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no a:/ or d:/ in explorer

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  • Patty Gaddis
    We have a computer at the FHC with a CD reader in it. I know it worked at one point as we loaded all the software from it. But, I was recently told it isn t
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 25, 2006
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      We have a computer at the FHC with a CD reader in it. I know it worked at
      one point as we loaded all the software from it. But, I was recently told
      it isn't working. When you go into Explorer, the drive does not show. All
      the other drives, including the mapped drives appear.

      I didn't do the checking on the CD, but was told that they tried 3
      different drives (all used) in the computer and none will display. The
      door will open and close so it is getting power.

      I don't even know where to begin looking for things. The person assured me
      they checked all the wires and they were all connected on both ends
      securely. I also made sure they changed cables in case that was it.

      Am having a similar problem with a friend's computer where the floppy won't
      display. Their computer had been on the floor when the house flooded with
      4" of water. They purchased a new computer but without a floppy
      drive. Since the one in the old computer was in the top of the case we
      assumed it would be okay so just installed it in the new case. But, it
      won't show in explorer either. I haven't had a chance to go check on this
      one. Just thought I'd mention it since it was a similar problem and might
      have a different solution.

      Any ideas on what I should be looking for? The floppy may have gotten
      fried when the flooding happened. They aren't sure if it was on or not
      when the rains came. But, the other computer was not damaged by any flooding.

      Thanks, Patty
    • RussellHltn
      To show up TWO cables have to be working. Both the power and the data cable. It s possible they got the data cable in backwards or off by one pin. Once they
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 25, 2006
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        To show up TWO cables have to be working.  Both the power and the data cable.  It’s possible they got the data cable in backwards or off by one pin.  Once they got it in backwards, the kept putting in the replacements the same way.  Or perhaps the CD is on its own controller and it’s been disabled in CMOS or Windows Device Manager.

         

        Same goes for the floppy.  If the unit came without, the controller may have been disabled.

        _,_._,___

      • merloutre
        They had swapped out the data cable at one point. And, I think it was one of the ones that you could only put in one way. I know he was aware of it as he
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 25, 2006
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          They had swapped out the data cable at one point. And, I think it
          was
          one of the ones that you could only put in one way. I know he was
          aware of it as he asked me. I was in the room, but busy with another
          computer at the time.

          You said the CD could be on it's own controller. How would I tell
          this? I did go into the BIOS and tried different settings for the
          drive. It is on the secondary slot as the primary drive with nothing
          else on it.

          We did go into the device manager, but I can't remember now what we
          found (or didn't find). I'll go back over tomorrow when we aren't
          open
          and can pay more attention to what is there. I do remember there
          wasn't a X or ? on it if it was there.

          If it has been disabled in the device manager, how do I enable it?
          This is going to be a stupd question but what is CMOS? Is that just
          the BIOS? Or, are they two different things?

          Thanks, Patty

          p.s. Just wondering. The e-mail I got delivered to me has nothing
          in it. I came to the web page to respond to this. Did that happen
          to anyone else?

          --- In fhctech@yahoogroups.com, RussellHltn <RussellHltn@...> wrote:
          >
          > To show up TWO cables have to be working. Both the power and the
          data
          > cable. It's possible they got the data cable in backwards or off
          by
          one
          > pin. Once they got it in backwards, the kept putting in the
          replacements
          > the same way. Or perhaps the CD is on its own controller and it's
          been
          > disabled in CMOS or Windows Device Manager.
          >
          >
          >
          > Same goes for the floppy. If the unit came without, the controller
          may have
          > been disabled.
          >
          > _,_._,___
          >
        • RussellHltn
          ... was one of the ones that you could only put in one way.
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 26, 2006
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            >>> They had swapped out the data cable at one point. And, I think it
            was one of the ones that you could only put in one way.<<<

            Verify. I've run across some that weren't right and connectors that would
            allow you to put it in more then one way.


            >>> You said the CD could be on it's own controller. How would I tell
            this? <<<

            It will be on it's own cable and not shared with other devices.


            >>> I did go into the BIOS and tried different settings for the
            drive. It is on the secondary slot as the primary drive with nothing
            else on it.<<<

            There should be a setting for CD. Don't use the settings for hard drives
            (track, sectors, etc.)

            >>> If it has been disabled in the device manager, how do I enable it? <<<

            If it's been disabled then you'll see a red "X". Right click and you can
            enable it.


            >>> This is going to be a stupd question but what is CMOS? Is that just
            the BIOS? Or, are they two different things? <<<

            They are two different things, but for practical purposes, consider them the
            same.
          • Patty Gaddis
            Thanks, Russell. I ll check these things out. So, it is on it s own controller then as it is the only thing on the cable. Patty
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 26, 2006
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              Thanks, Russell. I'll check these things out. So, it is on it's own
              controller then as it is the only thing on the cable.

              Patty
              At 05:31 AM 6/26/2006, you wrote:

              > >>> They had swapped out the data cable at one point. And, I think it
              >was one of the ones that you could only put in one way.<<<
              >
              >Verify. I've run across some that weren't right and connectors that would
              >allow you to put it in more then one way.
              >
              > >>> You said the CD could be on it's own controller. How would I tell
              >this? <<<
              >
              >It will be on it's own cable and not shared with other devices.
              >
              > >>> I did go into the BIOS and tried different settings for the
              >drive. It is on the secondary slot as the primary drive with nothing
              >else on it.<<<
              >
              >There should be a setting for CD. Don't use the settings for hard drives
              >(track, sectors, etc.)
              >
              > >>> If it has been disabled in the device manager, how do I enable it? <<<
              >
              >If it's been disabled then you'll see a red "X". Right click and you can
              >enable it.
              >
              > >>> This is going to be a stupd question but what is CMOS? Is that just
              >the BIOS? Or, are they two different things? <<<
              >
              >They are two different things, but for practical purposes, consider them the
              >same.
            • Bill Henderson
              Hi; Mind I throw my 2 cents worth in? From your recently told it wasn t working, tells me you do not have personal knowledge of the computer s antics. Is
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 26, 2006
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                Hi;
                 
                Mind I throw my 2 cents worth in?
                 
