Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Some Things I Learned at RootsTech 2012

Expand Messages
  • Donald R. Snow
    SOME THINGS I LEARNED AT ROOTSTECH 2012 2-4 Feb 2012, Salt Palace, Salt Lake City, Utah ©2012 by Donald R. Snow These are not in any particular order and are
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 7, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      SOME THINGS I LEARNED AT ROOTSTECH 2012
      2-4 Feb 2012, Salt Palace, Salt Lake City, Utah
      ©2012 by Donald R. Snow

      These are not in any particular order and are only a few of the things I
      learned and, undoubtedly, other people learned many other things. This
      is posted at http://uvtagg.org/classes/dons/dons-classes.html and may
      be used for any non-profit purpose, newsletter, etc., but please let me
      know if you do use it. Thanks. snowd@... .

      1. The entire RootsTech 2012 syllabus and program schedule is online
      at http://www.rootstech.org for anyone to look and/or download
      regardless of whether they attended the meeting or not. Those were
      posted 2 or 3 weeks before the meeting so attendees could look at and
      print off what they wanted, but it has also been available to everyone.
      I think it's a very helpful thing for family history everywhere.

      2. The keynote presentations and classes that were in the main
      lecture room all day long each day, Thursday through Saturday, were
      streamed live on the website and were recorded. They are now posted
      there for anyone to watch. Jay Verkler's keynote address on the first
      day about what's in the future for family history and technology was
      really spectacular.

      3. RootsTech 2013 will be 21-23 Mar 2013, so it will be 6 weeks later
      in the year than this year's meeting.

      4. Ancestry has several new things on their website, including some
      new search techniques. On their census images they now have a way to
      put a colored background behind the entire family you want and a
      different color on the particular line of that family. With that it is
      much easier to follow the entire census form across the page. They have
      lots of other new stuff too. See their notes.

      5. Dallan Quass of http://www.werelate.org has posted on his
      website a table of name variants, 200,000 for sunames and 70,000 for
      given names. These help greatly in genealogy searching. He has already
      put it into operation on WeRelate and is asking people to fine-tune the
      list as they do searches, if they see names that shouldn't be in the
      list or know of others that should be. Anyone can download the table to
      use themselves. I think Dallan also has a place variant list, but I
      didn't attend that talk.

      6. Someone mentioned that all the talks were being recorded and would
      be posted along with the PowerPoint slides synchronized, but I didn't
      hear that officially.

      7. The class on Evernote discussed how it can be used for personal
      and family history uses and that it has some really helpful stuff.
      Also, there are add-ons for browsers that are helpful for Evernote and
      many things, e.g. "Clarify" is an add-on that makes text from websites
      show up with better formatting so it is easier to read and copy and
      paste. Do Google searches for Clarify for the browser you use.

      8. Barbara Renick's 19 pages of notes for her SnagIt workshop are
      posted and have lots of helpful information. SnagIt is a very useful,
      but commercial, screen and video capture program.

      9. Fold3 http://www.fold3.com says they have the largest collection
      of U.S. military records on the web. Much of it can be searched and
      used for free. They had a half-price deal on their subscriptions for
      RootsTech attendees, but also said that since Ancestry now owns them,
      that anyone with an Ancestry subscription can get the half-price
      subscription to Fold3 at anytime. On Fold3 there are Memorial pages set
      up already for millions of people, e.g. already for everyone in the
      Social Security Death Index, and you can set up others for free. You
      can then add data, images, stories, etc., and link to the memorial page
      from anywhere else, including from (new) FamilySearch. Eventually,
      FamilySearch will allow us to upload images, etc., but not yet, so this
      makes a good way to post images and data now and put the link into nFS.

      10. There is a beta test of (new) FamilySearch going on right now to
      add sources and active links into nFS, but you have to be invited.

      11. Many of you are aware of the free 9-generation pedigree fan
      chart that Matt Misbach's TreeSeek company is providing with your
      FamilySearch data - go to http://www.createfan.com and log in with
      your LDS account to generate it. You can view it and save off the pdf
      or have it printed in various ways. Matt told me that you can do free
      9-generation fan charts starting with other PID's by going to his
      http://www.treesee.com , using your LDS account, and entering the
      starting PID in the box.

