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  • peter21691
    Hello all, Just joined the group and thought it polite to say hello. I will now go and lurk until I have a better feel for what is going on and have something
    Message 1 of 12 , May 25, 2007
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      Hello all,

      Just joined the group and thought it polite to say hello. I will now
      go and lurk until I have a better feel for what is going on and have
      something of use to contribute!


      ~Pete.
    • David Parke
      I ve been thinking about an FS word for to die or perish. The problem is, there are two potential candidates, both of which are dubious 1. Based on EN die,
      Message 2 of 12 , May 25, 2007
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        I've been thinking about an FS word for to die or perish. The problem
        is, there are two potential candidates, both of which are dubious
        1. Based on EN die, Scandinavian dø/dö
        2. Based on NL sterven, DE sterben

        So in a superficial analysis, both of these sets of cognates are
        present in only 2/4 of the source language branches.
        In fact sterven/sterben is the direct cognate to EN starve. So it is
        present in EN, it just means something quite different. I'm not sure if
        it's presence in EN counts in it's favour, since it has a different
        meaning and this could lead to less comprehension rather than more.

        Although die/dø/dö are not represented as VERBs in NL and DE, the PG
        *dau- root is represent in such words as NL dood and DE tot/Tod, cognate
        to EN dead/death and Scandy död/død. Words like dead/dood/tot/död/død
        represent a fossilised past participle of the PG verb *daujan, ancestor
        of die/dø/dö.

        So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some form in
        ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in meaning
        in those languages (not having potentially differing meanings such as EN
        starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be the best
        verb for this concept.
        I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This would go
        with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
      • jmcd0264
        I ve just joined so I suppose it s a bit presumptious for me to post. That said I d go with *daujan as the formative root. St(vowel)rb/v would just cause
        Message 3 of 12 , May 25, 2007
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          I've just joined so I suppose it's a bit presumptious for me to post.

          That said I'd go with *daujan as the formative root. 'St(vowel)rb/v'
          would just cause confusion and transparency is one of the goals,
          right?



          >
          > Although die/dø/dö are not represented as VERBs in NL and DE, the
          PG
          > *dau- root is represent in such words as NL dood and DE tot/Tod,
          cognate
          that something bases on *daujan would be the best
          > verb for this concept.
          > I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This
          would go
          > with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
          >
        • Jan-Willem Benjamins
          Either candidate will cause confusion: Number 2 because of its different meaning in EN, and Number 1 because NL/DE speakers might confuse it with the word for
          Message 4 of 12 , May 26, 2007
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            Either candidate will cause confusion: Number 2 because of its
            different meaning in EN, and Number 1 because NL/DE speakers might
            confuse it with the word for "to kill".
            A way around is maybe offered by NL doodgaan (go dead).

            Jan-Willem

            --- David Parke <parked@...> wrote:

            > I've been thinking about an FS word for to die or perish. The problem
            >
            > is, there are two potential candidates, both of which are dubious
            > 1. Based on EN die, Scandinavian dø/dö
            > 2. Based on NL sterven, DE sterben
            >
            > So in a superficial analysis, both of these sets of cognates are
            > present in only 2/4 of the source language branches.
            > In fact sterven/sterben is the direct cognate to EN starve. So it is
            > present in EN, it just means something quite different. I'm not sure
            > if
            > it's presence in EN counts in it's favour, since it has a different
            > meaning and this could lead to less comprehension rather than more.
            >
            > Although die/dø/dö are not represented as VERBs in NL and DE, the PG
            > *dau- root is represent in such words as NL dood and DE tot/Tod,
            > cognate
            > to EN dead/death and Scandy död/død. Words like dead/dood/tot/död/død
            >
            > represent a fossilised past participle of the PG verb *daujan,
            > ancestor
            > of die/dø/dö.
            >
            > So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some form in
            >
            > ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in
            > meaning
            > in those languages (not having potentially differing meanings such as
            > EN
            > starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be the
            > best
            > verb for this concept.
            > I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This would
            > go
            > with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
            >
            >
            > Browse the draft word lists!
            > http://www.onelist.com/files/folkspraak/
            > http://www.langmaker.com/folkspraak/volcab.html
            >
            > Browse Folkspraak-related links!
            > http://www.onelist.com/links/folkspraak/
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >




