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I fuck horses!

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  • chamavian
    A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born spouse of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen Beatrix. Bernhard used to speak
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 1, 2007
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      A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born spouse
      of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen Beatrix.
      Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent, and so
      he did in English (and probably all languages)...

      Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state visit to
      he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
      Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
      "Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
      "Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
      "I fuck horses!"
      "Pardon?!" Charles asked.
      "Ja, paarden!"

      I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch and
      English and German as well quite well, in other words: three quarters
      of the Dutch populations.

      In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
      but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
      So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
      horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.

      The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
      pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German says "paarden",
      Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
      ["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that, which
      sound just as British English "pardon" to us.

      So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
      "I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
    • stefichjo
      ... LOL! Stephan
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 1, 2007
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        :-D

        LOL!

        Stephan

        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
        >
        > A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born spouse
        > of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen Beatrix.
        > Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent, and so
        > he did in English (and probably all languages)...
        >
        > Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state visit to
        > he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
        > Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
        > "Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
        > "Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
        > "I fuck horses!"
        > "Pardon?!" Charles asked.
        > "Ja, paarden!"
        >
        > I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch and
        > English and German as well quite well, in other words: three quarters
        > of the Dutch populations.
        >
        > In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
        > but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
        > So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
        > horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
        >
        > The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
        > pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German says "paarden",
        > Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
        > ["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that, which
        > sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
        >
        > So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
        > "I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
        >
      • David Parke
        Yup, that s a good one. I found it funny on a different level until I knew about the fokken/fuck connection. Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology; They
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 1, 2007
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          Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level until I
          knew about the fokken/fuck connection.

          Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
          They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is from
          Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light horse).
          Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the origin
          of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse for
          riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)


          stefichjo wrote:

          >:-D
          >
          >LOL!
          >
          >Stephan
          >
          >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >>A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born spouse
          >>of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen Beatrix.
          >>Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent, and so
          >>he did in English (and probably all languages)...
          >>
          >>Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state visit to
          >>he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
          >>Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
          >>"Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
          >>"Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
          >>"I fuck horses!"
          >>"Pardon?!" Charles asked.
          >>"Ja, paarden!"
          >>
          >>I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch and
          >>English and German as well quite well, in other words: three quarters
          >>of the Dutch populations.
          >>
          >>In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
          >>but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
          >>So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
          >>horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
          >>
          >>The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
          >>pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German says "paarden",
          >>Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
          >>["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that, which
          >>sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
          >>
          >>So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
          >>"I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
          >No virus found in this incoming message.
          >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          >Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date: 1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
          >
          >
        • David Parke
          That s got me thinking about the recent American movie Meet the Fockers . Focker is the surname of the main character, Greg Focker, played by Ben Stiller.
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 1, 2007
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            That's got me thinking about the recent American movie "Meet the
            Fockers". "Focker" is the surname of the main character, Greg Focker,
            played by Ben Stiller.
            In most dialects of American English, the short o sound, which is [Q]
            in other non-American English varieties, is pronounced as [a]. This
            makes is almost indistinguishable from the [V] short u sound. So
            "suck" and "sock" sound very similar in American English, as do
            "Focker" and "Fucker". This is the source of many jokes in the film --
            Greg has cousins with names such as Randy Focker and Dom Focker.


            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@...> wrote:
            >
            > Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level until I
            > knew about the fokken/fuck connection.
            >
            > Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
            > They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is from
            > Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light horse).
            > Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the origin
            > of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse for
            > riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)
            >
            >
            > stefichjo wrote:
            >
            > >:-D
            > >
            > >LOL!
            > >
            > >Stephan
            > >
            > >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >>A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born spouse
            > >>of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen Beatrix.
            > >>Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent, and so
            > >>he did in English (and probably all languages)...
            > >>
            > >>Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state visit to
            > >>he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
            > >>Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
            > >>"Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
            > >>"Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
            > >>"I fuck horses!"
            > >>"Pardon?!" Charles asked.
            > >>"Ja, paarden!"
            > >>
            > >>I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch and
            > >>English and German as well quite well, in other words: three quarters
            > >>of the Dutch populations.
            > >>
            > >>In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
            > >>but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
            > >>So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
            > >>horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
            > >>
            > >>The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
            > >>pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German says "paarden",
            > >>Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
            > >>["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that, which
            > >>sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
            > >>
            > >>So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
            > >>"I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
            > >>
            > >>
            > >>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > >
            > >No virus found in this incoming message.
            > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
            > >Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date:
            1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
            > >
            > >
            >
          • chamavian
            Yeah, I know that movie, it s fonny ;-) I think this prono explains why the US is the only country in the world where football isn t popular at all. What
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 1, 2007
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              Yeah, I know that movie, it's fonny ;-)
              I think this prono explains why the US is the only country in the
              world where football isn't popular at all. What American would want
              to play sucker?

