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Re: Main dialekt

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  • atam_skuuk
    Ig vet nit so mykk um sprak, so... skrif Ingmar in sinn eigen dialekt eder in sprak? Ig kann nit see forsjill. xD
    Message 1 of 92 , Aug 5, 2007
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      Ig vet nit so mykk um sprak, so... skrif Ingmar in sinn eigen dialekt
      eder in sprak? Ig kann nit see forsjill. xD

      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, Stephan Schneider <sts@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hee Ingmar!
      >
      > Fur mi er altid de tid fur endwickele ny dialecten ond fur schappe
      > consens. :-)
      >
      > Ond it er god, wan wi ferseuke to gebruke onser egen dialecten fur en
      > lytt wil.
      >
      > Mid mannig greuten,
      > Stephan
      >
      > chamavian schrieb:
      > > Hei folk!
      > >
      > > Ja, ig wete, dat war lang tid befor ji hoere enigwat fran mi.
      > > Ig ha nig lesed dis website mennig de latest maneds, doch nu
      > > ig ha sen Atams ny dialekt, for de fyrst mal ig foelede weder en
      > > lyttel enthusiasme. Ig forsta self okso nig warfor, doch ig mag lide
      > > sin dialekt...
      > >
      > > Magsche for de kommend tid wi mot stoppe probere to make en enhedlig
      > > sprak, doch geve al folk hir de schans to antwekkele der eigen
      > > dialekts? On nig se to ofte to de lyttel details al de tid, doch
      > > finde de groet line.
      > >
      > > No ja, ig wete dat okso nig, doch so ig alrede segede: ig finde
      > > Atamsprak en frisch on ny antwekkeling.
      > >
      > > Mid de hertlig groetenis af
      > > Ingmar Roerdinkholder (Chamavian)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "atam_skuuk" <atam_skuuk@>
      > > wrote:
      > >
      > >> Hello again. I've been working a bit on my own dialect now, and
      > >>
      > > first
      > >
      > >> I started with the personal pronouns.
      > >>
      > >> ___________________________________________________________________
      > >>
      > >> I:
      > >> Swedish: jag
      > >> Älvdalska: ig
      > >> Norweigan: jeg, eg
      > >> Danish: jeg
      > >> Icelandic: ég (pronounced jeg)
      > >> Faroese: eg
      > >> German: ich
      > >> Dutch: ik
      > >> English: I
      > >>
      > >> It seems varieties of ik/ig/ek/eg is the dominating form.
      > >> I'd prefer ig.
      > >>
      > >> Me:
      > >> Swedish, Danish, Icelandic: mig
      > >> Norweigan and Faroese: meg + faroese mær
      > >> German: mich
      > >> Dutch and English: me
      > >>
      > >> These are all similar, and I'd probably skip g/ch in the end, as it
      > >> isn't pronounced in any Norse language, and isn't present in Dutch
      > >>
      > > or
      > >
      > >> English at all.
      > >> Mei, it'll be (ei pronounced like ey, not like German/Dutch ei).
      > >>
      > >> My/mine:
      > >> Norse: minn/min, mitt/mit
      > >> German: mein
      > >> Dutch: mijn
      > >> English: my, mine
      > >>
      > >> It appears that in German mine, Dutch mijn (depending on dialect)
      > >>
      > > and
      > >
      > >> English mine the pronouncation is thesame, while the diphtong has
      > >> disappeared in Scandy. To make an as logical diphtong as possible,
      > >>
      > > I'd
      > >
      > >> use <ai>.
      > >> So, main. Plural maine.
      > >>
      > >> You:
      > >> Scandy: du
      > >> Icelandic: þú
      > >> Faroese: tu
      > >> German: du
      > >> Dutch: jij
      > >> English: you/thou
      > >>
      > >> It's d/t/þ in all languages exept for English, and you can say thou
      > >>
      > > in
      > >
      > >> English, so I'd go with du here.
      > >> You is du.