      12. Darrin Lythgoe has just released version 9 of "The Next
      Generation" software - http://www.tngsitebuilding.com . It is a
      commercial program that makes web pages with your genealogy data for
      posting online, but the web pages can also just be run on your own
      computer to show your data in various ways. It requires the free PHP
      which can be installed on your computer using a free download from
      http://www.wampserver.com/en/ .

      13. The Family History Library has a project of scanning FH books
      that you bring in. See details on http://books.familysearch.org/ and
      there are already over 40,000 FH books scanned and online there from the
      FHL, BYU Harold B. Lee Library, Allen County Public Library, Houston
      Public Library, and others. To have a book scanned you must hold the
      copyright and give them permission or else it must be out of copyright
      so it can be posted online. You take the book to the basement of the
      FHL and they will have it scanned for you in a couple of hours. This is
      a major resource of FH data.

      14. MarkLogic http://www.marklogic.com has a program that organizes
      and searches large databases that are not in uniform format. It allows
      many different types of searches and updates the searches as new data is
      added to the database. It is mainly for very large databases that
      companies want to be able to search. The software is free and the
      program is free to use, if the database is smaller than 40 gigs. I
      haven't tried it yet, but it may be just what I need for the text file
      database I have made of the personal letter collection of Erastus Snow
      and his family. We have about 300 family letters and that many more
      official and Church letters. The transcribed personal letter collection
      alone is several hundred single-spaced typed pages with combined file
      size of several gigs. I am anxious to learn how to use the program to
      see if it is a good search tool for such a database. It has proximity
      and other types of searches.

      15. The website http://www.geni.com/ claims to be the world's
      largest family tree with 61 million profiles (names). They have a basic
      plan that is free and two higher commercial levels which have more
      features. Some of their information is free and they have projects that
      people are posting such as about the Mormon Battalion, the Nauvoo
      Legion, Early Mormon Pioneers, early Mormon leaders, and many others.
      You can upload GEDCOM's, photos, and documents, and they have a facial
      recognition program that when you identify an ancestor in a photo it
      searches the rest of your photos to see if it can find other photos with
      that person. There is a way that libraries and organizations can sign
      up so their members can use the Geni Public Access program free - see
      http://www.geni.com/corp/geni-public-access-program/ - but I don't know
      what that includes.

      16. Family history consultants could attend certain classes for free
      and those were all recorded and will be posted online at the Consultants
      Training website. The schedule of FH Consultant talks is at
      http://rootstech.org/trainingschedule and I think the Consultant website
      where the notes and videos will be posted is
      https://www.familysearch.org/consultant/ .

      17. There was lots of information at the conference on mobile apps
      for FH with entire classes on apps for iPads, etc.

      18. FamilySearch is looking for lots of volunteers to index the 1940
      U.S. Census as soon as it is released on 2 Apr 2012. They estimate that
      it will take several months to do the indexing and are encouraging
      people to sign up at https://familysearch.org/1940Census . There are
      already sites that help you find the 1940 Enumeration District, if you
      know the address, so you can find your people before the index is
      complete. One of the talks was by Steve Morse who has written about 200
      "One-Step" programs to search various websites or do various genealogy
      tasks, one of which is how to find the 1940 Census Enumeration Districts
      - see http://stevemorse.org/ .

      I learned lots more than this, but this is a start. It was a good
      conference with something for everyone and we appreciate FamilySearch,
      BYU, and all the other sponsors spending their time, money, and efforts
      for us.

      Don Snow

      --
      Dr. Donald R. Snow, Retired Professor of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah - snowd@...
    • Bill Buchanan
      Don, This is good useful information, but I would like to correct a URL. 11. Many of you are aware of the free 9-generation pedigree fan chart that Matt
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 7, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Don,
         
        This is good useful information, but I would like to correct a URL.
         
        "11. Many of you are aware of the free 9-generation pedigree fan
        chart that Matt Misbach's TreeSeek company is providing with your
        FamilySearch data - go to http://www.createfan.com and log in with
        your LDS account to generate it. You can view it and save off the pdf
        or have it printed in various ways. Matt told me that you can do free
        9-generation fan charts starting with other PID's by going to his
        http://www.treesee.com , using your LDS account, and entering the
        starting PID in the box."
        The correct URL is http://www.treeseek.com 
        Just out of curiosity I looked up George Washington's PID in nFS, and then printed a 9-generation fan chart for him at http://www.treeseek.com by using that PID.
         