              Actually, "Fokker" is a real surname in the Netherlands, you might
              know it from the aircraft company with the same name.
              It means 'breeder' (of cattle, horses etc) of course.

              Chambo




              --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@...> wrote:
              >
              > That's got me thinking about the recent American movie "Meet the
              > Fockers". "Focker" is the surname of the main character, Greg
              Focker,
              > played by Ben Stiller.
              > In most dialects of American English, the short o sound, which is
              [Q]
              > in other non-American English varieties, is pronounced as [a]. This
              > makes is almost indistinguishable from the [V] short u sound. So
              > "suck" and "sock" sound very similar in American English, as do
              > "Focker" and "Fucker". This is the source of many jokes in the
              film --
              > Greg has cousins with names such as Randy Focker and Dom Focker.
              >
              >
              > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level
              until I
              > > knew about the fokken/fuck connection.
              > >
              > > Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
              > > They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is
              from
              > > Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light
              horse).
              > > Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the
              origin
              > > of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse
              for
              > > riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)
              > >
              > >
              > > stefichjo wrote:
              > >
              > > >:-D
              > > >
              > > >LOL!
              > > >
              > > >Stephan
              > > >
              > > >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >>A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born
              spouse
              > > >>of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen
              Beatrix.
              > > >>Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent,
              and so
              > > >>he did in English (and probably all languages)...
              > > >>
              > > >>Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state
              visit to
              > > >>he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally
              with
              > > >>Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
              > > >>"Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
              > > >>"Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German
              accent,
              > > >>"I fuck horses!"
              > > >>"Pardon?!" Charles asked.
              > > >>"Ja, paarden!"
              > > >>
              > > >>I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing
              Dutch and
              > > >>English and German as well quite well, in other words: three
              quarters
              > > >>of the Dutch populations.
              > > >>
              > > >>In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
              > > >>but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
              > > >>So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
              > > >>horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
              > > >>
              > > >>The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this
              is
              > > >>pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German
              says "paarden",
              > > >>Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
              > > >>["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that,
              which
              > > >>sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
              > > >>
              > > >>So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
              > > >>"I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
              > > >>
              > > >>
              > > >>
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >-------------------------------------------------------------------
              -----
              > > >
              > > >No virus found in this incoming message.
              > > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
              > > >Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date:
              > 1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • chamavian
              Yes, that s what they say the word is from... and it must be true, since Old High German had parafrit and pferfrit . Latin paraveredus meant mail-horse.
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 2, 2007
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                Yes, that's what they say the word is from... and it must be true,
                since Old High German had 'parafrit' and 'pferfrit'. Latin
                paraveredus meant mail-horse.
                Personally, I find that rather strange, why would a name for such a
                common animal be borrowed from Latin by the Germanics? And they had
                native words for it, too, like Old High German Hros, Middle Dutch
                hors, hars, hers etc.

                Btw I think to remember the everyday word in Modern German is not
                Pferd, nor Ross, but Gaun. Is that true, Stephan?

                --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@...> wrote:
                >
                > Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level until
                I
                > knew about the fokken/fuck connection.
                >
                > Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
                > They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is
                from
                > Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light horse).
                > Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the
                origin
                > of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse for
                > riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)
                >
                >
                > stefichjo wrote:
                >
                > >:-D
                > >
                > >LOL!
                > >
                > >Stephan
                > >
                > >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > >>A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born
                spouse
                > >>of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen
                Beatrix.
                > >>Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent,
                and so
                > >>he did in English (and probably all languages)...
                > >>
                > >>Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state
                visit to
                > >>he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
                > >>Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
                > >>"Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
                > >>"Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
                > >>"I fuck horses!"
                > >>"Pardon?!" Charles asked.
                > >>"Ja, paarden!"
                > >>
                > >>I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch
                and
                > >>English and German as well quite well, in other words: three
                quarters
                > >>of the Dutch populations.
                > >>
                > >>In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
                > >>but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
                > >>So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
                > >>horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
                > >>
                > >>The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
                > >>pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German
                says "paarden",
                > >>Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
                > >>["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that,
                which
                > >>sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
                > >>
                > >>So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
                > >>"I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >-------------------------------------------------------------------
                -----
                > >
                > >No virus found in this incoming message.
                > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                > >Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date:
                1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
                > >
                > >
                >
              • stefichjo
                _Pferd_ ist the most common word. _Ross_ is known, too, but it is rare (old). I haven t heard of Gaun so far. What is this word? Bye, Stephan
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 2, 2007
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                  _Pferd_ ist the most common word. _Ross_ is known, too, but it is rare
                  (old). I haven't heard of "Gaun" so far. What is this word?