      > >>
      > >> You:
      > >> Swedish and Danish: dig
      > >> Norweigan: deg
      > >> Icelandic: þér, þíð
      > >> Faroese: teg, tær
      > >> German: dich
      > >> Dutch: je
      > >> English: you/thee
      > >>
      > >> Once again, d/t/þ is dominating, and there is an English th-version
      > >> available, so I'll make it a direct correspondant to mei.
      > >> And that is dei.
      > >>
      > >> Your(s):
      > >> Scandy: din, ditt/dit
      > >> Icelandic: þinn, þín, þitt
      > >> Faroese: pretty sure it's tin, titt
      > >> German: dein
      > >> Dutch: jouw
      > >> English: your/thy, yours/thine
      > >>
      > >> As there actually are thy and thine in English, I'd suggest dain.
      > >> dain, it is. Plural daine.
      > >>
      > >> He:
      > >> Norse: han/hann
      > >> German: er
      > >> Dutch: hij
      > >> English: he
      > >>
      > >> Obviously, it'll have to start with h, so the question is what vowel
      > >> to use. As both English and Dutch sound just about thesame, I'd go
      > >> with an i.
      > >> He, the e pronounced like /e:/.
      > >>
      > >> Him:
      > >> Swedish: honom
      > >> Danish and Norweigan: ham
      > >> Icelandic and Faroese: honum
      > >> German: er
      > >> Dutch: hem
      > >> English: him
      > >>
      > >> All of them, exept for german <er>, are <h*m>. I'd stick to only one
      > >> vowel in between, as in ham/him/hem.
      > >> I'd pick hemm.
      > >>
      > >> His: I'll just add <s> to <he>.
      > >> hess.
      > >>
      > >> She:
      > >> Swedish and Faroese: hon
      > >> Danish and Norweigan: hun
      > >> Icelandic: hún (all the Norse ones are pronounced thesame, just
      > >> spelled differently)
      > >> German: sie
      > >> Dutch: zij
      > >>
      > >> Since all the Norse ones are pronounced thesame, I'd say they're all
      > >> one language in this case, leaving us with the majority being
      > >> variations of English she. I like the sh-sound in the English she,
      > >>
      > > so
      > >
      > >> I'll keep that.
      > >> That makes it sje.
      > >>
      > >> Her:
      > >> Scandy: henne
      > >> Icelandic and Faroese: hana, henni + Icelandic hennar
      > >> German: sie
      > >> Dutch: haar
      > >> English: her
      > >>
      > >> Now, all of them, except for German <sie> begin with ha/he, so
      > >>
      > > that's
      > >
      > >> what I'll use. I think Icelandic hennar is a good mix between
      > >>
      > > haar/her
      > >
      > >> and henne/henni.
      > >> So I'll use hennar.
      > >>
      > >> Her: I'll add an <s> again.
      > >> hennars
      > >>
      > >> It:
      > >> Scandy: den, det
      > >> Icelandic: þann, það, því
      > >> Faroese: tann, tað, tí
      > >> German: es
      > >> Dutch: het
      > >> English: it
      > >>
      > >> Obviously, English <it> and Dutch <het> share thesame etomythology,
      > >> especially since the <h> in Dutch <het> is not present in many of
      > >>
      > > its
      > >
      > >> dialects. So obviosly the (h)et/it form is the one that should be
      > >>
      > > used.
      > >
      > >> I'd go with ett.
      > >>
      > >> Its:
      > >> Scandy: dess
      > >> Icelandic: þess
      > >> Faroese: tess
      > >> German: sein
      > >> Dutch: zijn
      > >> English: its
      > >>
      > >> Now, German/Dutch sein/zijn appear a little strange to me, as in
      > >> Norse, sin/sinn isn't used all the time, but we use dess/þess/tess
      > >>
      > > in
      > >
      > >> some cases, and sin/sinn in some cases (thesame grammar as in
      > >> Spanish), so I'd stick to that as well. As <it> is <ett> in my
      > >>
      > > accent,
      > >
      > >> <its> will simply be <etts>.
      > >> So, etts it is.