                From your "recently told it wasn't working,"  tells me you do not have personal knowledge of the computer's antics.  Is that true?  If so, I suggest you get acquainted with it.. 
                 
                I asume the computer boots up in the windows operating system, yes??  What OS is it using anyway??
                 
                Let's start with something simple first.  Do you have a bootable floppy disk?  If so, try to boot the computer with it.  If it boots, you know that A: drive works, and that problem has to be somewhere else.  If it doesn't boot, did the drive attempt to spin?
                If it spins, at least the power and the data cables are attached. Then I would check the BIOS as suggested by Russelhltn.  If it didn't spin, crack the case and check the cables.
                 
                If you don't have a bootable floppy disk, I have included a simple copy of the autoexec.bat and config.sys files needed to make one with CDROM operation.  You can make a system (bootable) floppy with almost any operation system.  I just made one with WindowsXP as a test.  But you'll need a Windows 9x computer or DOS disks to get the other files you'll need.  If you don't have a Win9x computer, here are a couple DOS websites that should have them or at least links to other sites that may have them.
                 
                 
                By-the-way; is your BIOS password protected?  If not, this could be the reason you can't see or use these drives anymore.  A little mischief goes a long way.
                 
                If the BIOS (actually CMOS) settings are OK, then it is time to crack the case and check the cabling.   34-line (aka 34-pin) data cables are used for floppy drives. 40-pin cables are used for ATA (IDE) harddrives.  One edge of the data cables is colored (usually red), but I've seen blue, black, and black hatch-marked.  The colored edge is the number line of the cable.  Properly setup, both cable should have the colored line nearest the 4-pin, power connection.  Obviously, they have to be plugged into the motherboard with the colored edge where the number 1 is printed on the motherboard.  Usually this is not a real problem because the connectors have an key that prevents them from being inserted backwards.  The power cables should be checked to see if they are firmly fastened into their connectors too. 
                 
                After checking the cables, try to bootup with the floppy disk again.  If it still doesn't boot, either your floppy drive defective (it didn't spin), or the heads are so dirty they can't read the disk.  If you have a spare floppy drive, swap the computer's floppy for the spare and check to see if you can bootup.
                 
                By this time either the floppy bootup should work.  If your floppy has the files, autoexec.bat and config.sys programs on it, you should be able to use the CDROM too.  If both the floppy drive and CDROM work in DOS the problem is in the Windows operating system (where I suspect the problem really is - but you got to check the basics first).   If the Windows OS is the culprit, the simplest solution is to repair or reinstall the OS.  Win2k and WinXP have repair options.  If you have a "ghost" clone disk that might be the way to go.  I'd also try the other solutions offered on this too. 
                 
                >>This is going to be a stupd question but what is CMOS? Is that just
                the BIOS? Or, are they two different things?
                 
                Not a stupid question.  Most people aren't sure of this either. 
                 
                Answer: They are two different things that work together and often used to mean the same thing.  Your BIOS is one or two ROM chips that start the bootup process.  It is hardcoded thus, NOT changeable.  Nowdays the BIOS is "flashable" and called firmware (and they can be upgraded, but once upgraded they do not change without another upgrade).  It sets up the information tables telling everything where everything else is.  CMOS is a separate memory chip that contains all the settings used by your BIOS to control the boot process.  CMOS uses that little battery inside the computer to maintain its memory settings.  When you tell the computer which order you want your bootup devices to follow: ie, floppy, harddrive, cdrom; CMOS remembers that order and tells the BIOS to initiate the bootup in that order.  CMOS also remembers your harddrive information (BIOS has no clue about the size or configuration of your harddrive).  BIOS says; use my keyboard, it is located at this memory location.  CMOS says I have a 101-key keyboard (vs an 84-key or 105-key keyboard). 
                 

                Bill H


                Patty Gaddis <geneamom@...> wrote:
                We have a computer at the FHC with a CD reader in it. I know it worked at
                one point as we loaded all the software from it. But, I was recently told
                it isn't working. When you go into Explorer, the drive does not show. All
                the other drives, including the mapped drives appear.

                I didn't do the checking on the CD, but was told that they tried 3
                different drives (all used) in the computer and none will display. The
                door will open and close so it is getting power.

                I don't even know where to begin looking for things. The person assured me
                they checked all the wires and they were all connected on both ends
                securely. I also made sure they changed cables in case that was it.

                Am having a similar problem with a friend's computer where the floppy won't
                display. Their computer had been on the floor when the house flooded with
                4" of water. They purchased a new computer but without a floppy
                drive. Since the one in the old computer was in the top of the case we
                assumed it would be okay so just installed it in the new case. But, it
                won't show in explorer either. I haven't had a chance to go check on this
                one. Just thought I'd mention it since it was a similar problem and might
                have a different solution.

                Any ideas on what I should be looking for? The floppy may have gotten
                fried when the flooding happened. They aren't sure if it was on or not
                when the rains came. But, the other computer was not damaged by any flooding.

                Thanks, Patty



                Do you Yahoo!?
                Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

              • merloutre
                Thanks, Bill. I did not see this message until after I d already spent some time checking some things. I work in our FHC three times a month as a librarian and
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 2, 2006
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                  Thanks, Bill.

                  I did not see this message until after I'd already spent some time
                  checking some things.

                  I work in our FHC three times a month as a librarian and during those
                  times and additional time in the library keep our 8 computer network
                  running. (Or, try to at least with my limited knowledge :-) ) This
                  particular computer is one of the older and slowest computers we
                  have. They all run Win2000 Professional.

                  The problem computer does boot up in Windows and except for the CD
                  drive not working, seems fine. I've had no other problems with it.

                  I do not have the BIOS password protected yet. We had been trying to
                  get all the software installed after upgrading all the computers to
                  Win2000. One other person and I have been the only ones installing
                  the software. Once I could get all the computers up to speed (it's
                  turning out to be a very slow process as I can't be here for hours on
                  end like I wish I could) I was planning on locking BIOS, etc. For
                  now they are set for admin and patron signons for Windows is all.

                  I have tried going into the BIOS and setting the drive for different
                  settings. But, no matter what I set as User 1, User 2, Auto, it
                  won't see it. It does not show me the CD options on any of the
                  Primary or Secondary slots. As an experiment today, I switched the
                  hard drive for the CD drive on the mother board. The hard drive
                  would not boot when plugged into that slot.