        Now, if we could convince Matt to add a free 4 generation pedigree chart for newly-called missionaries, that would be another great service! All new missionaries are expected to bring a 4-generation pedigree chart to their MTC, but unless the family has their genealogy in their desktop software this is difficult to do. Pedigrees printed directly from nFS have only the names with no dates or places.
         
         
        Bill Buchanan
         
        On Tue, Feb 7, 2012 at 2:33 AM, Donald R. Snow <snowd@...> wrote:
         

        SOME THINGS I LEARNED AT ROOTSTECH 2012
        2-4 Feb 2012, Salt Palace, Salt Lake City, Utah
        ©2012 by Donald R. Snow

        These are not in any particular order and are only a few of the things I
        learned and, undoubtedly, other people learned many other things. This
        is posted at http://uvtagg.org/classes/dons/dons-classes.html and may
        be used for any non-profit purpose, newsletter, etc., but please let me
        know if you do use it. Thanks. snowd@... .

        1. The entire RootsTech 2012 syllabus and program schedule is online
        at http://www.rootstech.org for anyone to look and/or download
        regardless of whether they attended the meeting or not. Those were
        posted 2 or 3 weeks before the meeting so attendees could look at and
        print off what they wanted, but it has also been available to everyone.
        I think it's a very helpful thing for family history everywhere.

        2. The keynote presentations and classes that were in the main
        lecture room all day long each day, Thursday through Saturday, were
        streamed live on the website and were recorded. They are now posted
        there for anyone to watch. Jay Verkler's keynote address on the first
        day about what's in the future for family history and technology was
        really spectacular.

        3. RootsTech 2013 will be 21-23 Mar 2013, so it will be 6 weeks later
        in the year than this year's meeting.

        4. Ancestry has several new things on their website, including some
        new search techniques. On their census images they now have a way to
        put a colored background behind the entire family you want and a
        different color on the particular line of that family. With that it is
        much easier to follow the entire census form across the page. They have
        lots of other new stuff too. See their notes.

        5. Dallan Quass of http://www.werelate.org has posted on his
        website a table of name variants, 200,000 for sunames and 70,000 for
        given names. These help greatly in genealogy searching. He has already
        put it into operation on WeRelate and is asking people to fine-tune the
        list as they do searches, if they see names that shouldn't be in the
        list or know of others that should be. Anyone can download the table to
        use themselves. I think Dallan also has a place variant list, but I
        didn't attend that talk.

        6. Someone mentioned that all the talks were being recorded and would
        be posted along with the PowerPoint slides synchronized, but I didn't
        hear that officially.

        7. The class on Evernote discussed how it can be used for personal
        and family history uses and that it has some really helpful stuff.
        Also, there are add-ons for browsers that are helpful for Evernote and
        many things, e.g. "Clarify" is an add-on that makes text from websites
        show up with better formatting so it is easier to read and copy and
        paste. Do Google searches for Clarify for the browser you use.

        8. Barbara Renick's 19 pages of notes for her SnagIt workshop are
        posted and have lots of helpful information. SnagIt is a very useful,
        but commercial, screen and video capture program.

        9. Fold3 http://www.fold3.com says they have the largest collection
        of U.S. military records on the web. Much of it can be searched and
        used for free. They had a half-price deal on their subscriptions for
        RootsTech attendees, but also said that since Ancestry now owns them,
        that anyone with an Ancestry subscription can get the half-price
        subscription to Fold3 at anytime. On Fold3 there are Memorial pages set
        up already for millions of people, e.g. already for everyone in the
        Social Security Death Index, and you can set up others for free. You
        can then add data, images, stories, etc., and link to the memorial page
        from anywhere else, including from (new) FamilySearch. Eventually,
        FamilySearch will allow us to upload images, etc., but not yet, so this
        makes a good way to post images and data now and put the link into nFS.

        10. There is a beta test of (new) FamilySearch going on right now to
        add sources and active links into nFS, but you have to be invited.

        11. Many of you are aware of the free 9-generation pedigree fan
        chart that Matt Misbach's TreeSeek company is providing with your
        FamilySearch data - go to http://www.createfan.com and log in with
        your LDS account to generate it. You can view it and save off the pdf
        or have it printed in various ways. Matt told me that you can do free
        9-generation fan charts starting with other PID's by going to his
        http://www.treesee.com , using your LDS account, and entering the
        starting PID in the box.