      > >>
      > >> We:
      > >> Scandy: vi
      > >> Icelandic: við, vér
      > >> Faroese: vit
      > >> German: wir
      > >> Dutch: wij
      > >> English: we
      > >>
      > >> I suppose Icelandic/Faroese/German ð/t/r were originally added
      > >>
      > > because
      > >
      > >> of some grammar, so I'll remove those, making the words all become
      > >> varieties of we/ve.
      > >> As I don't want the w-sound in my accent, it'll be vi.
      > >>
      > >> Us:
      > >> Scandy: oss
      > >> Icelandic: okkur
      > >> Faroese: okkum
      > >> German: uns
      > >> Dutch: ons
      > >> English: us
      > >>
      > >> In Norse, n's tend to disappear, making oss instead of ons. It also,
      > >> though less often, happens in English, as it has done in this case,
      > >> making us instead of uns. I'd stick to using no n here either.
      > >> This makes oss, for nice pronouncation.
      > >>
      > >> Our(s):
      > >> Scandy: vår, vårt
      > >> Icelandic: okkar
      > >> Faroese: okkara
      > >> German: unser
      > >> Dutch: ons
      > >> English: our, ours
      > >>
      > >> Usually, Norse remove v/w in front of o/u, as for example English
      > >> <wonder>, <word> and <wurm> are <under>, <ord> and <orm> in Scandy,
      > >> but in this case Scandy has actually added a <v> instead, making
      > >> <vår>, instead of <år>. I'm not going to use that v, though.
      > >> To make it as simple, yet understandable, as possible, I'll make or.
      > >> Plural ore.
      > >>
      > >> You:
      > >> Swedish: ni
      > >> Danish and Old Swedish: I
      > >> Norweigan (depending on dialect): dere, dokk
      > >> Icelandic: þið
      > >> Faroese: tit
      > >> German: Sie
      > >> Dutch: jullie
      > >> English: you/ye
      > >>
      > >> Now, this is one huge problem. None of these are similar to
      > >>
      > > eachother
      > >
      > >> (exept for Danish -> Old Swedish and Icelandic -> Faroese). I don't
      > >> really know what to use at all, but because of Dutch U (which is
      > >> similar to English you, which might as well have been spelled U as
      > >> well), I'll stick to something similar for the moment.
      > >> I'll use iu (pronounced /i:u/) until further notice.
      > >>
      > >> You:
      > >> Swedish: er
      > >> Danish: jer
      > >> Norweigan: dere, dokk
      > >> Icelandic: ?
      > >> Faroese: tykkum
      > >> German: Sie?
      > >> Dutch: jullie?
      > >> English: you
      > >>
      > >> Once again very tricky. I'll slightly change the previous <iu> for
      > >> this one.
      > >> So, ie (pronounced /i:e/, there is no <ie> like German <ie> in my
      > >> dialect).
      > >>
      > >> Your(s):
      > >> Swedish: er, ert
      > >> Danish: jeres
      > >> Norweigan: deres, dokks
      > >> Icelandic: ?
      > >> Faroese: tykkara
      > >> German: ihr
      > >> Dutch: jullies?, uw
      > >>
      > >> Now, I can easily relate Swedish er, Danish jeres and German ihr to
      > >> eachother, so I'll use that.
      > >> I'll spell it ir. Plural ire.
      > >>
      > >> They:
      > >> Scandy: de
      > >> Icelandic: þeir, þær, þau
      > >> Faroese: teir, tær, tey
      > >> German: sie
      > >> Dutch: zij
      > >> English: they
      > >>
      > >> Obviously, all of these are related to eachother in some way, to
      > >>
      > > it's
      > >
      > >> not hard to create a Folkspråk equivalent.
      > >> I'll go with di.
      > >>
      > >> Them:
      > >> Scandy: dem
      > >> Icelandic: þeim
      > >> Faroese: teimum
      > >> German: sie
      > >> Dutch: hen
      > >> English: them
      > >>
      > >> Once again, most of these are ethomythologically related, so it's
      > >>
      > > easy
      > >
      > >> to create my version.