                  So, I'm assuming it has to do with that particular "port". I don't
                  know what word to use.

                  When I go into MyComputer > Manage > Device Manager there is no
                  DVD/CD Rom drives in the list to enable or disable. Now what do I
                  do? Does that mean the whole motherboard needs to be replaced? Or,
                  is it possible to just replace that "port". Or, what?

                  I will try the floppy suggestion on the computer (a friend's) that is
                  having the floppy problem. Although, I'm suspecting that maybe it is
                  just disabled in the manager since it wasn't shipped with a floppy
                  drive. Haven't had a chance to get to her house to check that yet.

                  We just got word from SLC before the holiday weekend that they are
                  shipping us another computer in the next few weeks. I'm not sure
                  why. The last computer we got from them was maybe 3/4 years ago.
                  They did not give us a specific reason for shipping this computer.
                  So, not sure if it is supposed to be for something else. Or, we can
                  use it any way we wish.

                  My power is back on at home, so need to go finish laundry and dishes.

                  Thanks, Patty

                  --- In fhctech@yahoogroups.com, Bill Henderson <wch3120@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi;
                  >
                  > Mind I throw my 2 cents worth in?
                  >
                  > From your "recently told it wasn't working," tells me you do not
                  have personal knowledge of the computer's antics. Is that true? If
                  so, I suggest you get acquainted with it..
                  >
                  > I asume the computer boots up in the windows operating system,
                  yes?? What OS is it using anyway??
                  >
                  > Let's start with something simple first. Do you have a bootable
                  floppy disk? If so, try to boot the computer with it. If it boots,
                  you know that A: drive works, and that problem has to be somewhere
                  else. If it doesn't boot, did the drive attempt to spin?
                  > If it spins, at least the power and the data cables are attached.
                  Then I would check the BIOS as suggested by Russelhltn. If it didn't
                  spin, crack the case and check the cables.
                  >
                  > If you don't have a bootable floppy disk, I have included a
                  simple copy of the autoexec.bat and config.sys files needed to make
                  one with CDROM operation. You can make a system (bootable) floppy
                  with almost any operation system. I just made one with WindowsXP as
                  a test. But you'll need a Windows 9x computer or DOS disks to get
                  the other files you'll need. If you don't have a Win9x computer,
                  here are a couple DOS websites that should have them or at least
                  links to other sites that may have them.
                  >
                  > http://2dos.homepage.dk/batutil/help/INDEX.HTM#d
                  > http://www.undercoverdesign.com/dosghost/dos/dos_vers.asp#msdos
                  >
                  > By-the-way; is your BIOS password protected? If not, this could
                  be the reason you can't see or use these drives anymore. A little
                  mischief goes a long way.
                  >
                  > If the BIOS (actually CMOS) settings are OK, then it is time to
                  crack the case and check the cabling. 34-line (aka 34-pin) data
                  cables are used for floppy drives. 40-pin cables are used for ATA
                  (IDE) harddrives. One edge of the data cables is colored (usually
                  red), but I've seen blue, black, and black hatch-marked. The colored
                  edge is the number line of the cable. Properly setup, both cable
                  should have the colored line nearest the 4-pin, power connection.
                  Obviously, they have to be plugged into the motherboard with the
                  colored edge where the number 1 is printed on the motherboard.
                  Usually this is not a real problem because the connectors have an key
                  that prevents them from being inserted backwards. The power cables
                  should be checked to see if they are firmly fastened into their
                  connectors too.
                  >
                  > After checking the cables, try to bootup with the floppy disk
                  again. If it still doesn't boot, either your floppy drive defective
                  (it didn't spin), or the heads are so dirty they can't read the
                  disk. If you have a spare floppy drive, swap the computer's floppy
                  for the spare and check to see if you can bootup.
                  >
                  > By this time either the floppy bootup should work. If your
                  floppy has the files, autoexec.bat and config.sys programs on it, you
                  should be able to use the CDROM too. If both the floppy drive and
                  CDROM work in DOS the problem is in the Windows operating system
                  (where I suspect the problem really is - but you got to check the
                  basics first). If the Windows OS is the culprit, the simplest
                  solution is to repair or reinstall the OS. Win2k and WinXP have
                  repair options. If you have a "ghost" clone disk that might be the
                  way to go. I'd also try the other solutions offered on this too.
                  >
                  > >>This is going to be a stupd question but what is CMOS? Is that
                  just
                  > the BIOS? Or, are they two different things?
                  >
                  > Not a stupid question. Most people aren't sure of this either.
                  >
                  > Answer: They are two different things that work together and
                  often used to mean the same thing. Your BIOS is one or two ROM chips
                  that start the bootup process. It is hardcoded thus, NOT
                  changeable. Nowdays the BIOS is "flashable" and called firmware (and
                  they can be upgraded, but once upgraded they do not change without
                  another upgrade). It sets up the information tables telling
                  everything where everything else is. CMOS is a separate memory chip
                  that contains all the settings used by your BIOS to control the boot
                  process. CMOS uses that little battery inside the computer to
                  maintain its memory settings. When you tell the computer which order
                  you want your bootup devices to follow: ie, floppy, harddrive, cdrom;
                  CMOS remembers that order and tells the BIOS to initiate the bootup
                  in that order. CMOS also remembers your harddrive information (BIOS
                  has no clue about the size or configuration of your harddrive). BIOS
                  says; use my keyboard, it is located at this memory
                  > location. CMOS says I have a 101-key keyboard (vs an 84-key or
                  105-key keyboard).
                  >
                  >
                  > Bill H
                  >
                  >
                  > Patty Gaddis <geneamom@...> wrote:
                  > We have a computer at the FHC with a CD reader in it. I
                  know it worked at
                  > one point as we loaded all the software from it. But, I was
                  recently told
                  > it isn't working. When you go into Explorer, the drive does not
                  show. All
                  > the other drives, including the mapped drives appear.
                  >
                  > I didn't do the checking on the CD, but was told that they tried 3
                  > different drives (all used) in the computer and none will display.
                  The
                  > door will open and close so it is getting power.
                  >
                  > I don't even know where to begin looking for things. The person
                  assured me
                  > they checked all the wires and they were all connected on both ends
                  > securely. I also made sure they changed cables in case that was it.
                  >
                  > Am having a similar problem with a friend's computer where the
                  floppy won't
                  > display. Their computer had been on the floor when the house
                  flooded with
                  > 4" of water. They purchased a new computer but without a floppy
                  > drive. Since the one in the old computer was in the top of the case
                  we
                  > assumed it would be okay so just installed it in the new case. But,
                  it
                  > won't show in explorer either. I haven't had a chance to go check
                  on this
                  > one. Just thought I'd mention it since it was a similar problem and
                  might
                  > have a different solution.
                  >
                  > Any ideas on what I should be looking for? The floppy may have
                  gotten
                  > fried when the flooding happened. They aren't sure if it was on or
                  not
                  > when the rains came. But, the other computer was not damaged by any
                  flooding.
                  >
                  > Thanks, Patty
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Do you Yahoo!?
                  > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail Beta.
                  > ; CONFIG.SYS 3/30/2006 -(simple version)
                  > ;
                  > ; Required Files (available with DOS & Windows 9x):
                  > ; HIMEM.SYS, EMM386.EXE, USDIDE.SYS(or equivalent).
                  > ;
                  > ; USDIDE.SYS is a generic device driver for the CDROM, either use
                  the one that came
                  > ; with your CDROM or check the internet for the one I use.
                  Required to run a CDROM.
                  > ;////////1/////////2/////////3/////////4/////////5/////////6////////
                  /7/////////8////
                  >
                  > device=\himem.sys /testmem:off
                  > devicehigh=\usdide.sys /d:cdrom
                  > shell=command.com /p /e:1024
                  > set path=a:\;c:\;d:\
                  > set prompt=$p$g
                  > dos=high,umb
                  > BUFFERS=30,0
                  > FILES=25
                  >
                  > [COMMON]
                  > FCBS=1
                  > LASTDRIVE=Z
                  >
                • Gary Templeman
                  I am assuming you swapped the cable when you swapped the hard drive. And have you looked in Device Manager to see if the Secondary IDE Controller is present
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 2, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I am assuming you swapped the cable when you swapped the hard drive. And
                    have you looked in Device Manager to see if the Secondary IDE Controller is
                    present and functioning properly? It should show up even if nothing is
                    plugged into it.