        12. Darrin Lythgoe has just released version 9 of "The Next
        Generation" software - http://www.tngsitebuilding.com . It is a
        commercial program that makes web pages with your genealogy data for
        posting online, but the web pages can also just be run on your own
        computer to show your data in various ways. It requires the free PHP
        which can be installed on your computer using a free download from
        http://www.wampserver.com/en/ .

        13. The Family History Library has a project of scanning FH books
        that you bring in. See details on http://books.familysearch.org/ and
        there are already over 40,000 FH books scanned and online there from the
        FHL, BYU Harold B. Lee Library, Allen County Public Library, Houston
        Public Library, and others. To have a book scanned you must hold the
        copyright and give them permission or else it must be out of copyright
        so it can be posted online. You take the book to the basement of the
        FHL and they will have it scanned for you in a couple of hours. This is
        a major resource of FH data.

        14. MarkLogic http://www.marklogic.com has a program that organizes
        and searches large databases that are not in uniform format. It allows
        many different types of searches and updates the searches as new data is
        added to the database. It is mainly for very large databases that
        companies want to be able to search. The software is free and the
        program is free to use, if the database is smaller than 40 gigs. I
        haven't tried it yet, but it may be just what I need for the text file
        database I have made of the personal letter collection of Erastus Snow
        and his family. We have about 300 family letters and that many more
        official and Church letters. The transcribed personal letter collection
        alone is several hundred single-spaced typed pages with combined file
        size of several gigs. I am anxious to learn how to use the program to
        see if it is a good search tool for such a database. It has proximity
        and other types of searches.

        15. The website http://www.geni.com/ claims to be the world's
        largest family tree with 61 million profiles (names). They have a basic
        plan that is free and two higher commercial levels which have more
        features. Some of their information is free and they have projects that
        people are posting such as about the Mormon Battalion, the Nauvoo
        Legion, Early Mormon Pioneers, early Mormon leaders, and many others.
        You can upload GEDCOM's, photos, and documents, and they have a facial
        recognition program that when you identify an ancestor in a photo it
        searches the rest of your photos to see if it can find other photos with
        that person. There is a way that libraries and organizations can sign
        up so their members can use the Geni Public Access program free - see
        http://www.geni.com/corp/geni-public-access-program/ - but I don't know
        what that includes.

        16. Family history consultants could attend certain classes for free
        and those were all recorded and will be posted online at the Consultants
        Training website. The schedule of FH Consultant talks is at
        http://rootstech.org/trainingschedule and I think the Consultant website
        where the notes and videos will be posted is
        https://www.familysearch.org/consultant/ .

        17. There was lots of information at the conference on mobile apps
        for FH with entire classes on apps for iPads, etc.

        18. FamilySearch is looking for lots of volunteers to index the 1940
        U.S. Census as soon as it is released on 2 Apr 2012. They estimate that
        it will take several months to do the indexing and are encouraging
        people to sign up at https://familysearch.org/1940Census . There are
        already sites that help you find the 1940 Enumeration District, if you
        know the address, so you can find your people before the index is
        complete. One of the talks was by Steve Morse who has written about 200
        "One-Step" programs to search various websites or do various genealogy
        tasks, one of which is how to find the 1940 Census Enumeration Districts
        - see http://stevemorse.org/ .

        I learned lots more than this, but this is a start. It was a good
        conference with something for everyone and we appreciate FamilySearch,
        BYU, and all the other sponsors spending their time, money, and efforts
        for us.

        Don Snow

        --
        Dr. Donald R. Snow, Retired Professor of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah - snowd@...




        --

        Bill Buchanan
        website: http://billbuchanan.byethost17.com
        blog: http://billbuchanan.blogspot.com


      • Donald R. Snow
        Thanks, Bill. Glad you caught the error. It was too late last night when I finished it. Don ... -- Dr. Donald R. Snow, Retired Professor of Mathematics,
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 7, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks, Bill.  Glad you caught the error.  It was too late last night when I finished it.

          Don


          On 2/7/2012 7:28 AM, Bill Buchanan wrote:  
          Don,
           
          This is good useful information, but I would like to correct a URL.
           