                  Bye,
                  Stephan

                  --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Yes, that's what they say the word is from... and it must be true,
                  > since Old High German had 'parafrit' and 'pferfrit'. Latin
                  > paraveredus meant mail-horse.
                  > Personally, I find that rather strange, why would a name for such a
                  > common animal be borrowed from Latin by the Germanics? And they had
                  > native words for it, too, like Old High German Hros, Middle Dutch
                  > hors, hars, hers etc.
                  >
                  > Btw I think to remember the everyday word in Modern German is not
                  > Pferd, nor Ross, but Gaun. Is that true, Stephan?
                  >
                  > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level until
                  > I
                  > > knew about the fokken/fuck connection.
                  > >
                  > > Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
                  > > They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is
                  > from
                  > > Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light horse).
                  > > Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the
                  > origin
                  > > of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse for
                  > > riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > stefichjo wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >:-D
                  > > >
                  > > >LOL!
                  > > >
                  > > >Stephan
                  > > >
                  > > >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >>A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born
                  > spouse
                  > > >>of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen
                  > Beatrix.
                  > > >>Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent,
                  > and so
                  > > >>he did in English (and probably all languages)...
                  > > >>
                  > > >>Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state
                  > visit to
                  > > >>he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
                  > > >>Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
                  > > >>"Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
                  > > >>"Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
                  > > >>"I fuck horses!"
                  > > >>"Pardon?!" Charles asked.
                  > > >>"Ja, paarden!"
                  > > >>
                  > > >>I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch
                  > and
                  > > >>English and German as well quite well, in other words: three
                  > quarters
                  > > >>of the Dutch populations.
                  > > >>
                  > > >>In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
                  > > >>but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
                  > > >>So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
                  > > >>horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
                  > > >>
                  > > >>The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
                  > > >>pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German
                  > says "paarden",
                  > > >>Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
                  > > >>["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that,
                  > which
                  > > >>sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
                  > > >>
                  > > >>So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
                  > > >>"I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >-------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > -----
                  > > >
                  > > >No virus found in this incoming message.
                  > > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                  > > >Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date:
                  > 1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • David Parke
                  Pferfrit etc started out as a specialised word for one particular type of horse. The original Germanic words such as Ross survived to the present. To find out
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 2, 2007
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                    Pferfrit etc started out as a specialised word for one particular type
                    of horse. The original Germanic words such as Ross survived to the
                    present. To find out why Pferd/paard replaced Ross/ros, I would first
                    look out the when this change occurred and what was going on in the
                    history of Germany/Netherlands at that time.