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          • Peter Collier
            Sounds reasonable to me. However, given the other forms, shouldn t the verb deude be to die ? The verb to kill would need something else, if you wanted to
            Message 5 of 12 , May 26, 2007
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              Sounds reasonable to me. However, given the other forms, shouldn't the verb
              'deude' be 'to die'? The verb 'to kill' would need something else, if you
              wanted to keep the link with 'deue' then perhaps something along the lines
              of 'to bring/send to death' or 'to cause to die'


              Pete C.

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "David Parke" <parked@...>
              To: <folkspraak@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2007 2:32 AM
              Subject: [folkspraak] Die or Starve?


              ...
              > So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some form in
              > ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in meaning
              > in those languages (not having potentially differing meanings such as EN
              > starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be the best
              > verb for this concept.
              > I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This would go
              > with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
              >
            • David Parke
              Well most of the source languages have words like deaden/doden/töten/döda meaning to kill , so FS deude, should likewise mean to kill , to make dead . I
              Message 6 of 12 , May 26, 2007
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                Well most of the source languages have words like
                "deaden/doden/töten/döda meaning "to kill", so FS deude, should likewise
                mean "to kill", "to make dead".
                I guess something like "become dead" would also work as a phrase for "to
                die". FS deud werde perhaps. "To become" itself is a problematic
                concept for FS. Try finding words for "to change into the state of
                being..." among the Germanic languages. NL worden and DE werden are
                related, as is the archaic EN worth.

                Peter Collier wrote:

                >Sounds reasonable to me. However, given the other forms, shouldn't the verb
                >'deude' be 'to die'? The verb 'to kill' would need something else, if you
                >wanted to keep the link with 'deue' then perhaps something along the lines
                >of 'to bring/send to death' or 'to cause to die'
                >
                >
                >Pete C.
                >
                >----- Original Message -----
                >From: "David Parke" <parked@...>
                >To: <folkspraak@yahoogroups.com>
                >Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2007 2:32 AM
                >Subject: [folkspraak] Die or Starve?
                >
                >
                >...
                >
                >
                >>So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some form in
                >>ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in meaning
                >>in those languages (not having potentially differing meanings such as EN
                >>starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be the best
                >>verb for this concept.
                >>I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This would go
                >>with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                >
                >No virus found in this incoming message.
                >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.7.7/816 - Release Date: 23/05/2007 3:59 p.m.
                >
                >
              • stefichjo
                I think sterve would be more problematic than deue , since there is no DE/NL word like töen / dooen (?). But, on the other hand, a FS deue would be ok
                Message 7 of 12 , May 26, 2007
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                  I think "sterve" would be more problematic than "deue", since there is
                  no DE/NL word like "töen"/"dooen" (?). But, on the other hand, a FS
                  "deue" would be ok with other FS words:

                  deue = to die
                  deued = died
                  (formerly "dod") deud = death
                  (formerly "dod") deud = dead
                  deude = to kill, cf. to deaden (?)

                  "deude" is transitive, like "fasten" and "tighten".

                  I'm using "werde" in order to express the passive, and I think it's
                  the word to use for "become" as well.

                  Dee er deud. = They are dead.
                  Dee deu. = They die.
                  Dee werd deud. = They die. / "They go dead."
                  Dee werd deuded. = They are being killed. (is this correct in EN?)

                  "sterve" would come from "to become / to be stiff" and is related with
                  "stern" and "star".

                  A word like "sterve" itself wouldn't be very usefull then, given the
                  word "deue". On the other hand, what about DE "sterblich",
                  "Sterblichkeit"? In EN they are "mortal" and "mortality", which are of
                  Romance origin.

