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Re: [flapdoodle_dinghy] Re: Building a 2 or 3 section flapdoodle

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  • John
    Ken, I m thinking of a 3 section FD. 5.5 fore, 6 mid and 5.5 stern. Although a lot more costly than ply, I would like to use 2mm aluminium sheeting.for the
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2010
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      Ken,
       
      I'm thinking of a 3 section FD. 5.5' fore, 6' mid and 5.5' stern. Although a lot more costly than ply, I would like to use 2mm aluminium sheeting.for the hull and then use ply for the rest. The stern section being used as a detachable mini Flapdoodle with electric motor & oars.
       
      I've ordered a CAD package and will try out some designs of what I wish to make.
       
      My aim is to have a folding 17' cabin cruiser, that can be transported by car (internal or on roof rack). With a few trips to the car and back, each section is then assembled and placed in the canal and locked together.The ability to launch and retrieve the boat, anywere along the canal with access and with not much more effort than a standard FD, is appealling. The cost saving on Waterway license fees in one year, would nearly pay for all of the extra materials etc.
       
      It is still in the idea stage and a lot of thought in the design needs to be addressed.
       
      An elevating cabin, like on a campervan maybe, to give some headroom.
       
      Not sure about the sleeping accommodation (maybe a hammock :).
       
      John
      John
      John    
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 3:48 AM
      Subject: [flapdoodle_dinghy] Re: Building a 2 or 3 section flapdoodle

       

      First I should point out that several customers had a berth (simply a deep vertical slot the hull can be droped into) built into their larger boat (small yacht?). The folded Flapdoodle is dropped into that well and a cover secured over it.

      Another fellow can assemble the flapdoodle in the cabin and bring it on deck.

      But, okay. lets look at a Flapdoodle that is in sections, at least as a design exercise and see where it takes us.

      1. What would be the purpose of the dinghy? Only for getting groceries and beer from shore? Duty as hauling the anchor out to be set or retrieved?

      2. Would some sort of folding or pop-up cabin be needed for some overnight camping?

      3. Some other service, perhaps on an oil rig, or a utility vehicle to maintain the outer parts of the yacht?

      I would want to make a section long enough to sleep in if the answer is 3 to avoid having to lay across the PVC bulkhead. Say 6.5 feet. Where we decide to make the section breaks will determine its usefulness when the Flapdoodle switches roles.

      I think I made my earlier response too soon when I realized the beam would be almost 8 feet.

      Then late on night I went back to the Calico boat idea (search the post for the like if you are interested). It was 12 feet long and there is a photo of me holding it at arms length by two fingers.

      So... Maybe a "Doodle Light" mostly composed of 1/2" pink insulation foam glued with acrylic caulk between square hardwood "sticks". Then Dacron line or perhaps Kevlar this time is laced between cells. Later the hull (or hull sections) get covered with Dacron and shrink fit before impregnating with glue. The Calico was close to that except PVC pipe was used instead of wood sticks.

      If done right, it will be quite strong and light. Plus have the ability to fold.

      Try making a single cell of pink foam with laminated Dacron, then test it to destruction if you wish to see how strong it is. It is pretty impressive.

      I need feedback. Does the idea sound attractive? What would be the desired beam and length? Estimated maximum load capacity?

      Bill

      >
      > John and Bill,
      >
      > I would be interested in a sectioned Flapdoodle design. I am currently completing a rebuild of my 25' tri and am looking for portable dinghy. Although the Flapdoodle would work, it still would take up more deck space then I like. Keep us posted.
      >
      > Ken H.

    • flapdoodle_dinghy
      My first concern would be a durable bond between the aluminum and the hinge material. I would recommend experimenting with that as a beginning. Should not cost
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 2, 2010
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        My first concern would be a durable bond between the aluminum and the hinge material. I would recommend experimenting with that as a beginning. Should not cost much if anything at all.

        Predecessors to the FD were 9' 11" because the license in New Mexico is for boats 10 feet or more.

        There is a fee for a day of boating on a local small lake. The lady issuing the permits asked what kind of boat. I said sailboat. She craned her head looking at the pickup and shrugged since there was no boat visible.

        Bill

        --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "John" <j.england01@...> wrote:
        >
        > Ken,
        >
        > I'm thinking of a 3 section FD. 5.5' fore, 6' mid and 5.5' stern. Although a lot more costly than ply, I would like to use 2mm aluminium sheeting.for the hull and then use ply for the rest. The stern section being used as a detachable mini Flapdoodle with electric motor & oars.
        >
        > I've ordered a CAD package and will try out some designs of what I wish to make.
        >
        > My aim is to have a folding 17' cabin cruiser, that can be transported by car (internal or on roof rack). With a few trips to the car and back, each section is then assembled and placed in the canal and locked together.The ability to launch and retrieve the boat, anywere along the canal with access and with not much more effort than a standard FD, is appealling. The cost saving on Waterway license fees in one year, would nearly pay for all of the extra materials etc.
        >
        > It is still in the idea stage and a lot of thought in the design needs to be addressed.
        >
        > An elevating cabin, like on a campervan maybe, to give some headroom.
        >
        > Not sure about the sleeping accommodation (maybe a hammock :).
        >
        > John
      • John
        Bill, I ll experiment with the bonding of aluminium and pvc. If no joy, then its back to ply. I m using two programs to design the hull. Both free to download.
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 3, 2010
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          Bill,
          I'll experiment with the bonding of aluminium and pvc. If no joy, then its back to ply.
           
          I'm using two programs to design the hull. Both free to download. The first is Hulls from www.carlsondesign.com and the second is FREE!ship vers 3.1 from www.freeship.org . The design can then be loaded into a suitable CAD program to add the extras.
           
          I've not used CAD software before, so this in itself is a new learning curve.
           
          I've been thinking about the length of the 3 sections. I would like to have the stern section as a detachable mini FD maybe 6 feet. The centre section 7 feet and the fore section 4 feet.
           
          John
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, April 02, 2010 9:18 PM
          Subject: [flapdoodle_dinghy] Re: Building a 2 or 3 section flapdoodle

           

          My first concern would be a durable bond between the aluminum and the hinge material. I would recommend experimenting with that as a beginning. Should not cost much if anything at all.

          Predecessors to the FD were 9' 11" because the license in New Mexico is for boats 10 feet or more.

          There is a fee for a day of boating on a local small lake. The lady issuing the permits asked what kind of boat. I said sailboat. She craned her head looking at the pickup and shrugged since there was no boat visible.

          Bill

          --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@ yahoogroups. com, "John" <j.england01@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > Ken,
          >
          > I'm thinking of a 3 section FD. 5.5' fore, 6' mid and 5.5' stern. Although a lot more costly than ply, I would like to use 2mm aluminium sheeting.for the hull and then use ply for the rest. The stern section being used as a detachable mini Flapdoodle with electric motor & oars.
          >
          > I've ordered a CAD package and will try out some designs of what I wish to make.
          >
          > My aim is to have a folding 17' cabin cruiser, that can be transported by car (internal or on roof rack). With a few trips to the car and back, each section is then assembled and placed in the canal and locked together.The ability to launch and retrieve the boat, anywere along the canal with access and with not much more effort than a standard FD, is appealling. The cost saving on Waterway license fees in one year, would nearly pay for all of the extra materials etc.
          >
          > It is still in the idea stage and a lot of thought in the design needs to be addressed.
          >
          > An elevating cabin, like on a campervan maybe, to give some headroom.
          >
          > Not sure about the sleeping accommodation (maybe a hammock :).
          >
          > John

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