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  • swarvin
    I`m an Esperantist, and my interest in conlangs landed me here. This is all very fun. I`ve looked over some of the postings. I have much to say, but will hold
    Message 1 of 5 , May 5, 2008
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      I`m an Esperantist, and my interest in conlangs landed me here.

      This is all very fun. I`ve looked over some of the postings. I have
      much to say, but will hold most back for now. I`m a native speaker of
      a particularly odd dialect of English here in the North Atlantic. The
      dialog about vowel sounds made me giggle a bit. Here I have diphthongs
      where others are pure and short where you utter two.

      I have a plural form of the second person, some gender (or rather,
      some animate/inanimate) tendencies with nouns. Even a variant system
      for conjugating verbs. Other North Americans have a hell of a time
      understanding us. They think we sound like pirates! Or just plain wrong.

      With all the little internal differences within any one given
      language, consensus must be nigh on impossible when multiple sister
      and mother tongues are compared.

      ... just a thought.

      So tell me please somebody, where are we now? Is a language being
      formed? Where do I find the core of what has been completed? I`d love
      to be part of this.

      Victor.
    • David Parke
      Where are you located Victor? Your dialect sounds interesting. I remember seeing in the excellent BBC documentary The Story of English , an island off the
      Message 2 of 5 , May 5, 2008
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        Where are you located Victor? Your dialect sounds interesting.
        I remember seeing in the excellent BBC documentary "The Story of
        English", an island off the coast of the US when the locals spoke what
        was described as being a very Elizabethan English. To my ears, they
        sounded more like Australians than Americans.
        The group is having a bit of a hiatus at the moment, maybe we're all
        out of ideas, of just tired of the bickering involved in trying to
        find a consensus.
        I am not sure if any other members are doing anthing active on this
        project at the moment but I am still working on researching
        (potential) vocabulary. I've been trying to create FS translations,
        not just into English but into some other major languages as well
        (German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Russian) which is slowing my rate of
        word finding a lot . I might post some examples if I find the time and
        anybody shows some interest.

        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "swarvin" <swarvin@...> wrote:
        >
        > I`m an Esperantist, and my interest in conlangs landed me here.
        >
        > This is all very fun. I`ve looked over some of the postings. I have
        > much to say, but will hold most back for now. I`m a native speaker of
        > a particularly odd dialect of English here in the North Atlantic. The
        > dialog about vowel sounds made me giggle a bit. Here I have diphthongs
        > where others are pure and short where you utter two.
        >
        > I have a plural form of the second person, some gender (or rather,
        > some animate/inanimate) tendencies with nouns. Even a variant system
        > for conjugating verbs. Other North Americans have a hell of a time
        > understanding us. They think we sound like pirates! Or just plain wrong.
        >
        > With all the little internal differences within any one given
        > language, consensus must be nigh on impossible when multiple sister
        > and mother tongues are compared.
        >
        > ... just a thought.
        >
        > So tell me please somebody, where are we now? Is a language being
        > formed? Where do I find the core of what has been completed? I`d love
        > to be part of this.
        >
        > Victor.
        >
      • Andrew Jarrette
        David Parke wrote: Where are you located Victor? Your dialect sounds interesting. I remember seeing in the
        Message 3 of 5 , May 6, 2008
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          David Parke <parked@...> wrote: Where are you located Victor? Your dialect sounds interesting.
          I remember seeing in the excellent BBC documentary "The Story of
          English", an island off the coast of the US when the locals spoke what
          was described as being a very Elizabethan English. To my ears, they
          sounded more like Australians than Americans.
          The group is having a bit of a hiatus at the moment, maybe we're all
          out of ideas, of just tired of the bickering involved in trying to
          find a consensus.
          I am not sure if any other members are doing anthing active on this
          project at the moment but I am still working on researching
          (potential) vocabulary. I've been trying to create FS translations,
          not just into English but into some other major languages as well
          (German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Russian) which is slowing my rate of
          word finding a lot . I might post some examples if I find the time and
          anybody shows some interest.




















          -------------------------------------

          I would love to see your examples of FS translations, especially the English ones (of course) but I also have an interest in the German ones due to my relative familiarity with German. Of course, you might post examples of translations into all those languages.

          My guess is that Victor lives in Newfoundland. That's the only Canadian region that has anything resembling a "dialect"; otherwise English Canada is quite homogeneous, apart from some minor vowel variations and a few rural varieties (e.g. Ottawa Valley) that have features such as a separate 2nd plural pronoun ("youse"). But Newfoundlandish, as I'll call it, sounds quite different from mainland Canadian English and is often partly or mostly unintelligible to mainland Canadians. I don't know anything about its grammar.

          Andrew



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • swarvin
          Hi all.. nice to know there was someone out there! I as well would love to see some translations... and I like the word list idea too. Evert, bi-directional
          Message 4 of 5 , May 6, 2008
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            Hi all.. nice to know there was someone out there!

            I as well would love to see some translations... and I like the word
            list idea too. Evert, bi-directional would be very helpfull for us
            newbies. I`ve a limited knowledge of the other Northern tongues so the
            meanings of certain words are not always obvious to me. That said, is
            the goal to create an easy-to-learn 'esperanto' based on Germanic, or
            a 'bridge' to the Germanic languages?

            And yes. Newfoundland it is! We tend to call it Newfinese, or
            sometimes even Newfie... but that`s a little derogatory these days.
            Our dictionaries call it Newfoundland English. It could very well have
            been the subject of the BBC program. There are actually a great many
            variants of English spoken here. In some areas the older people still
            say "dee" or " 'ee" for "you". There are towns where people use
            "youse" as the second person plural, but "ye" is the standard.

