
                > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
                > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
                > >
                > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
                > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
                > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
                > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
                > > > > long gone.
                > > > >
                > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
                > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
                > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
                > > > >
                > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • adam.skoog
                Probably. Hopefully.
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 20, 2011
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                  Probably. Hopefully.

                  --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
                  > >
                  > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
                  > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
                  > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
                  > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
                  > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
                  > > > > > long gone.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
                  > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
                  > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • chamavian
                  Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA. Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 24, 2011
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                    Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA.
                    Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when Æ becomes AE, why wouldn't Å become AO?

                    --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Probably. Hopefully.
                    >
                    > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
                    > > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
                    > > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
                    > > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
                    > > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
                    > > > > > > long gone.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
                    > > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
                    > > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • adam.skoog
                    seems logical to me, as is derived from a long . and (and , in German) have their own history.
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 24, 2011
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                      <aa> seems logical to me, as <å> is derived from a long <a>. <oe> and <ae> (and <ue>, in German) have their own history.

                      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA.
                      > Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when Æ becomes AE, why wouldn't Å become AO?
                      >
                      > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Probably. Hopefully.
                      > >
                      > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
                      > > > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
                      > > > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
                      > > > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
                      > > > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
                      > > > > > > > long gone.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
                      > > > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
                      > > > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • chamavian
                      Yeah, maybe over 1000 years ago it was long , but it became a kind of long sound, even in Icelandic it s . The spelling remained for a while
                      Message 10 of 12 , Mar 27, 2011
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                        Yeah, maybe over 1000 years ago it was long <a>, but it became a kind of long <o> sound, even in Icelandic it's <au>. The spelling remained <aa> for a while until it became <å>, and so that's tradition now and probably will stay like that for ever, no problem of course but that doesn't mean it's logical, but historical it is.

                        In the Low Saxon language of the Netherlands, the spelling <ao> is used for the same darkened sound [O:], derived from old long <a>, whereas <a>/<aa> is used for a real long [a:] sound, mostly derived from old short <a>, which was lengthened later.
                        So we have [O:] in words like "gaon", "slaopen", "laot" with old long <a>, but [a:] in "water", "maak", "later" with old short <a>.

                        In most of Low Saxon in Germany, both sounds became identical as dark [O:], but are spelled with <a>/<aa>:
                        "gaan", "slapen", "laat", "water", "maak", "later" etc.

                        NB: <aa> is used in closed syllables, <a> in open ones, for [a:]


                        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > <aa> seems logical to me, as <å> is derived from a long <a>. <oe> and <ae> (and <ue>, in German) have their own history.
                        >
                        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA.
                        > > Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when Æ becomes AE, why wouldn't Å become AO?
                        > >
                        > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Probably. Hopefully.
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
                        > > > > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
                        > > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
                        > > > > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
                        > > > > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
                        > > > > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
                        > > > > > > > > long gone.
                        > > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
                        > > > > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
                        > > > > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
                        > > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
                        > > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • adam.skoog
                        You are mixing up your brackets here. Icelandic is not , but it is indeed /aU/. Swedish is not , but it is indeed /o/. Anyhow, what I meant to
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 13, 2011
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                          You are mixing up your brackets here. Icelandic <á> is not <au>, but it is indeed /aU/. Swedish <å> is not <o>, but it is indeed /o/.

                          Anyhow, what I meant to say was simply that <å> has a different history than <æ ä> and <ø œ ö>.