                    It is not possible to replace the controller *on* the motherboard, but you
                    may be able to disable it in the BIOS or through device manager (you can
                    disable in DM with XP but I can't recall W2K), and use an add-on controller
                    card. The other option is to just ignore the Secondary channel and use an
                    external CD drive.

                    Gary Templeman

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "merloutre" <geneamom@...>
                    To: <fhctech@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2006 4:06 PM
                    Subject: [fhctech] Re: no a:/ or d:/ in explorer


                    > Thanks, Bill.
                    >
                    > I did not see this message until after I'd already spent some time
                    > checking some things.
                    >
                    > I work in our FHC three times a month as a librarian and during those
                    > times and additional time in the library keep our 8 computer network
                    > running. (Or, try to at least with my limited knowledge :-) ) This
                    > particular computer is one of the older and slowest computers we
                    > have. They all run Win2000 Professional.
                    >
                    > The problem computer does boot up in Windows and except for the CD
                    > drive not working, seems fine. I've had no other problems with it.
                    >
                    > I do not have the BIOS password protected yet. We had been trying to
                    > get all the software installed after upgrading all the computers to
                    > Win2000. One other person and I have been the only ones installing
                    > the software. Once I could get all the computers up to speed (it's
                    > turning out to be a very slow process as I can't be here for hours on
                    > end like I wish I could) I was planning on locking BIOS, etc. For
                    > now they are set for admin and patron signons for Windows is all.
                    >
                    > I have tried going into the BIOS and setting the drive for different
                    > settings. But, no matter what I set as User 1, User 2, Auto, it
                    > won't see it. It does not show me the CD options on any of the
                    > Primary or Secondary slots. As an experiment today, I switched the
                    > hard drive for the CD drive on the mother board. The hard drive
                    > would not boot when plugged into that slot.
                    >
                    > So, I'm assuming it has to do with that particular "port". I don't
                    > know what word to use.
                    >
                    > When I go into MyComputer > Manage > Device Manager there is no
                    > DVD/CD Rom drives in the list to enable or disable. Now what do I
                    > do? Does that mean the whole motherboard needs to be replaced? Or,
                    > is it possible to just replace that "port". Or, what?
                    >
                    > I will try the floppy suggestion on the computer (a friend's) that is
                    > having the floppy problem. Although, I'm suspecting that maybe it is
                    > just disabled in the manager since it wasn't shipped with a floppy
                    > drive. Haven't had a chance to get to her house to check that yet.
                    >
                    > We just got word from SLC before the holiday weekend that they are
                    > shipping us another computer in the next few weeks. I'm not sure
                    > why. The last computer we got from them was maybe 3/4 years ago.
                    > They did not give us a specific reason for shipping this computer.
                    > So, not sure if it is supposed to be for something else. Or, we can
                    > use it any way we wish.
                    >
                    > My power is back on at home, so need to go finish laundry and dishes.
                    >
                    > Thanks, Patty
                    >
                    > --- In fhctech@yahoogroups.com, Bill Henderson <wch3120@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> Hi;
                    >>
                    >> Mind I throw my 2 cents worth in?
                    >>
                    >> From your "recently told it wasn't working," tells me you do not
                    > have personal knowledge of the computer's antics. Is that true? If
                    > so, I suggest you get acquainted with it..
                    >>
                    >> I asume the computer boots up in the windows operating system,
                    > yes?? What OS is it using anyway??
                    >>
                    >> Let's start with something simple first. Do you have a bootable
                    > floppy disk? If so, try to boot the computer with it. If it boots,
                    > you know that A: drive works, and that problem has to be somewhere
                    > else. If it doesn't boot, did the drive attempt to spin?
                    >> If it spins, at least the power and the data cables are attached.
                    > Then I would check the BIOS as suggested by Russelhltn. If it didn't
                    > spin, crack the case and check the cables.
                    >>
                    >> If you don't have a bootable floppy disk, I have included a
                    > simple copy of the autoexec.bat and config.sys files needed to make
                    > one with CDROM operation. You can make a system (bootable) floppy
                    > with almost any operation system. I just made one with WindowsXP as
                    > a test. But you'll need a Windows 9x computer or DOS disks to get
                    > the other files you'll need. If you don't have a Win9x computer,
                    > here are a couple DOS websites that should have them or at least
                    > links to other sites that may have them.
                    >>
                    >> http://2dos.homepage.dk/batutil/help/INDEX.HTM#d
                    >> http://www.undercoverdesign.com/dosghost/dos/dos_vers.asp#msdos
                    >>
                    >> By-the-way; is your BIOS password protected? If not, this could
                    > be the reason you can't see or use these drives anymore. A little
                    > mischief goes a long way.
                    >>
                    >> If the BIOS (actually CMOS) settings are OK, then it is time to
                    > crack the case and check the cabling. 34-line (aka 34-pin) data
                    > cables are used for floppy drives. 40-pin cables are used for ATA
                    > (IDE) harddrives. One edge of the data cables is colored (usually
                    > red), but I've seen blue, black, and black hatch-marked. The colored
                    > edge is the number line of the cable. Properly setup, both cable
                    > should have the colored line nearest the 4-pin, power connection.
                    > Obviously, they have to be plugged into the motherboard with the
                    > colored edge where the number 1 is printed on the motherboard.
                    > Usually this is not a real problem because the connectors have an key
                    > that prevents them from being inserted backwards. The power cables
                    > should be checked to see if they are firmly fastened into their
                    > connectors too.
                    >>
                    >> After checking the cables, try to bootup with the floppy disk