          "11. Many of you are aware of the free 9-generation pedigree fan
          chart that Matt Misbach's TreeSeek company is providing with your
          FamilySearch data - go to http://www.createfan.com and log in with
          your LDS account to generate it. You can view it and save off the pdf
          or have it printed in various ways. Matt told me that you can do free
          9-generation fan charts starting with other PID's by going to his
          http://www.treesee.com , using your LDS account, and entering the
          starting PID in the box."
          The correct URL is http://www.treeseek.com 
          Just out of curiosity I looked up George Washington's PID in nFS, and then printed a 9-generation fan chart for him at http://www.treeseek.com by using that PID.
           
          Now, if we could convince Matt to add a free 4 generation pedigree chart for newly-called missionaries, that would be another great service! All new missionaries are expected to bring a 4-generation pedigree chart to their MTC, but unless the family has their genealogy in their desktop software this is difficult to do. Pedigrees printed directly from nFS have only the names with no dates or places.
           
           
          Bill Buchanan
           
          On Tue, Feb 7, 2012 at 2:33 AM, Donald R. Snow <snowd@...> wrote:
           

          SOME THINGS I LEARNED AT ROOTSTECH 2012
          2-4 Feb 2012, Salt Palace, Salt Lake City, Utah
          ©2012 by Donald R. Snow

          These are not in any particular order and are only a few of the things I
          learned and, undoubtedly, other people learned many other things. This
          is posted at http://uvtagg.org/classes/dons/dons-classes.html and may
          be used for any non-profit purpose, newsletter, etc., but please let me
          know if you do use it. Thanks. snowd@... .

          1. The entire RootsTech 2012 syllabus and program schedule is online
          at http://www.rootstech.org for anyone to look and/or download
          regardless of whether they attended the meeting or not. Those were
          posted 2 or 3 weeks before the meeting so attendees could look at and
          print off what they wanted, but it has also been available to everyone.
          I think it's a very helpful thing for family history everywhere.

          2. The keynote presentations and classes that were in the main
          lecture room all day long each day, Thursday through Saturday, were
          streamed live on the website and were recorded. They are now posted
          there for anyone to watch. Jay Verkler's keynote address on the first
          day about what's in the future for family history and technology was
          really spectacular.

          3. RootsTech 2013 will be 21-23 Mar 2013, so it will be 6 weeks later
          in the year than this year's meeting.

          4. Ancestry has several new things on their website, including some
          new search techniques. On their census images they now have a way to
          put a colored background behind the entire family you want and a
          different color on the particular line of that family. With that it is
          much easier to follow the entire census form across the page. They have
          lots of other new stuff too. See their notes.

          5. Dallan Quass of http://www.werelate.org has posted on his
          website a table of name variants, 200,000 for sunames and 70,000 for
          given names. These help greatly in genealogy searching. He has already
          put it into operation on WeRelate and is asking people to fine-tune the
          list as they do searches, if they see names that shouldn't be in the
          list or know of others that should be. Anyone can download the table to
          use themselves. I think Dallan also has a place variant list, but I
          didn't attend that talk.

          6. Someone mentioned that all the talks were being recorded and would
          be posted along with the PowerPoint slides synchronized, but I didn't
          hear that officially.

          7. The class on Evernote discussed how it can be used for personal
          and family history uses and that it has some really helpful stuff.
          Also, there are add-ons for browsers that are helpful for Evernote and
          many things, e.g. "Clarify" is an add-on that makes text from websites
          show up with better formatting so it is easier to read and copy and
          paste. Do Google searches for Clarify for the browser you use.

          8. Barbara Renick's 19 pages of notes for her SnagIt workshop are
          posted and have lots of helpful information. SnagIt is a very useful,
          but commercial, screen and video capture program.

          9. Fold3 http://www.fold3.com says they have the largest collection
          of U.S. military records on the web. Much of it can be searched and
          used for free. They had a half-price deal on their subscriptions for
          RootsTech attendees, but also said that since Ancestry now owns them,
          that anyone with an Ancestry subscription can get the half-price
          subscription to Fold3 at anytime. On Fold3 there are Memorial pages set
          up already for millions of people, e.g. already for everyone in the
          Social Security Death Index, and you can set up others for free. You
          can then add data, images, stories, etc., and link to the memorial page
          from anywhere else, including from (new) FamilySearch. Eventually,
          FamilySearch will allow us to upload images, etc., but not yet, so this
          makes a good way to post images and data now and put the link into nFS.