                  "deudelig" in DA means both "mortal" and "deadly". In my opinion the
                  meaning should be narrowed to "deadly" (DE "tödlich"), if possible, FS
                  "deudlik".
                  "stervlik" would be "mortal" then. "stervlikhed" = "mortality".

                  Stephan



                  --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Well most of the source languages have words like
                  > "deaden/doden/töten/döda meaning "to kill", so FS deude, should
                  likewise
                  > mean "to kill", "to make dead".
                  > I guess something like "become dead" would also work as a phrase for
                  "to
                  > die". FS deud werde perhaps. "To become" itself is a problematic
                  > concept for FS. Try finding words for "to change into the state of
                  > being..." among the Germanic languages. NL worden and DE werden are
                  > related, as is the archaic EN worth.
                  >
                  > Peter Collier wrote:
                  >
                  > >Sounds reasonable to me. However, given the other forms, shouldn't
                  the verb
                  > >'deude' be 'to die'? The verb 'to kill' would need something else,
                  if you
                  > >wanted to keep the link with 'deue' then perhaps something along
                  the lines
                  > >of 'to bring/send to death' or 'to cause to die'
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Pete C.
                  > >
                  > >----- Original Message -----
                  > >From: "David Parke" <parked@...>
                  > >To: <folkspraak@yahoogroups.com>
                  > >Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2007 2:32 AM
                  > >Subject: [folkspraak] Die or Starve?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >...
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >>So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some form in
                  > >>ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in meaning
                  > >>in those languages (not having potentially differing meanings such
                  as EN
                  > >>starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be
                  the best
                  > >>verb for this concept.
                  > >>I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This
                  would go
                  > >>with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > >
                  > >No virus found in this incoming message.
                  > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                  > >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.7.7/816 - Release Date:
                  23/05/2007 3:59 p.m.
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                • stefichjo
                  If both words would coexist in FS, so both sterve and deue , then I would expect sterve to be less direct than deue . Another register, like euphemistic.
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 26, 2007
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                    If both words would coexist in FS, so both "sterve" and "deue", then I
                    would expect "sterve" to be less direct than "deue". Another register,
                    like euphemistic.

                    Stephan

                    --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I think "sterve" would be more problematic than "deue", since there is
                    > no DE/NL word like "töen"/"dooen" (?). But, on the other hand, a FS
                    > "deue" would be ok with other FS words:
                    >
                    > deue = to die
                    > deued = died
                    > (formerly "dod") deud = death
                    > (formerly "dod") deud = dead
                    > deude = to kill, cf. to deaden (?)
                    >
                    > "deude" is transitive, like "fasten" and "tighten".
                    >
                    > I'm using "werde" in order to express the passive, and I think it's
                    > the word to use for "become" as well.
                    >
                    > Dee er deud. = They are dead.
                    > Dee deu. = They die.
                    > Dee werd deud. = They die. / "They go dead."
                    > Dee werd deuded. = They are being killed. (is this correct in EN?)
                    >
                    > "sterve" would come from "to become / to be stiff" and is related with
                    > "stern" and "star".
                    >
                    > A word like "sterve" itself wouldn't be very usefull then, given the
                    > word "deue". On the other hand, what about DE "sterblich",
                    > "Sterblichkeit"? In EN they are "mortal" and "mortality", which are of
                    > Romance origin.
                    >
                    > "deudelig" in DA means both "mortal" and "deadly". In my opinion the
                    > meaning should be narrowed to "deadly" (DE "tödlich"), if possible, FS
                    > "deudlik".
                    > "stervlik" would be "mortal" then. "stervlikhed" = "mortality".
                    >
                    > Stephan
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Well most of the source languages have words like
                    > > "deaden/doden/töten/döda meaning "to kill", so FS deude, should
                    > likewise
                    > > mean "to kill", "to make dead".
                    > > I guess something like "become dead" would also work as a phrase for
                    > "to
                    > > die". FS deud werde perhaps. "To become" itself is a problematic
                    > > concept for FS. Try finding words for "to change into the state of
                    > > being..." among the Germanic languages. NL worden and DE werden are
                    > > related, as is the archaic EN worth.
                    > >
                    > > Peter Collier wrote:
                    > >
                    > > >Sounds reasonable to me. However, given the other forms, shouldn't
                    > the verb
                    > > >'deude' be 'to die'? The verb 'to kill' would need something else,
                    > if you
                    > > >wanted to keep the link with 'deue' then perhaps something along
                    > the lines
                    > > >of 'to bring/send to death' or 'to cause to die'
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >Pete C.
                    > > >
                    > > >----- Original Message -----
                    > > >From: "David Parke" <parked@>
                    > > >To: <folkspraak@yahoogroups.com>
                    > > >Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2007 2:32 AM
                    > > >Subject: [folkspraak] Die or Starve?
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >...
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >>So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some
                    form in
                    > > >>ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in
                    meaning
                    > > >>in those languages (not having potentially differing meanings such
                    > as EN
                    > > >>starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be
                    > the best
                    > > >>verb for this concept.
                    > > >>I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This
                    > would go
                    > > >>with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    > > >
                    > > >No virus found in this incoming message.
                    > > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                    > > >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.7.7/816 - Release Date:
                    > 23/05/2007 3:59 p.m.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • stefichjo
                    Hi Pete, Welcome to the group. / Welkomen to de grupp. Stephan
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 26, 2007
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                      Hi Pete,
                      Welcome to the group. / Welkomen to de grupp.