                          --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Yeah, maybe over 1000 years ago it was long <a>, but it became a kind of long <o> sound, even in Icelandic it's <au>. The spelling remained <aa> for a while until it became <å>, and so that's tradition now and probably will stay like that for ever, no problem of course but that doesn't mean it's logical, but historical it is.
                          >
                          > In the Low Saxon language of the Netherlands, the spelling <ao> is used for the same darkened sound [O:], derived from old long <a>, whereas <a>/<aa> is used for a real long [a:] sound, mostly derived from old short <a>, which was lengthened later.
                          > So we have [O:] in words like "gaon", "slaopen", "laot" with old long <a>, but [a:] in "water", "maak", "later" with old short <a>.
                          >
                          > In most of Low Saxon in Germany, both sounds became identical as dark [O:], but are spelled with <a>/<aa>:
                          > "gaan", "slapen", "laat", "water", "maak", "later" etc.
                          >
                          > NB: <aa> is used in closed syllables, <a> in open ones, for [a:]
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > <aa> seems logical to me, as <å> is derived from a long <a>. <oe> and <ae> (and <ue>, in German) have their own history.
                          > >
                          > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA.
                          > > > Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when Æ becomes AE, why wouldn't Å become AO?
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Probably. Hopefully.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
                          > > > > > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
                          > > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
                          > > > > > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
                          > > > > > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
                          > > > > > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
                          > > > > > > > > > long gone.
                          > > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
                          > > > > > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
                          > > > > > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
                          > > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
                          > > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • chamavian
                          oh ok, mixed up me brackets, sorry mate, that was like dumb of me.
                          Message 12 of 12 , Apr 15, 2011
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                            oh ok, mixed up me brackets, sorry mate, that was like dumb of me.




                            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > You are mixing up your brackets here. Icelandic <á> is not <au>, but it is indeed /aU/. Swedish <å> is not <o>, but it is indeed /o/.
                            >
                            > Anyhow, what I meant to say was simply that <å> has a different history than <æ ä> and <ø œ ö>.
                            >
                            > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Yeah, maybe over 1000 years ago it was long <a>, but it became a kind of long <o> sound, even in Icelandic it's <au>. The spelling remained <aa> for a while until it became <å>, and so that's tradition now and probably will stay like that for ever, no problem of course but that doesn't mean it's logical, but historical it is.
                            > >
                            > > In the Low Saxon language of the Netherlands, the spelling <ao> is used for the same darkened sound [O:], derived from old long <a>, whereas <a>/<aa> is used for a real long [a:] sound, mostly derived from old short <a>, which was lengthened later.
                            > > So we have [O:] in words like "gaon", "slaopen", "laot" with old long <a>, but [a:] in "water", "maak", "later" with old short <a>.
                            > >
                            > > In most of Low Saxon in Germany, both sounds became identical as dark [O:], but are spelled with <a>/<aa>:
                            > > "gaan", "slapen", "laat", "water", "maak", "later" etc.
                            > >
                            > > NB: <aa> is used in closed syllables, <a> in open ones, for [a:]
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > <aa> seems logical to me, as <å> is derived from a long <a>. <oe> and <ae> (and <ue>, in German) have their own history.
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Well, but AO for Å would make sense, even more than AA.
                            > > > > Of course I know AA is the historical Danish spelling, used until quite recently in Danish, but when Æ becomes AE, why wouldn't Å become AO?
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Probably. Hopefully.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Oh but is "fraon" a misspelling then in "Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P" ?
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "adam.skoog" <adam.skoog@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > No. It's <AA> for <Å> and <aa> for <å>.
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > Btw: I see you spell "fraon", is AO the non-diacritic way to spell å?
                            > > > > > > > > And do you use AE for ä, and OE for ö, as well?
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "r.sookias" <r.sookias@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > > Ingen skit. De kom fraon sverige :P
                            > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Abrigon Gusiq" <abrigon@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > > > Just a thing for fun. Goths, more like Visi and Ostrogoths, were part of a
                            > > > > > > > > > > Germanic migration, first Germanic people to be known by the Romans/Greeks
                            > > > > > > > > > > was the Goths and related people, such as Vandals, Lombards and Burgundians.
                            > > > > > > > > > > Now extinct, where at one time they was many, from Crimea to Spain, but now
                            > > > > > > > > > > long gone.
                            > > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_language
                            > > > > > > > > > > http://www.freelang.net/dictionary/gothic.php
                            > > > > > > > > > > http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/letters.htm A nice dictionary.
                            > > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > > > Hwairban Alaric/Mike Adams
                            > > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
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