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construction materiels

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  • augusthahn@sbcglobal.net
    I have just purchased a Foldlite kayak thats made from coroplast and poly carbon injection molded ribs I was wondering if the coroplast would work for a boat
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2009
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      I have just purchased a Foldlite kayak thats made from coroplast and poly carbon injection molded ribs I was wondering if the coroplast would work for a boat like the FlapDoddle comes in 10mm whice is plenty thick and one could use glass or carbon rods inserted into the spaces on the board for extra rienforcements.Just some new ideas
    • Bill
      Hi August. Coroplast has been discussed in here. See message 376 to 441. I think to biggest setback would be gluing problems mentioned by Dave. There are
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2009
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        Hi August.
        Coroplast has been discussed in here. See message 376 to 441.

        I think to biggest setback would be gluing problems mentioned by Dave.

        There are adhesives, but require special and expensive tools. A factory such as Foldalite can do that, but not me.

        Bill





        --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "augusthahn@..." <augusthahn@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have just purchased a Foldlite kayak thats made from coroplast and poly carbon injection molded ribs I was wondering if the coroplast would work for a boat like the FlapDoddle comes in 10mm whice is plenty thick and one could use glass or carbon rods inserted into the spaces on the board for extra rienforcements.Just some new ideas
        >
      • brad.dudenhoffer
        I havn t build a boat out of it but I have build numerous radio control airplanes using coroplast. The trick is to use a small propane torch (like you would
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 4, 2009
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          I havn't build a boat out of it but I have build numerous radio control airplanes using coroplast. The trick is to use a small propane torch (like you would use for sweating copper pipes) to burn off the surcafe oils on the plastic. You want to pass the flame as slowly as possible over the plastic without melting/burning it. After that, use some cyanoacrylate (super glue) to bond the two surfaces together. It doesn't take much glue to make a good strong joint. I usually start with thick (slow-cure) to make the bond so I have enough time to move things around if necessary and then fill in any parts I missed with thin (fast-cure) which will wick into the joint. The bond is strong enough that I can't pull it apart without tearing the plastic.
        • Bill
          Thanks Brad, that is good to know. Any idea how your technique would work bonding other materials to it such as Dacron? I am still mulling over the idea of
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 4, 2009
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            Thanks Brad, that is good to know. Any idea how your technique would work bonding other materials to it such as Dacron?

            I am still mulling over the idea of building a Velomobile sort of machine. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velomobile

            The bike I built is now a tribrid (gas/electric/pedal) and sort of a test bed for a hybrid 3 wheel drive Velo or *MAYBE* amphibious.
            http://flapdoodle.250free.com/tribrid.html
            I just can't let go of the idea.

            It is well within the weight and price range I had hoped for at 114# and $590. There are still a few bugs to iron out, but so far I am delighted.

            Coroplast would be my choice of materials if I could make it work either as a velo or amphib. (no, it won't fold, but collapsible, detachable pontoons remain as an option) Second option would be construction similar to the Dacron geodesic boats.
            http://gaboats.com/

            By the way, I found 100% Dacron bed sheets at WalMart for $3. By far the cheapest I have found anywhere. I am sleeping on them and so far they seem good.

            Bill


            --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "brad.dudenhoffer" <brad.dudenhoffer@...> wrote:
            >
            > I havn't build a boat out of it but I have build numerous radio control airplanes using coroplast. The trick is to use a small propane torch (like you would use for sweating copper pipes) to burn off the surcafe oils on the plastic. You want to pass the flame as slowly as possible over the plastic without melting/burning it. After that, use some cyanoacrylate (super glue) to bond the two surfaces together. It doesn't take much glue to make a good strong joint. I usually start with thick (slow-cure) to make the bond so I have enough time to move things around if necessary and then fill in any parts I missed with thin (fast-cure) which will wick into the joint. The bond is strong enough that I can't pull it apart without tearing the plastic.
            >
          • AUGUST HAHN
            could you use a solvent or sandpaper ? ________________________________ From: brad.dudenhoffer To:
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 5, 2009
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              could you use a solvent or sandpaper ?


              From: brad.dudenhoffer <brad.dudenhoffer@...>
              To: flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2009 1:33:51 PM
              Subject: [flapdoodle_dinghy] Re: construction materiels

              I havn't build a boat out of it but I have build numerous radio control airplanes using coroplast. The trick is to use a small propane torch (like you would use for sweating copper pipes) to burn off the surcafe oils on the plastic. You want to pass the flame as slowly as possible over the plastic without melting/burning it. After that, use some cyanoacrylate (super glue) to bond the two surfaces together. It doesn't take much glue to make a good strong joint. I usually start with thick (slow-cure) to make the bond so I have enough time to move things around if necessary and then fill in any parts I missed with thin (fast-cure) which will wick into the joint. The bond is strong enough that I can't pull it apart without tearing the plastic.

            • brad.dudenhoffer
              Sandpaper tends to rub the oil around. If you sand it enough to remove the oil you end up removing too much plastic. There probably is a solvent that would
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 5, 2009
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                Sandpaper tends to rub the oil around. If you sand it enough to remove the oil you end up removing too much plastic. There probably is a solvent that would work but I would worry about disolving the plastic. The flame really isn't hard to do. If you practice on a couple of scraps you won't have any problem with it. Plus it's an excuse to play with fire :)

                --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, AUGUST HAHN <augusthahn@...> wrote:
                >
                > could you use a solvent or sandpaper ?
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