                      Stephan

                      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "peter21691" <petecollier@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello all,
                      >
                      > Just joined the group and thought it polite to say hello. I will now
                      > go and lurk until I have a better feel for what is going on and have
                      > something of use to contribute!
                      >
                      >
                      > ~Pete.
                      >
                    • Markus Martin
                      For what it s worth, some English dialects still retain a wider meaning for starve . e.g.: he starved from the cold . Although it is still basically limited
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jun 1 8:03 PM
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                        For what it's worth, some English dialects still retain a wider meaning for
                        'starve'. e.g.: 'he starved from the cold'. Although it is still basically
                        limited to hunger and cold only. I suppose the sense is still there
                        somewhat.

                        Having both words would not be bad and would probably be OK for English
                        speakers, but what about Scandy speakers? They do not seem to retain this
                        word at all.

                        Greets,
                        -Markus

                        2007/5/26, stefichjo <sts@...>:
                        >
                        > If both words would coexist in FS, so both "sterve" and "deue", then I
                        > would expect "sterve" to be less direct than "deue". Another register,
                        > like euphemistic.
                        >
                        > Stephan
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com <folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>,
                        > "stefichjo" <sts@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > I think "sterve" would be more problematic than "deue", since there is
                        > > no DE/NL word like "töen"/"dooen" (?). But, on the other hand, a FS
                        > > "deue" would be ok with other FS words:
                        > >
                        > > deue = to die
                        > > deued = died
                        > > (formerly "dod") deud = death
                        > > (formerly "dod") deud = dead
                        > > deude = to kill, cf. to deaden (?)
                        > >
                        > > "deude" is transitive, like "fasten" and "tighten".
                        > >
                        > > I'm using "werde" in order to express the passive, and I think it's
                        > > the word to use for "become" as well.
                        > >
                        > > Dee er deud. = They are dead.
                        > > Dee deu. = They die.
                        > > Dee werd deud. = They die. / "They go dead."
                        > > Dee werd deuded. = They are being killed. (is this correct in EN?)
                        > >
                        > > "sterve" would come from "to become / to be stiff" and is related with
                        > > "stern" and "star".
                        > >
                        > > A word like "sterve" itself wouldn't be very usefull then, given the
                        > > word "deue". On the other hand, what about DE "sterblich",
                        > > "Sterblichkeit"? In EN they are "mortal" and "mortality", which are of
                        > > Romance origin.
                        > >
                        > > "deudelig" in DA means both "mortal" and "deadly". In my opinion the
                        > > meaning should be narrowed to "deadly" (DE "tödlich"), if possible, FS
                        > > "deudlik".
                        > > "stervlik" would be "mortal" then. "stervlikhed" = "mortality".
                        > >
                        > > Stephan
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com <folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, David
                        > Parke <parked@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Well most of the source languages have words like
                        > > > "deaden/doden/töten/döda meaning "to kill", so FS deude, should
                        > > likewise
                        > > > mean "to kill", "to make dead".
                        > > > I guess something like "become dead" would also work as a phrase for
                        > > "to
                        > > > die". FS deud werde perhaps. "To become" itself is a problematic