                    > again. If it still doesn't boot, either your floppy drive defective
                    > (it didn't spin), or the heads are so dirty they can't read the
                    > disk. If you have a spare floppy drive, swap the computer's floppy
                    > for the spare and check to see if you can bootup.
                    >>
                    >> By this time either the floppy bootup should work. If your
                    > floppy has the files, autoexec.bat and config.sys programs on it, you
                    > should be able to use the CDROM too. If both the floppy drive and
                    > CDROM work in DOS the problem is in the Windows operating system
                    > (where I suspect the problem really is - but you got to check the
                    > basics first). If the Windows OS is the culprit, the simplest
                    > solution is to repair or reinstall the OS. Win2k and WinXP have
                    > repair options. If you have a "ghost" clone disk that might be the
                    > way to go. I'd also try the other solutions offered on this too.
                    >>
                    >> >>This is going to be a stupd question but what is CMOS? Is that
                    > just
                    >> the BIOS? Or, are they two different things?
                    >>
                    >> Not a stupid question. Most people aren't sure of this either.
                    >>
                    >> Answer: They are two different things that work together and
                    > often used to mean the same thing. Your BIOS is one or two ROM chips
                    > that start the bootup process. It is hardcoded thus, NOT
                    > changeable. Nowdays the BIOS is "flashable" and called firmware (and
                    > they can be upgraded, but once upgraded they do not change without
                    > another upgrade). It sets up the information tables telling
                    > everything where everything else is. CMOS is a separate memory chip
                    > that contains all the settings used by your BIOS to control the boot
                    > process. CMOS uses that little battery inside the computer to
                    > maintain its memory settings. When you tell the computer which order
                    > you want your bootup devices to follow: ie, floppy, harddrive, cdrom;
                    > CMOS remembers that order and tells the BIOS to initiate the bootup
                    > in that order. CMOS also remembers your harddrive information (BIOS
                    > has no clue about the size or configuration of your harddrive). BIOS
                    > says; use my keyboard, it is located at this memory
                    >> location. CMOS says I have a 101-key keyboard (vs an 84-key or
                    > 105-key keyboard).
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Bill H
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Patty Gaddis <geneamom@...> wrote:
                    >> We have a computer at the FHC with a CD reader in it. I
                    > know it worked at
                    >> one point as we loaded all the software from it. But, I was
                    > recently told
                    >> it isn't working. When you go into Explorer, the drive does not
                    > show. All
                    >> the other drives, including the mapped drives appear.
                    >>
                    >> I didn't do the checking on the CD, but was told that they tried 3
                    >> different drives (all used) in the computer and none will display.
                    > The
                    >> door will open and close so it is getting power.
                    >>
                    >> I don't even know where to begin looking for things. The person
                    > assured me
                    >> they checked all the wires and they were all connected on both ends
                    >> securely. I also made sure they changed cables in case that was it.
                    >>
                    >> Am having a similar problem with a friend's computer where the
                    > floppy won't
                    >> display. Their computer had been on the floor when the house
                    > flooded with
                    >> 4" of water. They purchased a new computer but without a floppy
                    >> drive. Since the one in the old computer was in the top of the case
                    > we
                    >> assumed it would be okay so just installed it in the new case. But,
                    > it
                    >> won't show in explorer either. I haven't had a chance to go check
                    > on this
                    >> one. Just thought I'd mention it since it was a similar problem and
                    > might
                    >> have a different solution.
                    >>
                    >> Any ideas on what I should be looking for? The floppy may have
                    > gotten
                    >> fried when the flooding happened. They aren't sure if it was on or
                    > not
                    >> when the rains came. But, the other computer was not damaged by any
                    > flooding.
                    >>
                    >> Thanks, Patty
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> ---------------------------------
                    >> Do you Yahoo!?
                    >> Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail Beta.
                    >> ; CONFIG.SYS 3/30/2006 -(simple version)
                    >> ;
                    >> ; Required Files (available with DOS & Windows 9x):
                    >> ; HIMEM.SYS, EMM386.EXE, USDIDE.SYS(or equivalent).
                    >> ;
                    >> ; USDIDE.SYS is a generic device driver for the CDROM, either use
                    > the one that came
                    >> ; with your CDROM or check the internet for the one I use.
                    > Required to run a CDROM.
                    >> ;////////1/////////2/////////3/////////4/////////5/////////6////////
                    > /7/////////8////
                    >>
                    >> device=\himem.sys /testmem:off
                    >> devicehigh=\usdide.sys /d:cdrom
                    >> shell=command.com /p /e:1024
                    >> set path=a:\;c:\;d:\
                    >> set prompt=$p$g
                    >> dos=high,umb
                    >> BUFFERS=30,0
                    >> FILES=25
                    >>
                    >> [COMMON]
                    >> FCBS=1
                    >> LASTDRIVE=Z
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Home Page: http://fhctech.org/
                    > Community email addresses:
                    > Post message: fhctech@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subscribe: fhctech-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > Unsubscribe: fhctech-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > List owner: Rick@...
                    > Shortcut URL to Yahoo! group page:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fhctech
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Bill Henderson
                    Setting and locking the BIOS is the first procedure I perform when configuring a new computer. Everything else can be redone, but a fouled BIOS is much more
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 2, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Setting and locking the BIOS is the first procedure I perform when configuring a new computer.  Everything else can be redone, but a fouled BIOS is much more difficult.  Protecting the BIOS will NOT affect other configuration items.
                       