                    --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > _Pferd_ ist the most common word. _Ross_ is known, too, but it is rare
                    > (old). I haven't heard of "Gaun" so far. What is this word?
                    >
                    > Bye,
                    > Stephan
                    >
                    > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Yes, that's what they say the word is from... and it must be true,
                    > > since Old High German had 'parafrit' and 'pferfrit'. Latin
                    > > paraveredus meant mail-horse.
                    > > Personally, I find that rather strange, why would a name for such a
                    > > common animal be borrowed from Latin by the Germanics? And they had
                    > > native words for it, too, like Old High German Hros, Middle Dutch
                    > > hors, hars, hers etc.
                    > >
                    > > Btw I think to remember the everyday word in Modern German is not
                    > > Pferd, nor Ross, but Gaun. Is that true, Stephan?
                    > >
                    > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level until
                    > > I
                    > > > knew about the fokken/fuck connection.
                    > > >
                    > > > Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
                    > > > They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is
                    > > from
                    > > > Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light horse).
                    > > > Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the
                    > > origin
                    > > > of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse for
                    > > > riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > stefichjo wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > >:-D
                    > > > >
                    > > > >LOL!
                    > > > >
                    > > > >Stephan
                    > > > >
                    > > > >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >>A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born
                    > > spouse
                    > > > >>of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen
                    > > Beatrix.
                    > > > >>Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent,
                    > > and so
                    > > > >>he did in English (and probably all languages)...
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >>Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state
                    > > visit to
                    > > > >>he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
                    > > > >>Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
                    > > > >>"Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
                    > > > >>"Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
                    > > > >>"I fuck horses!"
                    > > > >>"Pardon?!" Charles asked.
                    > > > >>"Ja, paarden!"
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >>I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch
                    > > and
                    > > > >>English and German as well quite well, in other words: three
                    > > quarters
                    > > > >>of the Dutch populations.
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >>In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
                    > > > >>but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
                    > > > >>So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
                    > > > >>horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >>The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
                    > > > >>pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German
                    > > says "paarden",
                    > > > >>Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
                    > > > >>["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that,
                    > > which
                    > > > >>sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >>So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
                    > > > >>"I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >>
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >-------------------------------------------------------------------
                    > > -----
                    > > > >
                    > > > >No virus found in this incoming message.
                    > > > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                    > > > >Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date:
                    > > 1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Michael Koether
                    Maybe he meant Gaul? Gaul is quiet common in the German language, but it s like a somehow degrading word for a male horse, I d say. E.g. alter Gaul vs.
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 2, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Maybe he meant Gaul?

                      Gaul is quiet common in the German language, but it's like a somehow
                      degrading word for a male horse, I'd say.

                      E.g. alter Gaul vs. pr├Ąchtiger Hengst.

                      Greetings
                      Michael


                      stefichjo schrieb:
                      > _Pferd_ ist the most common word. _Ross_ is known, too, but it is rare
                      > (old). I haven't heard of "Gaun" so far. What is this word?
                      >
                      > Bye,
                      > Stephan
                      >
                      > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
                      >> Yes, that's what they say the word is from... and it must be true,
                      >> since Old High German had 'parafrit' and 'pferfrit'. Latin
                      >> paraveredus meant mail-horse.
                      >> Personally, I find that rather strange, why would a name for such a
                      >> common animal be borrowed from Latin by the Germanics? And they had
                      >> native words for it, too, like Old High German Hros, Middle Dutch
                      >> hors, hars, hers etc.
                      >>
                      >> Btw I think to remember the everyday word in Modern German is not
                      >> Pferd, nor Ross, but Gaun. Is that true, Stephan?
                      >>
                      >> --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
                      >>> Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level until
                      >> I
                      >>> knew about the fokken/fuck connection.
                      >>>
                      >>> Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
                      >>> They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is
                      >> from
                      >>> Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light horse).
                      >>> Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the
                      >> origin
                      >>> of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse for
                      >>> riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>> stefichjo wrote:
                      >>>
                      >>>> :-D
                      >>>>
                      >>>> LOL!
                      >>>>
                      >>>> Stephan
                      >>>>
                      >>>> --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>> A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born
                      >> spouse
                      >>>>> of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen
                      >> Beatrix.
                      >>>>> Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent,
                      >> and so
                      >>>>> he did in English (and probably all languages)...
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state
                      >> visit to
                      >>>>> he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
                      >>>>> Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
                      >>>>> "Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
                      >>>>> "Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
                      >>>>> "I fuck horses!"
                      >>>>> "Pardon?!" Charles asked.
                      >>>>> "Ja, paarden!"
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch
                      >> and
                      >>>>> English and German as well quite well, in other words: three
                      >> quarters
                      >>>>> of the Dutch populations.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
                      >>>>> but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
                      >>>>> So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
                      >>>>> horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
                      >>>>> pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German
                      >> says "paarden",
                      >>>>> Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
                      >>>>> ["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that,
                      >> which
                      >>>>> sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
                      >>>>> "I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>> -------------------------------------------------------------------
                      >> -----
                      >>>> No virus found in this incoming message.
                      >>>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                      >>>> Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date:
                      >> 1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Browse the draft word lists!
                      > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
                      > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
                      >
                      > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
                      > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • stefichjo
                      Thanks Michael. I was too tired to see that Gaul was the word Ingmar meant. Gaul exists and sounds degrading to me. Bye, Stephan
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 3, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thanks Michael. I was too tired to see that "Gaul" was the word Ingmar
                        meant.