                        > > > concept for FS. Try finding words for "to change into the state of
                        > > > being..." among the Germanic languages. NL worden and DE werden are
                        > > > related, as is the archaic EN worth.
                        > > >
                        > > > Peter Collier wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > >Sounds reasonable to me. However, given the other forms, shouldn't
                        > > the verb
                        > > > >'deude' be 'to die'? The verb 'to kill' would need something else,
                        > > if you
                        > > > >wanted to keep the link with 'deue' then perhaps something along
                        > > the lines
                        > > > >of 'to bring/send to death' or 'to cause to die'
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >Pete C.
                        > > > >
                        > > > >----- Original Message -----
                        > > > >From: "David Parke" <parked@>
                        > > > >To: <folkspraak@yahoogroups.com <folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>>
                        > > > >Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2007 2:32 AM
                        > > > >Subject: [folkspraak] Die or Starve?
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >...
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >>So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some
                        > form in
                        > > > >>ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in
                        > meaning
                        > > > >>in those languages (not having potentially differing meanings such
                        > > as EN
                        > > > >>starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be
                        > > the best
                        > > > >>verb for this concept.
                        > > > >>I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This
                        > > would go
                        > > > >>with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
                        > > > >>
                        > > > >>
                        > > > >>
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >----------------------------------------------------------
                        > > > >
                        > > > >No virus found in this incoming message.
                        > > > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        > > > >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.7.7/816 - Release Date:
                        > > 23/05/2007 3:59 p.m.
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Markus Martin
                        Welcome! I have been/am quite a professional lurker myself. Although sometimes it is hard to resist the temptation to comment on old threads, I somehow resist
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jun 1 8:05 PM
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                          Welcome! I have been/am quite a professional lurker myself. Although
                          sometimes it is hard to resist the temptation to comment on old threads, I
                          somehow resist and leave them buried. ;)

                          -Markus

                          2007/5/26, stefichjo <sts@...>:
                          >
                          > Hi Pete,
                          > Welcome to the group. / Welkomen to de grupp.
                          >
                          > Stephan
                          >
                          > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com <folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>,
                          > "peter21691" <petecollier@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hello all,
                          > >
                          > > Just joined the group and thought it polite to say hello. I will now
                          > > go and lurk until I have a better feel for what is going on and have
                          > > something of use to contribute!
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ~Pete.
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • stefichjo
                          As I said, I d prefer the word deue . So I wouldn t use sterve . Does this answer your question? Bye, Stephan ... meaning for ... basically ... this ... then
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jun 3 4:53 AM
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                            As I said, I'd prefer the word "deue". So I wouldn't use "sterve".
                            Does this answer your question?