                      Here are my procedures. There are based on HP computers, model dc7600 (except for the entry manner, most of the settings should be standard).:
                       
                       During bootup press F10 to open BIOS.
                      (HP computers)

                       Storage menu
                       1. Change boot order: HD, Floppy, CDROM, USB, NIC (Disable)
                       Security menu:

                       2. Setup Password – Install Admin password
                       3. Security ID – Ownership <tab>, enter ”Santa Clara Fam_Hist_Ctr #n”(#n = the workstation number – without quotes)

                       Advanced Menu
                       4. Power-on Options – Set F9 = Hidden, F12 = Hidden
                       5. Device Options – Numlock = on, Confirm printer = EPP+ECP
                       System Menu

                       6. Save BIOS configuration to Floppy
                       7. Save and Exit
                       8. Double-click the BIOS Configuration file to open Notepad
                       a. From the Menu select File, then page setup
                       b. In the Header field, delete &f and type in the following:&l”computername”&c&f&r&d (“computername” = the name of the computer without quotes)
                       c. Click OK to close and then print the file.
                      Concerning the hard drive cables: you should have two 40-pin hard drive cables, primary and secondary.  On the motherboard they may be identified as 0 and 1, or 1 and 2, or even primary and secondary.  BIOS settings and thus cables are set as primary master, primary slave, secondary master, and secondary slave.  The harddisk with your OS should always be on the primary cable and the harddisk is either set as master or cable select (using cable select, the OS drive must be on the end of the cable).  The CDROM can be in any other connection you desire.  Most people use the second cable (as master or cable select) to let the harddisk work faster.  Whatever your harddisk setting is -- don't change it.  Just set your cables to match the drive (it worked that way before, so if it ain't broke don't fix it). 
                       
                      If you are getting a PC from SLC, suspect it will be a HP dc7600.  That is what we have gotten most recently.  They are configured for standalone, CD operation.  So, if you have a network and you data files are on a server (or workstation acting like a server), you will have to reconfigure it.
                       
                      If your friend's computer didn't come with a floppy drive.  Most likely the instructions I gave you won't work.  New computers don't come with a floppy drive unless they are special configurations like the ones sent by SLC.  On a new computer, a floppy must be installed internally and activated in the BIOS.  Unless there is a change in the BIOS in the past two years, USB floppies are not recognized during bootup and won't take over the boot process.  ie. You can't boot from an external USB floppy drive.  By-the-way, It's not a good idea to mix the problems of two different computers in one request, it confuses people (it does to me anyway). 
                       
                      I am fairly sure the lost CDROM drive issue is an operating system (OS) problem.  Confirm this by moving the CDROM on the bad computer to another computer and test it there.  If it works, your OS needs to be reinstalled.  Otherwise, you have a bad drive.  If you are dealing with FHC computers, use the floppy to boot the computer and use the OS CDROM to run the reinstall REPAIR option.  If that works you are fixed.  If not, plan on rebuilding the whole system.  CDROMs are pretty basic in the OS setup and they don't work most fixes won't work.  The only other thing I can think to suggest is to go to Microsoft's Knowledgebase and see if you can find a write-up about the problem (and its fix). 
                       

                      merloutre <geneamom@...> wrote:
                      Thanks, Bill.

                      I did not see this message until after I'd already spent some time
                      checking some things.

                      I work in our FHC three times a month as a librarian and during those
                      times and additional time in the library keep our 8 computer network
                      running. (Or, try to at least with my limited knowledge :-) ) This
                      particular computer is one of the older and slowest computers we
                      have. They all run Win2000 Professional.

                      The problem computer does boot up in Windows and except for the CD
                      drive not working, seems fine. I've had no other problems with it.

                      I do not have the BIOS password protected yet. We had been trying to
                      get all the software installed after upgrading all the computers to
                      Win2000. One other person and I have been the only ones installing
                      the software. Once I could get all the computers up to speed (it's
                      turning out to be a very slow process as I can't be here for hours on
                      end like I wish I could) I was planning on locking BIOS, etc. For
                      now they are set for admin and patron signons for Windows is all.

                      I have tried going into the BIOS and setting the drive for different
                      settings. But, no matter what I set as User 1, User 2, Auto, it
                      won't see it. It does not show me the CD options on any of the
                      Primary or Secondary slots. As an experiment today, I switched the
                      hard drive for the CD drive on the mother board. The hard drive
                      would not boot when plugged into that slot.

                      So, I'm assuming it has to do with that particular "port". I don't
                      know what word to use.

                      When I go into MyComputer > Manage > Device Manager there is no
                      DVD/CD Rom drives in the list to enable or disable. Now what do I
                      do? Does that mean the whole motherboard needs to be replaced? Or,
                      is it possible to just replace that "port". Or, what?

                      I will try the floppy suggestion on the computer (a friend's) that is
                      having the floppy problem. Although, I'm suspecting that maybe it is
                      just disabled in the manager since it wasn't shipped with a floppy
                      drive. Haven't had a chance to get to her house to check that yet.

