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58 results from messages in feline-heart

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  • At this point, we don't know what the heart murmur means, only that she has one. Yes, she should have a cardiac work-up done, which would include an echocardiogram preferably with a heart specialist. That should be helpful in telling you how serious the situation is and whether other medications are necessary. Depending on the results of the echocardiogram, your veterinarian may...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Jul 6, 2011
  • Ascites is an accumulation of fluid within the abdominal cavity. It can be caused by many different diseases and conditions. If there is enough fluid in the abdomen to make your cat uncomfortable, a veterinarian may be able to tap the abdomen and remove some it. However, there are concerns about losing too much protein by removing too much of the fluid also. Either way, removing...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Jun 24, 2011
  • There really is no one "set" dose of Lasix that is used each time it is given. The dosage is based on the amount (i.e. the severity) of the edema (or fluid) in the lungs as well as the cat's weight. Other health issues that might be impacted by the Lasix need to be considered as well. So, the dosage used for one cat might differ drastically from the dosage used for the next cat. I...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com May 16, 2011
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  • Hi Shania. I'm sorry to hear about your kitty. I think Adriann gave you some great advice. The only thing that I would add is that your veterinarian may need to do an echocardiogram (an ultrasound of the heart) to evaluate your kitty's heart most effectively. I definitely agree that a blood screen, including the thyroid testing that Adriann mentioned, is in order. His urine should...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Apr 28, 2011
  • ...Gazette (http://www.pet-health-care-gazette.com) -----Original Message----- From: Bob and Sue To: mielikkiborzoi ; feline-heart ; LorieAHuston Sent: Mon, Apr 25, 2011 5:34 pm Subject: Re: [FH] treasure I have always used the Cypro appetite stimulant with little to no effect...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Apr 25, 2011
  • There are medications, like cryptoheptadine and mirtazipine, that can be given to increase a cat's appetite if necessary. Your veterinarian or cardiologist should be able to help you make appropriate choices for Treasure to help him eat better. It is important that he keeps eating. Lorie Huston, DVM Pet Health Care Gazette (http://www.pet-health-care-gazette.com) -----Original...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Apr 25, 2011
  • Hi Liz. Congratulations on your newest family member. You're an angel for taking Yogi in! Any of the things you mentioned could be responsible for the neurologic problems. Or it could have been a primary neurological disease of some sort (like a spinal injury or FCE.) I think doing the echo is a good idea and keeping a check on his blood pressure and blood values (complete blood...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Apr 24, 2011
  • Excellent new, Renee. And so good to hear! I'm guessing everybody understands why you're hollering, even if your dog friends don't . Fingers crossed that things keep improving for you and Treasure! The Lasix doesn't take long to take effect, usually within a few hours if even that long. Lorie Huston, DVM Pet Health Care Gazette (http://www.pet-health-care-gazette.com...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Apr 24, 2011
  • I definitely have to agree with that. We try to keep stress levels to a minimum with any cat with heart disease. We're really just beginning to understand the profound effects that stress can have on our pets, even on healthy pets. And many people don't realize how even very simple things can be stressful for a cat...things like a change in his people's routines or work schedules...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Apr 21, 2011
  • Ziggy's situation is a tough one and you've received a lot of advice here already. Remember, in a situation like this, there are no right or wrong answers. In the end, you have to make decisions that work best for those of you directly involved in the situation. I agree with the others that the Lasix (furosemide) is the most important medication to worry about since it is the one...
    LorieAHuston@cs.com Apr 19, 2011