      > >> And that is demm.
      > >>
      > >> Their:
      > >> Swedish: deras
      > >> Norweigan and Danish: deres?
      > >> Icelandic: þeirra
      > >> Faroese: teirra
      > >> German: ihr
      > >> Dutch: hun
      > >> English: their
      > >>
      > >> As the English and Norse ones share thesame ethomythology, I'll use
      > >>
      > > a
      > >
      > >> version of their words.
      > >> In this case deir. Plural deire.
      > >>
      > >> Then we have the one that has no equivalent in English, but is
      > >> varieties of s/z*n in the other languages.
      > >> I'll call this one sain. Plural saine.
      > >>
      > >> Own:
      > >> Scandy: egen
      > >> Icelandic: eiginn
      > >> German, Dutch and Nynorsk: eigen
      > >> English: own
      > >>
      > >> The letter <g> tend to transform into v/w between the languages,
      > >> making English <own> ethomythologically related to the other ones.
      > >>
      > > I'd
      > >
      > >> use the g, of course.
      > >> eigen sounds good to me. Plural eigne.
      > >>
      > >> One's:
      > >> As I'll call one <enn>, this will be enns.
      > >>
      > >> Thus, this is what I have so far:
      > >>
      > >> First person singular: ig, mei, main, maine
      > >> Second person singular: du, dei, dain, daine
      > >> Third person singular neuter: ett, ett, etts, etts
      > >> Third person singular masculine: he, hemm, hess, hess
      > >> Third person singular feminine: sje, hennar, hennars, hennars
      > >> First person plural: vi, oss, or, ore
      > >> Second person plural: ie, iu, ir, ire
      > >> Third person plural: di, demm, deir, deire
      > >>
      > >> + sain, saine
      > >> + eigen, eigne
      > >>
      > >> ___________________________________________________________________
      > >>
      > >> Numbers
      > >> Swedish: en/ett, två/tu, tre, fyra, fem, sex, sju, åtta, nio, tio
      > >> Norweigan: en/et, to, tre, fyre, fem, seks, sju, åtte, ni, ti
      > >> Danish: en/et, to, tre, fyre, fem, seks, syv, åtte, nie, tie
      > >> Icelandic: einn/eitt/ei, tveir/tvö, þrír/þrjú, fjórir/fjögur, fimm,
      > >> sex, sjö, átta, níu, tíu
      > >> German: ein, zwei, drei, fier, funf, sechs, sieben, acht, neun, zehn
      > >> Dutch: een, twee, drie, vier, vijf, zes, zeven, acht, negen, tien
      > >> English: one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten
      > >>
      > >> Now, I don't want to write down how I came up with all of my
      > >>
      > > versions,
      > >
      > >> but I should say something about the number seven, which is <sju> in
      > >> Swedish and Norweigan and <sjö> in Icelandic, while it's <syv> in
      > >> Danish. Between Germanic language, consonant + y tend to turn into
      > >> consonant + ju between different words (SYv -> SJU). The <v> in
      > >>
      > > Danish
      > >
      > >> <syv> is easily explained by the b/v in the other languages.
      > >> Alright, here are my numbers:
      > >>
      > >> enn, tvo, tre, fir, fif, seks, sev, akkt, ni, ti
      > >>
      > >> I skipped the -en endings in sev(en), ni(en) and ti(en). As you also
      > >> can see, I don't use <x> or <ck>.
      > >>
      > >> ___________________________________________________________________
      > >>
      > >> An overview of my alphabet:
      > >>
      > >> Aa Bb Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Yy
      > >>
      > >> As you see, only 21 letters are used. Cc, Qq, Ww, Xx and Zz are
      > >> removed, since I don't have any use of them, when Kk, Ss, Vv and
      > >>
      > > KSks
      > >
      > >> easily can take their places.
      > >>
      > >> ___________________________________________________________________
      > >>
      > >> Now for some other basic words.