                        "Gaul" exists and sounds degrading to me.

                        Bye,
                        Stephan

                        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Michael Koether <dumpdi@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Maybe he meant Gaul?
                        >
                        > Gaul is quiet common in the German language, but it's like a somehow
                        > degrading word for a male horse, I'd say.
                        >
                        > E.g. alter Gaul vs. pr├Ąchtiger Hengst.
                        >
                        > Greetings
                        > Michael
                        >
                        >
                        > stefichjo schrieb:
                        > > _Pferd_ ist the most common word. _Ross_ is known, too, but it is rare
                        > > (old). I haven't heard of "Gaun" so far. What is this word?
                        > >
                        > > Bye,
                        > > Stephan
                        > >
                        > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                        > >> Yes, that's what they say the word is from... and it must be true,
                        > >> since Old High German had 'parafrit' and 'pferfrit'. Latin
                        > >> paraveredus meant mail-horse.
                        > >> Personally, I find that rather strange, why would a name for such a
                        > >> common animal be borrowed from Latin by the Germanics? And they had
                        > >> native words for it, too, like Old High German Hros, Middle Dutch
                        > >> hors, hars, hers etc.
                        > >>
                        > >> Btw I think to remember the everyday word in Modern German is not
                        > >> Pferd, nor Ross, but Gaun. Is that true, Stephan?
                        > >>
                        > >> --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
                        > >>> Yup, that's a good one. I found it funny on a different level until
                        > >> I
                        > >>> knew about the fokken/fuck connection.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> Pferd/paard have an interesting etymology;
                        > >>> They are from Latin paraveredus, parafredus, parafridus which is
                        > >> from
                        > >>> Greek para- (as in paranormal etc) + Latin veredus (a light horse).
                        > >>> Veredus is a word of Gaulish origin. The same Latin word is the
                        > >> origin
                        > >>> of French palefroi and English palfrey (both mean a light horse for
                        > >>> riding only, as opposed to warfare or drawing wagons)
                        > >>>
                        > >>>
                        > >>> stefichjo wrote:
                        > >>>
                        > >>>> :-D
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> LOL!
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> Stephan
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>> A Dutch joke, about our late Prince Bernhard, the German born
                        > >> spouse
                        > >>>>> of late Queen Mother Juliana, mother of our present Queen
                        > >> Beatrix.
                        > >>>>> Bernhard used to speak Dutch with a very strong German accent,
                        > >> and so
                        > >>>>> he did in English (and probably all languages)...
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> Former Dutch Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard payed a state
                        > >> visit to
                        > >>>>> he UK, and during dinner at night he was talking informally with
                        > >>>>> Prince Charles, who he was sitting next to.
                        > >>>>> "Say, Bernhard," Charles said, "Do you have any hobbies?"
                        > >>>>> "Oh ja," Bernhard replied proudly, with his broad German accent,
                        > >>>>> "I fuck horses!"
                        > >>>>> "Pardon?!" Charles asked.
                        > >>>>> "Ja, paarden!"
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> I guess this joke will be understood just by people knowing Dutch
                        > >> and
                        > >>>>> English and German as well quite well, in other words: three
                        > >> quarters
                        > >>>>> of the Dutch populations.
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> In Dutch the verb "fokken" is the cognate of English "to fuck",
                        > >>>>> but "fokken" means "to breed" or "to rear" and not "to fuck".
                        > >>>>> So what Berhard actually meant to say in English was "I breed
                        > >>>>> horses", but he translated Dutch "ik fok paarden" otherwise.
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> The joke is that when Charles replied to that "Pardon?!", this is
                        > >>>>> pronounced almost exactly the same as when a German
                        > >> says "paarden",
                        > >>>>> Dutch for "horses". Dutch "paarden" is normally pronounced as
                        > >>>>> ["pa:rd@] , but a German accent will make ["pha:d-n] of that,
                        > >> which
                        > >>>>> sound just as British English "pardon" to us.
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> So Prince Bernhard thought this conversation was:
                        > >>>>> "I breed horses." "Horses?" "Yes, horses!"
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> -------------------------------------------------------------------
                        > >> -----
                        > >>>> No virus found in this incoming message.
                        > >>>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        > >>>> Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date:
                        > >> 1/09/2007 4:20 p.m.
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Browse the draft word lists!
                        > > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
                        > > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
                        > >
                        > > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
                        > > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
                        > >
                        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
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