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Re: TravLang Folksprak - new file

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  • chamavian
    ... instead ... Wese sog od , why? An equivalent of gerne is much more widespread in the Germanic languages, wesogod is only backed by ONE source
    Message 1 of 44 , Dec 3, 2006
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      --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, David Parke <parked@...> wrote:
      >
      > Have you considered making "Please" be "Wes-so-god" and "Gern"
      instead
      > be "You're Welcome"?

      "Wese sog od", why? An equivalent of "gerne" is much more widespread
      in the Germanic languages, "wesogod" is only backed by ONE source
      language, namely Scandinavian (which we decided to consider as one,
      because you insisted).
      But, we could use both expressions to mean "please"

      Kan du helpe mi, gerne?
      and/or
      Wesogod on helpe mi.

      The latter is the Scandy way "Be so good and help me", the former
      "Can you help me, please?"



      >
      > Also what about "undergrund(ban)" as an alternative for "metro"?
      Both
      > are probably valid, but it would depend a lot on the local
      context.

      Yes, undergrund and metro are both fine.

      > There is no *Folkland, so we will be speaking FS in real cities
      with
      > there own local names for the underground/subway/metro. If we are
      > speaking FS in London, we'll probably want to use "Undergrund", in
      > Berlin "U-ban". If we are speaking FS in Amsterdam, we should
      probably
      > use "metro".

      And in Brussels, Paris, Rome, Barcelona...

      >
      > chamavian wrote:
      >
      > >I deleted the Middelsprake TravLang, because that's old news,
      > >and added a new Folksprak TravLang file.
      > >
      > >Ingmar Chamavian Roerdinkholder
      > >
      > >--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >>No man, TravLang is a website: LANGuages for TRAVelers.
      > >>They have got a lot of mini travelers language guides in all
      kind
      > >>
      > >>
      > >of
      > >
      > >
      > >>languages. I did one in Middelsprake two years ago, I'll add it
      to
      > >>the files to show you.
      > >>
      > >>But they've got dictionaries too, I guess in Afrikaans as well.
      > >>
      > >>So go check that site!
      > >>
      > >>Ingmar
      > >>
      > >>--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "eugeniusz.slowik"
      > >><eugeniusz.slowik@> wrote:
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>>TravLang is Afrikaans? Roma and Sintis are a traveling nation
      > >>>
      > >>>chamavian schrieb:
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>>Het jy al op TravLang gesoek?
      > >>>>
      > >>>>--- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com
      > >>>><mailto:folkspraak%40yahoogroups.com>, "eugeniusz.slowik"
      > >>>><eugeniusz.slowik@> wrote:
      > >>>>
      > >>>>
      > >>>>>Baie mense assosieer Afrikaans nog altyd met Apartheid, maar
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >>dat is
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>>>>tog oor en virby.
      > >>>>>===
      > >>>>>Hierdie mense is baie dom! Ek was en is teen Apartheit. So
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >is
      > >
      > >
      > >>ek
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>>>>ook teen
      > >>>>>die nuut Apartheit van die Israelse regering. Die Taal ken
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >nie
      > >
      > >
      > >>ì´n
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>>>>oewer nie!! ( Die Sprache kennt keine Grenzen nicht).
      > >>>>>===
      > >>>>>Ja, en wat denk jy van die apartheid teen die Roma en Sinti
      > >>>>>(sigeuners) in Oos-Europa?
      > >>>>>---
      > >>>>>Daar is die apartheid baie ekstreem. Ek dink dat die
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >>diskriminasie
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>>>>van die Roma ´n mens kan ook in die taal vind. Daarom ek nie
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>gebruik die
      > >>>>
      > >>>>
      > >>>>>woord
      > >>>>>sigeuner of cygan (pl) nie.
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>Skryf gerus
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>Eugene
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>PS: Ek het en groote problem. My woordeboek is baie klein.
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >Ek
      > >
      > >
      > >>kyk
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>>>´n
      > >>>>
      > >>>>
      > >>>>>goeie woordeboek online. Kan Jy my help?
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>
      > >>>>
      > >>>>
      > >>>
      > >>>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >------------------------------------------------------------------
      ------
      > >
      > >No virus found in this incoming message.
      > >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
      > >Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.4/563 - Release Date:
      2/12/2006
      > >
      > >
      >
    • chamavian
      ... swans ... tail. ... stjært ... start, ... be ... extremity ... would ... tail, ... FS Stert is fine too for tail, and we can use swans for penis, like
      Message 44 of 44 , Dec 9, 2006
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        --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "David Parke" <parked@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In folkspraak@yahoogroups.com, "chamavian" <roerd096@> wrote:
        >
        > > SWANS: G Schwanz, NL staart, SW Svans
        >
        > Unfortunately DE "Schwanz" and SV/DA svans seem to be the only
        > cognates to this. There is no NL *zwans or EN *swance. Maybe FS
        swans
        > could be a slang word for penis instead of the primary meaning for
        tail.
        > I think something based on NL staart, SV stjärt, NO stjert, DA
        stjært
        > would be just as valid a word. Also there is DE Sterz, and EN
        start,
        > but they are archaic -- especially the EN word. DE Sterz, seems to
        be
        > current enough to be in my Deutsch-Interlingua Wörterbuch. And in
        > Websters Online German-English.
        > Leo translates Sterz as "parson's nose". This is the fatty
        extremity
        > of a fowl's rump. So I wonder how many average German-speakers
        would
        > know "Sterz". If it is still reasonably recognisable, then I think
        > "stert" would make a better FS word for EN tail.
        > To make matters more cloudy, Swedish has "tagel", cognate to EN
        tail,
        > but it is used only of horses hair (on a horse tail). My Short OED
        > states that DE has Zagel, but it is only dialectal usage.

        FS "Stert" is fine too for tail, and we can use "swans" for penis,
        like in German.

        Btw how does a German know whether one is talking about a horse's
        tail or a horse's penis? Are both called "Pferdeschwanz"?

        Btw 2: I never knew "tail" was a Germanic word from *tagel etc, I've
        always thought it was from French taille

        Champignon




        >
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