                      We just got word from SLC before the holiday weekend that they are
                      shipping us another computer in the next few weeks. I'm not sure
                      why. The last computer we got from them was maybe 3/4 years ago.
                      They did not give us a specific reason for shipping this computer.
                      So, not sure if it is supposed to be for something else. Or, we can
                      use it any way we wish.

                      My power is back on at home, so need to go finish laundry and dishes.

                      Thanks, Patty

                      --- In fhctech@yahoogroups .com, Bill Henderson <wch3120@... > wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi;
                      >
                      > Mind I throw my 2 cents worth in?
                      >
                      > From your "recently told it wasn't working," tells me you do not
                      have personal knowledge of the computer's antics. Is that true? If
                      so, I suggest you get acquainted with it..
                      >
                      > I asume the computer boots up in the windows operating system,
                      yes?? What OS is it using anyway??
                      >
                      > Let's start with something simple first. Do you have a bootable
                      floppy disk? If so, try to boot the computer with it. If it boots,
                      you know that A: drive works, and that problem has to be somewhere
                      else. If it doesn't boot, did the drive attempt to spin?
                      > If it spins, at least the power and the data cables are attached.
                      Then I would check the BIOS as suggested by Russelhltn. If it didn't
                      spin, crack the case and check the cables.
                      >
                      > If you don't have a bootable floppy disk, I have included a
                      simple copy of the autoexec.bat and config.sys files needed to make
                      one with CDROM operation. You can make a system (bootable) floppy
                      with almost any operation system. I just made one with WindowsXP as
                      a test. But you'll need a Windows 9x computer or DOS disks to get
                      the other files you'll need. If you don't have a Win9x computer,
                      here are a couple DOS websites that should have them or at least
                      links to other sites that may have them.
                      >
                      > http://2dos. homepage. dk/batutil/ help/INDEX. HTM#d
                      > http://www.undercov erdesign. com/dosghost/ dos/dos_vers. asp#msdos
                      >
                      > By-the-way; is your BIOS password protected? If not, this could
                      be the reason you can't see or use these drives anymore. A little
                      mischief goes a long way.
                      >
                      > If the BIOS (actually CMOS) settings are OK, then it is time to
                      crack the case and check the cabling. 34-line (aka 34-pin) data
                      cables are used for floppy drives. 40-pin cables are used for ATA
                      (IDE) harddrives. One edge of the data cables is colored (usually
                      red), but I've seen blue, black, and black hatch-marked. The colored
                      edge is the number line of the cable. Properly setup, both cable
                      should have the colored line nearest the 4-pin, power connection.
                      Obviously, they have to be plugged into the motherboard with the
                      colored edge where the number 1 is printed on the motherboard.
                      Usually this is not a real problem because the connectors have an key
                      that prevents them from being inserted backwards. The power cables
                      should be checked to see if they are firmly fastened into their
                      connectors too.
                      >
                      > After checking the cables, try to bootup with the floppy disk
                      again. If it still doesn't boot, either your floppy drive defective
                      (it didn't spin), or the heads are so dirty they can't read the
                      disk. If you have a spare floppy drive, swap the computer's floppy
                      for the spare and check to see if you can bootup.
                      >
                      > By this time either the floppy bootup should work. If your
                      floppy has the files, autoexec.bat and config.sys programs on it, you
                      should be able to use the CDROM too. If both the floppy drive and
                      CDROM work in DOS the problem is in the Windows operating system
                      (where I suspect the problem really is - but you got to check the
                      basics first). If the Windows OS is the culprit, the simplest
                      solution is to repair or reinstall the OS. Win2k and WinXP have
                      repair options. If you have a "ghost" clone disk that might be the
                      way to go. I'd also try the other solutions offered on this too.
                      >
                      > >>This is going to be a stupd question but what is CMOS? Is that
                      just
                      > the BIOS? Or, are they two different things?
                      >
                      > Not a stupid question. Most people aren't sure of this either.
                      >
                      > Answer: They are two different things that work together and
                      often used to mean the same thing. Your BIOS is one or two ROM chips
                      that start the bootup process. It is hardcoded thus, NOT
                      changeable. Nowdays the BIOS is "flashable" and called firmware (and
                      they can be upgraded, but once upgraded they do not change without
                      another upgrade). It sets up the information tables telling
                      everything where everything else is. CMOS is a separate memory chip
                      that contains all the settings used by your BIOS to control the boot
                      process. CMOS uses that little battery inside the computer to
                      maintain its memory settings. When you tell the computer which order
                      you want your bootup devices to follow: ie, floppy, harddrive, cdrom;
                      CMOS remembers that order and tells the BIOS to initiate the bootup
                      in that order. CMOS also remembers your harddrive information (BIOS
                      has no clue about the size or configuration of your harddrive). BIOS
                      says; use my keyboard, it is located at this memory
                      > location. CMOS says I have a 101-key keyboard (vs an 84-key or
                      105-key keyboard).
                      >
                      >
                      > Bill H
                      >
                      >
                      > Patty Gaddis <geneamom@.. .> wrote:
                      > We have a computer at the FHC with a CD reader in it. I
                      know it worked at
                      > one point as we loaded all the software from it. But, I was
                      recently told
                      > it isn't working. When you go into Explorer, the drive does not
                      show. All
                      > the other drives, including the mapped drives appear.
                      >
                      > I didn't do the checking on the CD, but was told that they tried 3
                      > different drives (all used) in the computer and none will display.
                      The
                      > door will open and close so it is getting power.
                      >
                      > I don't even know where to begin looking for things. The person
                      assured me
                      > they checked all the wires and they were all connected on both ends
                      > securely. I also made sure they changed cables in case that was it.
                      >
                      > Am having a similar problem with a friend's computer where the
                      floppy won't
                      > display. Their computer had been on the floor when the house
                      flooded with
                      > 4" of water. They purchased a new computer but without a floppy
                      > drive. Since the one in the old computer was in the top of the case
                      we
                      > assumed it would be okay so just installed it in the new case. But,
                      it
                      > won't show in explorer either. I haven't had a chance to go check
                      on this
                      > one. Just thought I'd mention it since it was a similar problem and
                      might
                      > have a different solution.
                      >
                      > Any ideas on what I should be looking for? The floppy may have
                      gotten
                      > fried when the flooding happened. They aren't sure if it was on or
                      not
                      > when the rains came. But, the other computer was not damaged by any
                      flooding.
                      >
                      > Thanks, Patty
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------ --------- --------- ---
                      > Do you Yahoo!?
                      > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail Beta.
                      > ; CONFIG.SYS 3/30/2006 -(simple version)
                      > ;
                      > ; Required Files (available with DOS & Windows 9x):
                      > ; HIMEM.SYS, EMM386.EXE, USDIDE.SYS(or equivalent).
                      > ;
                      > ; USDIDE.SYS is a generic device driver for the CDROM, either use
                      the one that came
                      > ; with your CDROM or check the internet for the one I use.
                      Required to run a CDROM.
                      > ;////////1// ///////2/ ////////3/ ////////4/ ////////5/ ////////6/ ///////
                      /7/////////8/ ///
                      >
                      > device=\himem. sys /testmem:off
                      > devicehigh=\ usdide.sys /d:cdrom
                      > shell=command. com /p /e:1024
                      > set path=a:\;c:\ ;d:\
                      > set prompt=$p$g
                      > dos=high,umb
                      > BUFFERS=30,0
                      > FILES=25
                      >
                      > [COMMON]
                      > FCBS=1
                      > LASTDRIVE=Z
                      >