                            Bye,
                            Stephan

                            --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "Markus Martin" <archwyrm@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > For what it's worth, some English dialects still retain a wider
                            meaning for
                            > 'starve'. e.g.: 'he starved from the cold'. Although it is still
                            basically
                            > limited to hunger and cold only. I suppose the sense is still there
                            > somewhat.
                            >
                            > Having both words would not be bad and would probably be OK for English
                            > speakers, but what about Scandy speakers? They do not seem to retain
                            this
                            > word at all.
                            >
                            > Greets,
                            > -Markus
                            >
                            > 2007/5/26, stefichjo <sts@...>:
                            > >
                            > > If both words would coexist in FS, so both "sterve" and "deue",
                            then I
                            > > would expect "sterve" to be less direct than "deue". Another register,
                            > > like euphemistic.
                            > >
                            > > Stephan
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com <folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>,
                            > > "stefichjo" <sts@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > I think "sterve" would be more problematic than "deue", since
                            there is
                            > > > no DE/NL word like "töen"/"dooen" (?). But, on the other hand, a FS
                            > > > "deue" would be ok with other FS words:
                            > > >
                            > > > deue = to die
                            > > > deued = died
                            > > > (formerly "dod") deud = death
                            > > > (formerly "dod") deud = dead
                            > > > deude = to kill, cf. to deaden (?)
                            > > >
                            > > > "deude" is transitive, like "fasten" and "tighten".
                            > > >
                            > > > I'm using "werde" in order to express the passive, and I think it's
                            > > > the word to use for "become" as well.
                            > > >
                            > > > Dee er deud. = They are dead.
                            > > > Dee deu. = They die.
                            > > > Dee werd deud. = They die. / "They go dead."
                            > > > Dee werd deuded. = They are being killed. (is this correct in EN?)
                            > > >
                            > > > "sterve" would come from "to become / to be stiff" and is
                            related with
                            > > > "stern" and "star".
                            > > >
                            > > > A word like "sterve" itself wouldn't be very usefull then, given the
                            > > > word "deue". On the other hand, what about DE "sterblich",
                            > > > "Sterblichkeit"? In EN they are "mortal" and "mortality", which
                            are of
                            > > > Romance origin.
                            > > >
                            > > > "deudelig" in DA means both "mortal" and "deadly". In my opinion the
                            > > > meaning should be narrowed to "deadly" (DE "tödlich"), if
                            possible, FS
                            > > > "deudlik".
                            > > > "stervlik" would be "mortal" then. "stervlikhed" = "mortality".
                            > > >
                            > > > Stephan
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
                            <folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, David
                            > > Parke <parked@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Well most of the source languages have words like
                            > > > > "deaden/doden/töten/döda meaning "to kill", so FS deude, should
                            > > > likewise
                            > > > > mean "to kill", "to make dead".
                            > > > > I guess something like "become dead" would also work as a
                            phrase for
                            > > > "to
                            > > > > die". FS deud werde perhaps. "To become" itself is a problematic
                            > > > > concept for FS. Try finding words for "to change into the state of
                            > > > > being..." among the Germanic languages. NL worden and DE
                            werden are
                            > > > > related, as is the archaic EN worth.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Peter Collier wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > >Sounds reasonable to me. However, given the other forms,
                            shouldn't
                            > > > the verb
                            > > > > >'deude' be 'to die'? The verb 'to kill' would need something
                            else,
                            > > > if you
                            > > > > >wanted to keep the link with 'deue' then perhaps something along
                            > > > the lines
                            > > > > >of 'to bring/send to death' or 'to cause to die'
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >Pete C.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >----- Original Message -----
                            > > > > >From: "David Parke" <parked@>
                            > > > > >To: <folkspraak@yahoogroups.com <folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>>
                            > > > > >Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2007 2:32 AM
                            > > > > >Subject: [folkspraak] Die or Starve?
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >...
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >>So I think on the basis of it representation in at least some
                            > > form in
                            > > > > >>ALL the Germanic source languages, and it being unambiguous in
                            > > meaning
                            > > > > >>in those languages (not having potentially differing
                            meanings such
                            > > > as EN
                            > > > > >>starve vs NL sterven), that something bases on *daujan would be
                            > > > the best
                            > > > > >>verb for this concept.
                            > > > > >>I would propose FS deue (as spelt in my "nyw ortografi"). This
                            > > > would go
                            > > > > >>with deud a. = dead, deud n. = death, deude v. = to kill.
                            > > > > >>
                            > > > > >>
                            > > > > >>
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >----------------------------------------------------------
                            > > > > >
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                            > > > > >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.7.7/816 - Release Date:
                            > > > 23/05/2007 3:59 p.m.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            >
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                            >
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