Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The Great Hinge Experiment Revisited

Expand Messages
  • John England
    Hi Bill, Have you tried a spiral hinge, like that on a spiral bound notebook? I ve got a lot of 30 amp insulated copper wire that after stripping might be good
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 6, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Bill,
      Have you tried a spiral hinge, like that on a spiral bound notebook?
      I've got a lot of 30 amp insulated copper wire that after stripping might be good enough. Anyone else tried this sort of hinge?

      Regards
      John

      --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <flapdoodle_dinghy@...> wrote:
      >
      > Sorry, I thought I had expressed my opinion on cable ties. They were a
      > disaster on a previous (non-folding) boat, and I swore I would never
      > again consider them for a place that was inaccessible when the boat
      > was completed or in a situation that was critical for safety reasons.
      >
      > Yes I had considered what potential Flapdoodle builders would say when
      > they looked at the plans for the first time and saw the 1,000 holes. I
      > would personally be more horrified at the prospect of having to stitch
      > them. Because of back problems, one day stitching would equal three
      > days in bed recovering.
      >
      > I hope I have not given the impression I am recommending the figure 8
      > stitches. The sections of piano hinge is still by far the best
      > solution. But some expressed concern over them, and wanted an
      > alternative. This group is the place bounce ideas about.
      >
      > BTW, my first folder was not a dinghy and used canvas as a hinge.
      > Plans would never be offered for the Flapdoodle if that was the only
      > option. It was far from satisfactory.
      >
      > The continuous hinge 8 feet long still has the potential problem I
      > mentioned... the keel is a straight edge and the bottom panel is
      > curved. A little slip occurs when the boat is opened because the
      > length changes slightly. The piano hinges *sections* handle this
      > beautifully. Since I have never used the long plastic ones you
      > mentioned I can not advise, but I have doubts that it would manage the
      > slip issue.
      >
      > My experiments will continue on alternate hinges in hopes of
      > satisfying those who did not like the metal piano hinges. Next trip to
      > town will include a roll of Gorilla Tape on the shopping list. Who
      > knows? Maybe it will make life easier for someone if it lives up to
      > its claims.
      >
      > I am working well into the nights on other improvements. Last night
      > the first mate was horrified when she saw me bounce the dingy about
      > violently to demonstrate the improvements. I would not have been
      > nearly so rough on a stitch and glue boat for fear it would be a pile
      > of kindling, but the Doodle did not mind it a bit.
      >
      > The Flapdoodle may be a contender for the World's most versatile boat
      > someday.
      >
      > Bill
      >
    • Bill
      Hi John. No I have not tried wire, but I used wire to temporarily hold the panels together while stitching them. The way the wire dug into the wood was
      Message 2 of 23 , Mar 6, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi John.

        No I have not tried wire, but I used wire to temporarily hold the panels together while stitching them. The way the wire dug into the wood was alarming.

        But you could try a few test pieces and see what happens.

        Bill

        --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "John England" <j.england01@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Bill,
        > Have you tried a spiral hinge, like that on a spiral bound notebook?
        > I've got a lot of 30 amp insulated copper wire that after stripping might be good enough. Anyone else tried this sort of hinge?
        >
        > Regards
        > John
      • amstraub2
        Hi John, I think that the major advantage with the figure 8 hinge (as specified in the plans) is that, as the hinge is flexed, there is no sliding of the
        Message 3 of 23 , Mar 6, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi John,

          I think that the major advantage with the "figure 8" hinge (as specified in the plans) is that, as the hinge is flexed, there is no "sliding" of the thread over the wood, only "wrapping/unwraping". I believe that a spiral-type wire hinge would "saw" it's way through the wood in short order. However, I could be totally wrong and would really like to see the results of any experiments that you conduct.

          Al, in Ann Arbor

          --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <flap@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi John.
          >
          > No I have not tried wire, but I used wire to temporarily hold the panels together while stitching them. The way the wire dug into the wood was alarming.
          >
          > But you could try a few test pieces and see what happens.
          >
          > Bill
          >
          > --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "John England" <j.england01@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi Bill,
          > > Have you tried a spiral hinge, like that on a spiral bound notebook?
          > > I've got a lot of 30 amp insulated copper wire that after stripping might be good enough. Anyone else tried this sort of hinge?
          > >
          > > Regards
          > > John
          >
        • John England
          Hi Al, The spiral wound wire idea was a (toh) top of the head thinking. Looking at the notebook that gave me the idea, I can now see that the holes would need
          Message 4 of 23 , Mar 7, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Al,

            The spiral wound wire idea was a (toh) top of the head thinking. Looking at the notebook that gave me the idea, I can now see that the holes would need to be larger and spaced closer together. Not such a good idea. I think I will try the fig 8 mono line stitch for now. I am studying the plans and hope to start on the boat by the end of the month.

            John in UK

            --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "amstraub2" <amstraub2@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi John,
            >
            > I think that the major advantage with the "figure 8" hinge (as specified in the plans) is that, as the hinge is flexed, there is no "sliding" of the thread over the wood, only "wrapping/unwraping". I believe that a spiral-type wire hinge would "saw" it's way through the wood in short order. However, I could be totally wrong and would really like to see the results of any experiments that you conduct.
            >
            > Al, in Ann Arbor
            >
            > --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <flap@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi John.
            > >
            > > No I have not tried wire, but I used wire to temporarily hold the panels together while stitching them. The way the wire dug into the wood was alarming.
            > >
            > > But you could try a few test pieces and see what happens.
            > >
            > > Bill
            > >
            > > --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "John England" <j.england01@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hi Bill,
            > > > Have you tried a spiral hinge, like that on a spiral bound notebook?
            > > > I've got a lot of 30 amp insulated copper wire that after stripping might be good enough. Anyone else tried this sort of hinge?
            > > >
            > > > Regards
            > > > John
            > >
            >
          • Bill
            Quite alright. That s how we learn new techniques. And welcome to the group. Bill
            Message 5 of 23 , Mar 7, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Quite alright. That's how we learn new techniques.
              And welcome to the group.

              Bill

              --- In flapdoodle_dinghy@yahoogroups.com, "John England" <j.england01@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Al,
              >
              > The spiral wound wire idea was a (toh) top of the head thinking. Looking at the notebook that gave me the idea, I can now see that the holes would need to be larger and spaced closer together. Not such a good idea. I think I will try the fig 8 mono line stitch for now. I am studying the plans and hope to start on the boat by the end of the month.
              >
              > John in UK
              >
            • witt_saw
              Hi John, I used the braided fishing line, 65 lb. test, it s about the same diameter as 30 lb. mono line and much more flexable. I doubled back the stitches for
              Message 6 of 23 , Mar 8, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi John,
                I used the braided fishing line, 65 lb. test, it's about the same diameter as 30 lb. mono line and much more flexable. I doubled back the stitches for the last 6" at the end of each hinge. That's where the most stress is on my hull. The braided line lies flat and is easier to work with. Photos are posted under Fatdoodle and there are some closeups of the stitching.
                Good luck with your building project.
                Regards,
                Steve Witter
                Branford, CT

                Hi Al,
                The spiral wound wire idea was a (toh) top of the head thinking. Looking at the notebook that gave me the idea, I can now see that the holes would need to be larger and spaced closer together. Not such a good idea. I think I will try the fig 8 mono line stitch for now. I am studying the plans and hope to start on the boat by the end of the month.

                John in UK
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.