      > >>
      > >> That
      > >> Scandy: den (der/där), det (der/där)
      > >> Icelandic: þann, það, því
      > >> Faroese: tann, tað, tí
      > >> German: das
      > >> Dutch: dat
      > >> English: that
      > >>
      > >> So, obviously dat.
      > >>
      > >> This
      > >> Scandy: den her/här, denna, det her/här, detta
      > >> Icelandic: þetta, þessi
      > >> Faroese: tetta?, tessi?
      > >> German: diese
      > >> Dutch: dit
      > >> English: this
      > >>
      > >> I'll have diss.
      > >>
      > >> These
      > >> Scandy: dessa
      > >> Icelandic: þessir, þessar, þessi
      > >> Faroese: tessa?/tessir?/tessar?
      > >> German: diese
      > >> Dutch: deze
      > >> English: these
      > >>
      > >> disse.
      > >>
      > >> And
      > >> Norse except for Swedish: og
      > >> Swedish: och
      > >> German: und
      > >> Dutch: en
      > >> English: and
      > >>
      > >> Hm... this one's hard. But... I'll have un.
      > >>
      > >> Or
      > >> I've discussed the mythology of this word with you before. eder.
      > >>
      > >> If
      > >> Scandy: om/hvis
      > >> Icelandic: ef
      > >> Faroese: ?
      > >> German: wenn
      > >> Dutch: als
      > >> English: if
      > >>
      > >> English and Icelandic share thesame ethomythology, so I'll use ef.
      > >>
      > >> But
      > >> Scandy and Faroese: men
      > >> Icelandic: en
      > >> German: aber
      > >> Dutch: maar
      > >> English: but
      > >>
      > >> I'll use the <m> stem with neither <n> or <r> at the end.
      > >> Thus, ma.
      > >>
      > >> Then
      > >> Swedish: då
      > >> Danish and Norweigan: da
      > >> Icelandic: þá
      > >> Faroese: tá?
      > >> German: dann
      > >> Dutch: dan
      > >>
      > >> Obviously all these words share thesame ethomythology, just that <n>
      > >> has been removed in Norse, as in many other cases.
      > >> I'll use dann.
      > >>
      > >> Who
      > >> Swedish: vem
      > >> Danish and Norweigan and older Swedish: hvem
      > >> Icelandic: hver
      > >> Faroese: hvør
      > >> German: wer
      > >> Dutch: wie
      > >> English: who
      > >>
      > >> German, Icelandic and Faroese are similar, so I'll use ve.
      > >>
      > >> What
      > >> Swedish: vad
      > >> Danish and older Swedish: hvad
      > >> Norweigan: hva, kva
      > >> Icelandic and Faroese: hvað
      > >> German: wat
      > >> Dutch: wat
      > >> English: what
      > >>
      > >> No question about it; vat.
      > >>
      > >> How
      > >> Swedish: hur, hurdan
      > >> Danish and Norweigan: hvor, hvordan
      > >> Icelandic: hvernig, hversu, hve
      > >> Faroese: hvussu
      > >> German: wie
      > >> Dutch: hoe
      > >> English: how
      > >>
      > >> I should probably use the hu/ho beginning present in some of these.
      > >> Why not simply hu? ;P
      > >>
      > >> When
      > >> Swedish: när
      > >> Norweigan and Danish: når
      > >> Icelandic: hvenær
      > >> Faroese: nær
      > >> German: wenn
      > >> Dutch: wanneer
      > >>
      > >> Now, you can actually say <hvornår> in Norweigan and Danish, making
      > >>
      > > it
      > >
      > >> similar to Dutch <wanneer> and Icelandic <hvenær>.
      > >> If I use venner, it'll be similar to all of them, so I'll use that.
      > >>
      > >> Where
      > >> Swedish: var, vart
      > >> Norweigan and Danish: hvor
      > >> Icelandic and Faroese: hvar + Icelandic hvert
      > >> German: wo
      > >> Dutch: waar
      > >> English: where
      > >>
      > >> No doubt about it; var.