            People phrase things very differently from our mainland neighbours as
            well, so Andrew is right - between the accents, the lexicon, grammar,
            and phrasing, most mainlanders are quite baffled when we speak to one
            another. Since we joined Canada however, there has been a great deal
            of pressure in the education system to beat all this out of us.
            Presently, most of us can pass for Canadians, and know two grammars.

            But, this group is for folkspraak and not a discussion of an English
            dialect. I`ll try to keep it to a dull roar, as they say, and only
            point out examples where they seems to fit.

            Victor.







            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Jarrette <anjarrette@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > David Parke <parked@...> wrote: Where
            are you located Victor? Your dialect sounds interesting.
            > I remember seeing in the excellent BBC documentary "The Story of
            > English", an island off the coast of the US when the locals spoke what
            > was described as being a very Elizabethan English. To my ears, they
            > sounded more like Australians than Americans.
            > The group is having a bit of a hiatus at the moment, maybe we're all
            > out of ideas, of just tired of the bickering involved in trying to
            > find a consensus.
            > I am not sure if any other members are doing anthing active on this
            > project at the moment but I am still working on researching
            > (potential) vocabulary. I've been trying to create FS translations,
            > not just into English but into some other major languages as well
            > (German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Russian) which is slowing my rate of
            > word finding a lot . I might post some examples if I find the time and
            > anybody shows some interest.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > -------------------------------------
            >
            > I would love to see your examples of FS translations, especially the
            English ones (of course) but I also have an interest in the German
            ones due to my relative familiarity with German. Of course, you might
            post examples of translations into all those languages.
            >
            > My guess is that Victor lives in Newfoundland. That's the only
            Canadian region that has anything resembling a "dialect"; otherwise
            English Canada is quite homogeneous, apart from some minor vowel
            variations and a few rural varieties (e.g. Ottawa Valley) that have
            features such as a separate 2nd plural pronoun ("youse"). But
            Newfoundlandish, as I'll call it, sounds quite different from mainland
            Canadian English and is often partly or mostly unintelligible to
            mainland Canadians. I don't know anything about its grammar.
            >
            > Andrew
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • David Parke
            I would NEVER conflate Americans with Canadians or Newfoundlanders. ;-). No it was definitely part of the USA in The Story of English . I vaguely remember it
            Message 5 of 5 , May 6, 2008
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              I would NEVER conflate Americans with Canadians or Newfoundlanders.
              ;-). No it was definitely part of the USA in "The Story of English". I
              vaguely remember it was in the Mid Atlantic states, perhaps around
              Chesapeake Bay. To the south of these islands are other off shore
              islands where the locals speaker Gullah, which is a creole English
              which has retained some features of the original African languages
              spoken by the black slaves.

              --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "swarvin" <swarvin@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Hi all.. nice to know there was someone out there!
              >
              > I as well would love to see some translations... and I like the word
              > list idea too. Evert, bi-directional would be very helpfull for us
              > newbies. I`ve a limited knowledge of the other Northern tongues so the
              > meanings of certain words are not always obvious to me. That said, is
              > the goal to create an easy-to-learn 'esperanto' based on Germanic, or
              > a 'bridge' to the Germanic languages?
              >
              > And yes. Newfoundland it is! We tend to call it Newfinese, or
              > sometimes even Newfie... but that`s a little derogatory these days.
              > Our dictionaries call it Newfoundland English. It could very well have
              > been the subject of the BBC program. There are actually a great many
              > variants of English spoken here. In some areas the older people still
              > say "dee" or " 'ee" for "you". There are towns where people use
              > "youse" as the second person plural, but "ye" is the standard.
              >
              > People phrase things very differently from our mainland neighbours as
              > well, so Andrew is right - between the accents, the lexicon, grammar,
              > and phrasing, most mainlanders are quite baffled when we speak to one
              > another. Since we joined Canada however, there has been a great deal
              > of pressure in the education system to beat all this out of us.
              > Presently, most of us can pass for Canadians, and know two grammars.
              >
              > But, this group is for folkspraak and not a discussion of an English
              > dialect. I`ll try to keep it to a dull roar, as they say, and only
              > point out examples where they seems to fit.
              >
              > Victor.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Jarrette <anjarrette@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > David Parke <parked@> wrote: Where
              > are you located Victor? Your dialect sounds interesting.
              > > I remember seeing in the excellent BBC documentary "The Story of
              > > English", an island off the coast of the US when the locals spoke
              what
              > > was described as being a very Elizabethan English. To my ears, they
              > > sounded more like Australians than Americans.
              > > The group is having a bit of a hiatus at the moment, maybe we're all
              > > out of ideas, of just tired of the bickering involved in trying to
              > > find a consensus.
              > > I am not sure if any other members are doing anthing active on this
              > > project at the moment but I am still working on researching
              > > (potential) vocabulary. I've been trying to create FS translations,
              > > not just into English but into some other major languages as well
              > > (German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Russian) which is slowing my rate of
              > > word finding a lot . I might post some examples if I find the
              time and
              > > anybody shows some interest.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > -------------------------------------
              > >
              > > I would love to see your examples of FS translations, especially the
              > English ones (of course) but I also have an interest in the German
              > ones due to my relative familiarity with German. Of course, you might
              > post examples of translations into all those languages.
              > >
              > > My guess is that Victor lives in Newfoundland. That's the only
              > Canadian region that has anything resembling a "dialect"; otherwise
              > English Canada is quite homogeneous, apart from some minor vowel
              > variations and a few rural varieties (e.g. Ottawa Valley) that have
              > features such as a separate 2nd plural pronoun ("youse"). But
              > Newfoundlandish, as I'll call it, sounds quite different from mainland
              > Canadian English and is often partly or mostly unintelligible to
              > mainland Canadians. I don't know anything about its grammar.
              > >
              > > Andrew
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
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