          10. There is a beta test of (new) FamilySearch going on right now to
          add sources and active links into nFS, but you have to be invited.

          11. Many of you are aware of the free 9-generation pedigree fan
          chart that Matt Misbach's TreeSeek company is providing with your
          FamilySearch data - go to http://www.createfan.com and log in with
          your LDS account to generate it. You can view it and save off the pdf
          or have it printed in various ways. Matt told me that you can do free
          9-generation fan charts starting with other PID's by going to his
          http://www.treesee.com , using your LDS account, and entering the
          starting PID in the box.

          12. Darrin Lythgoe has just released version 9 of "The Next
          Generation" software - http://www.tngsitebuilding.com . It is a
          commercial program that makes web pages with your genealogy data for
          posting online, but the web pages can also just be run on your own
          computer to show your data in various ways. It requires the free PHP
          which can be installed on your computer using a free download from
          http://www.wampserver.com/en/ .

          13. The Family History Library has a project of scanning FH books
          that you bring in. See details on http://books.familysearch.org/ and
          there are already over 40,000 FH books scanned and online there from the
          FHL, BYU Harold B. Lee Library, Allen County Public Library, Houston
          Public Library, and others. To have a book scanned you must hold the
          copyright and give them permission or else it must be out of copyright
          so it can be posted online. You take the book to the basement of the
          FHL and they will have it scanned for you in a couple of hours. This is
          a major resource of FH data.

          14. MarkLogic http://www.marklogic.com has a program that organizes
          and searches large databases that are not in uniform format. It allows
          many different types of searches and updates the searches as new data is
          added to the database. It is mainly for very large databases that
          companies want to be able to search. The software is free and the
          program is free to use, if the database is smaller than 40 gigs. I
          haven't tried it yet, but it may be just what I need for the text file
          database I have made of the personal letter collection of Erastus Snow
          and his family. We have about 300 family letters and that many more
          official and Church letters. The transcribed personal letter collection
          alone is several hundred single-spaced typed pages with combined file
          size of several gigs. I am anxious to learn how to use the program to
          see if it is a good search tool for such a database. It has proximity
          and other types of searches.

          15. The website http://www.geni.com/ claims to be the world's
          largest family tree with 61 million profiles (names). They have a basic
          plan that is free and two higher commercial levels which have more
          features. Some of their information is free and they have projects that
          people are posting such as about the Mormon Battalion, the Nauvoo
          Legion, Early Mormon Pioneers, early Mormon leaders, and many others.
          You can upload GEDCOM's, photos, and documents, and they have a facial
          recognition program that when you identify an ancestor in a photo it
          searches the rest of your photos to see if it can find other photos with
          that person. There is a way that libraries and organizations can sign
          up so their members can use the Geni Public Access program free - see
          http://www.geni.com/corp/geni-public-access-program/ - but I don't know
          what that includes.

          16. Family history consultants could attend certain classes for free
          and those were all recorded and will be posted online at the Consultants
          Training website. The schedule of FH Consultant talks is at
          http://rootstech.org/trainingschedule and I think the Consultant website
          where the notes and videos will be posted is
          https://www.familysearch.org/consultant/ .

          17. There was lots of information at the conference on mobile apps
          for FH with entire classes on apps for iPads, etc.

          18. FamilySearch is looking for lots of volunteers to index the 1940
          U.S. Census as soon as it is released on 2 Apr 2012. They estimate that
          it will take several months to do the indexing and are encouraging
          people to sign up at https://familysearch.org/1940Census . There are
          already sites that help you find the 1940 Enumeration District, if you
          know the address, so you can find your people before the index is
          complete. One of the talks was by Steve Morse who has written about 200
          "One-Step" programs to search various websites or do various genealogy
          tasks, one of which is how to find the 1940 Census Enumeration Districts
          - see http://stevemorse.org/ .

          I learned lots more than this, but this is a start. It was a good
          conference with something for everyone and we appreciate FamilySearch,
          BYU, and all the other sponsors spending their time, money, and efforts
          for us.

          Don Snow

          --
          Dr. Donald R. Snow, Retired Professor of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah - snowd@...




          --

          Bill Buchanan
          website: http://billbuchanan.byethost17.com
          blog: http://billbuchanan.blogspot.com



          -- 
          Dr. Donald R. Snow, Retired Professor of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah - snowd@...
          
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.