      > >>
      > >> Why
      > >> Swedish: varför
      > >> Danish and Norweigan: hvorfor
      > >> Icelandic and Faroese: hví
      > >> German: warum
      > >> Dutch: waarom
      > >> English: why
      > >>
      > >> Now, this is a little tricky. English, Icelandic and Faroese
      > >>
      > > obviously
      > >
      > >> share thesame ethomythology, but all the other ones begin with some
      > >> variety of <var>.
      > >> Allthough, vatfor might work well, as it is similar so "what for?"
      > >>
      > > in
      > >
      > >> most Germanic languages (if not all :D).
      > >>
      > >> There
      > >> I don't need to write this down; dar.
      > >>
      > >> Because
      > >> Swedish: för (att), därför (att), ty
      > >> Norweigan and Danish: for (at), derfor (at)
      > >> Icelandic: því
      > >> Faroese: tí
      > >> German: weil, dafür
      > >> Dutch: omdat, daarvoor
      > >> English: because, therefor
      > >>
      > >> It doesn't need much though to it; darfor.
      > >>
      > >> So
      > >> Scandy: så
      > >> Icelandic: svo
      > >> Faroese: so
      > >> German: so
      > >> Dutch: zo
      > >> English: so
      > >>
      > >> so.
      > >>
      > >> Not
      > >> Swedish: inte, icke, ej
      > >> Norweigan: ikke, ei
      > >> Danish: ikke, ej
      > >> German: nicht
      > >> Dutch: niet
      > >> English: not
      > >>
      > >> It obviously has to have the n*t stem. I'd go with nit.
      > >>
      > >> Yes
      > >> Scandy, Faroese, German and Dutch: ja
      > >> Icelandic: já
      > >> English: yes
      > >>
      > >> ja... xD
      > >>
      > >> No
      > >> Swedish and Danish: nej
      > >> Norweigan, Icelandic and Faroese: nei
      > >> German: nein
      > >> Dutch: nee
      > >> English: no
      > >>
      > >> nei.
      > >>
      > >> Maybe
      > >> Swedish: kanske, måske, kanhända, måhända, må vara, möjligtvis
      > >> Norweigan: kanskje, måskje, kanhende, måhende, må være
      > >> Danish: kanske, måske, kanhende, måhende, må være
      > >> Icelandic: kannski, má vera
      > >> Faroese: ?
      > >> German: möglicherweise
      > >> Dutch: ?
      > >> English: maybe
      > >>
      > >> Now, most of these tend to mean <can/may be/happen/occur>, so, I
      > >>
      > > will
      > >
      > >> use something like that.
      > >> maiskei seems good to me, making making <maie> mean <may> and
      > >>
      > > <skeie>
      > >
      > >> mean <happen>.
      > >>
      > >> To (in front of verbs)
      > >> Swedish: att
      > >> Danish: at
      > >> Norweigan and spoken Danish and Swedish: å
      > >> Icelandic: að
      > >> Faroese: at?
      > >> German: zu?
      > >> Dutch: te, aan?
      > >> English: to
      > >>
      > >> te sounds good to me.
      > >>
      > >> To (as in "send a letter to someone")
      > >> I'll go with te here as well.
      > >>
      > >> From
      > >> Swedish: från (frå in my dialect)
      > >> Norweigan and Danish: fra
      > >> Nynorsk: frå
      > >> German: von
      > >> Dutch: van
      > >> English: from
      > >>
      > >> It seems fron is good.
      > >> ___________________________________________________________________
      > >>
      > >> Alright, I can't go on like this forever, so I'll stop now, but I
      > >> would obviously like to ask what you think.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Browse the draft word lists!
      > > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
      > > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
      > >
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    • stefichjo
      ... Korrekt! Lets hav ik nit haved de tid fur goe to de bokschoppen. Dannuch tank di, Ingmar. Grøten, Stephan
      Message 92 of 92 , Aug 20, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@...> wrote:
        >
        > Wel, ja, man ligge up, on slove mid en maitresse, doch ig tenke nik
        > dat de word TING is richtig hir ;-)
        >
        > On wat Stephan kalle "wese in rusch", is "being high" in Engelisch,
        > in Nederlandisch "in een roes zijn" , in Diutisch "Rausch"?