                      Sneak preview the all-new Yahoo.com. It's not radically different. Just radically better.

                    • Gary Templeman
                      ... From: Bill Henderson ... Testing out the CDROM in another computer is a good idea if that hasn t already been done. But it will only
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 3, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Bill Henderson" <wch3120@...>
                        >
                        > I am fairly sure the lost CDROM drive issue is an operating system (OS)
                        > problem. Confirm this by moving the CDROM on the bad computer to another
                        > computer and test it there. If it works, your OS needs to be reinstalled.
                        > Otherwise, you have a bad drive. If you are dealing with FHC computers,
                        > use the floppy to boot the computer and use the OS CDROM to run the
                        > reinstall REPAIR option. If that works you are fixed. If not, plan on
                        > rebuilding the whole system. CDROMs are pretty basic in the OS setup and
                        > they don't work most fixes won't work. The only other thing I can think
                        > to suggest is to go to Microsoft's Knowledgebase and see if you can find a
                        > write-up about the problem (and its fix).
                        >


                        Testing out the CDROM in another computer is a good idea if that hasn't
                        already been done. But it will only show whether the CDROM is good or bad.
                        It will not differentiate between an OS problem and a hardware problem on
                        the motherboard. I always try to configure my computers to show the entire
                        boot process, not just the proprietary image (Gateway, Dell, Compaq, etc.)
                        that they often give you. If the CDROM is good in a different computer, but
                        it is NOT recognized by the BIOS before the OS loads, then it is a
                        motherboard (or cable) and not an OS issue. The only way I know to easily
                        tell the difference is to be able to watch the boot process before the OS
                        comes into play. There can be a perfectly fine motherboard in terms of it's
                        internal operation, but if someone bent or broke a pin on the connector the
                        communication with the drive could be compromised. The other possibility is
                        that the power connector she has been using is bad. There should be others
                        available to try. As the BIOS checks for devices on the IDE connectors, you
                        should see the CDROM light flash, and be able to open and close the drawer.
                        That should happen even before an OS is installed if a known good CDROM has
                        power and a good connection to the mobo.

                        Gary Templeman
                      • Bill Henderson
                        Good info Gary, but I assumed this system s CDROM worked before and just recently failed. If nobody brole open the case, none of the hardware should be bent.
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 8, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Good info Gary, but I assumed this system's CDROM worked before and just recently failed.  If nobody brole open the case, none of the hardware should be bent.  Otherwise, check all the pins to the connectors.  If somebody moved the CDROM to a new cable or even a different location on the same cable their may be a jumper configuration issue (on the CDROM).  If the CDROM doesn't show up in the BIOS screens during the boot process, either the drive is kaput or the cabling and jumper is mismatched.  Testing on another machine determines if 'kaput' is the issue.  That is also why I try a floppy bootup.  If the drive works while booting from DOS, you have just checked everything up to the OS itself.  If it doesn't work, then the OS is probably NOT the problem.  Every tech-assistant should have a floppy boot disk, just for these kind of problems.

                          Gary Templeman <gtempleman1@...> wrote:

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Bill Henderson" <wch3120@yahoo. com>
                          >
                          > I am fairly sure the lost CDROM drive issue is an operating system (OS)
                          > problem. Confirm this by moving the CDROM on the bad computer to another
                          > computer and test it there. If it works, your OS needs to be reinstalled.
                          > Otherwise, you have a bad drive. If you are dealing with FHC computers,
                          > use the floppy to boot the computer and use the OS CDROM to run the
                          > reinstall REPAIR option. If that works you are fixed. If not, plan on
                          > rebuilding the whole system. CDROMs are pretty basic in the OS setup and
                          > they don't work most fixes won't work. The only other thing I can think
                          > to suggest is to go to Microsoft's Knowledgebase and see if you can find a
                          > write-up about the problem (and its fix).
                          >

                          Testing out the CDROM in another computer is a good idea if that hasn't
                          already been done. But it will only show whether the CDROM is good or bad.
                          It will not differentiate between an OS problem and a hardware problem on
                          the motherboard. I always try to configure my computers to show the entire
                          boot process, not just the proprietary image (Gateway, Dell, Compaq, etc.)
                          that they often give you. If the CDROM is good in a different computer, but
                          it is NOT recognized by the BIOS before the OS loads, then it is a
                          motherboard (or cable) and not an OS issue. The only way I know to easily
                          tell the difference is to be able to watch the boot process before the OS
                          comes into play. There can be a perfectly fine motherboard in terms of it's
                          internal operation, but if someone bent or broke a pin on the connector the
                          communication with the drive could be compromised. The other possibility is
                          that the power connector she has been using is bad. There should be others
                          available to try. As the BIOS checks for devices on the IDE connectors, you
                          should see the CDROM light flash, and be able to open and close the drawer.
                          That should happen even before an OS is installed if a known good CDROM has
                          power and a good connection to the mobo.

                          Gary Templeman



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