        Korrekt!

        Lets hav ik nit haved de tid fur goe to de bokschoppen. Dannuch tank
        di, Ingmar.

        Grøten,
        Stephan

        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Watt betyd "maitresse"? Iss datt en wek ting upp datt menn ligge
        > ond
        > > slape? ;-)
        > >
        > > chamavian wrote:
        > >
        > > >Re: ae, oe, ue
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >Ja, drugs er oevel, oller better: dei kan wese oevel. In Nederland,
        > > >wi kenne soft-drugs on hard-drugs. Soft-drugs er weed (marihuana)
        > on
        > > >haschisch, hard-drugs er coke, heroine etc.
        > > >Man kan smoeke soft-drugs uten problem, in coffee-shops oller in
        > de
        > > >park oller in hus, dat is nik forbiuded, man kan okso koepe dat.
        > > >Doch hard-drugs nik, dei er forbiuded okso in Nederland.
        > > >
        > > >Ig ha eted space-cake okso, ig tenke alrede befor mer den twyntig
        > > >jare nu, doch ig ware nik so stoned as di.
        > > >Doch ig ha smoeked mennig joints mid marihuana in min jung jare, on
        > > >later ig ha foeled de negativ effects af dat, darfor ig ha stopped
        > to
        > > >bruke weed mer den ten jare alrede.
        > > >
        > > >Nu ja, befor en oller two jare ig ha finded en lyttel haschisch, on
        > > >Barbara (min fru) on ig ha smoeked dat. Dat ware lekker, doch ig ha
        > > >nik enig problem to blive uten drugs.
        > > >
        > > >Doch ig kenne okso mer exotisch soft-drugs:
        > > >Forgesterdag, ig ha eted kola-nytte, dat komme fran West-Afrika
        > > >(min maitresse komme fran dar) on ig kenne okso Qat, en krud fran
        > > >Oest-Afrika.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>BTW: Droges are yvel, m'kay.
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >>--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@> wrote:
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >>>Infall wese du gelik de jung kiwis datt beseuke Amsterdam, will
        > du
        > > >>>probere/preuve de mannig "coffee shops" datt kann wese funden in
        > > >>>
        > > >>>
        > > >datt
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>scheun stadd. Ikk warne di, nejt to ete de "space cakes". Ikk ha
        > > >>>
        > > >>>
        > > >eten
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>ens en "space cake". Ett tynkd to mi to have nen folg (effekt).
        > > >>>
        > > >>>
        > > >Darfor
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>ha ikk eten en andere ond dann en andere. Seven oren later,
        > after
        > > >>>
        > > >>>
        > > >hadd
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>ikk gan in bedd, wekkd ikk upp syksinnig "stoned". Doch ikk
        > slapd
        > > >>>
        > > >>>
        > > >upny
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>ond in de morgen wass ikk absolut klar-sinnig. Also ferbrukd ikk
        > > >>>manning geld!
        > > >>>
        > > >>>--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        > > >>>
        > > >>>
        > > >>>>Wow, so you'll visit A'dam this weekend! I heard the weather
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >will be
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>>nice then. If you have the chance, go to the Athenaeum book
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >shop,
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>>they have a lot about linguistics. And for second hand books,
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >go to
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>>De Slegte, they have a lot old and new and sometimes rare
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >interesting
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>>books, not to expensive. But as you're from Berlin, maybe
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >Amsterdam
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>>won't be that exiting for you, for it's much smaller. But then
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >again,
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>>A'dam has a lot more exotic beauties, to name something.
        > > >>>>Hope you have a good time... and I'm curious whether you'll be
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >able
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >>>>to make much of (spoken) Dutch ;-)
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >>>>
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >-------------------------------------------------------------------
        > -----
        > > >
        > > >No virus found in this incoming message.
        > > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        > > >Version: 7.5.476 / Virus Database: 269.11.17/951 - Release Date:
        > 13/08/2007 10:15 a.m.
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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