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Re: [FH] Re: BP Generally get similar readings w/arm & tail?

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  • arkrabs@aol.com
    Are you generally seeing similar readings when taking bp from the arm and the tail? If there is a difference, which tends to be higher and by how much? We
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 30, 2002
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      Are you generally seeing similar readings when taking bp from the arm and the
      tail? If there is a difference, which tends to be higher and by how much?
      We were told it was more accurate to use the arm, but the tail is so much
      easier for us when we check it at home. Our regular vet used the tail too,
      so I've never had a cat checked both ways for a comparison.
      Thanks!
      Sandy

      sallymerlin@... a message dated 7/29/2002 12:20:42 PM Central
      Daylight Time, foxfried@... writes:
      > she reads
      > off
      > > his arm and off his tail...(he had a HUGE difference once between
      > the
      > > two....we figured it was Dr. error, not cat wierdness)




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • marcijoy2002
      I can t imagine a cat allowing you to take the bp from the tail. Does the cat have to keep the tail still in order to give a proper reading? I would imagine it
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 30, 2002
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        I can't imagine a cat allowing you to take the bp from the tail. Does
        the cat have to keep the tail still in order to give a proper reading?
        I would imagine it might hurt when the device is put on the tail?
        Tails are pretty sensitive and they are, after all, an extension of
        the spinal chord.

        Marcia


        --- In feline-heart@y..., arkrabs@a... wrote:
        > Are you generally seeing similar readings when taking bp from the
        arm and the
        > tail? If there is a difference, which tends to be higher and by
        how much?
        > We were told it was more accurate to use the arm, but the tail is
        so much
        > easier for us when we check it at home. Our regular vet used the
        tail too,
        > so I've never had a cat checked both ways for a comparison.
        > Thanks!
        > Sandy
        >
        > sallymerlin@y... a message dated 7/29/2002 12:20:42 PM Central
        > Daylight Time, foxfried@h... writes:
        > > she reads
        > > off
        > > > his arm and off his tail...(he had a HUGE difference once
        between
        > > the
        > > > two....we figured it was Dr. error, not cat wierdness)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • arkrabs@aol.com
        Actually, they sometimes barely notice when we we re putting the cuff on the tail. It s a regular Doppler unit like your doctor used to use so it s only
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 30, 2002
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          Actually, they sometimes barely notice when we we're putting the cuff on the
          tail. It's a regular Doppler unit like your doctor used to use so it's only
          uncomfortable for the short time you pump it up to get the reading. I
          usually lie on the couch w/ the kitty lying on my chest. When kitty's very
          relaxed, my husband takes the pressure. Yes, they have to be fairly still to
          get the bp - at least for us. <G>

          Sandy

          > message dated 7/30/2002 12:05:52 PM Central Daylight Time,
          > foxfried@... writes:
          > I can't imagine a cat allowing you to take the bp from the tail. Does the
          > cat have to keep the tail still in order to give a proper reading?
          > I would imagine it might hurt when the device is put on the tail?
          > Tails are pretty sensitive and they are, after all, an extension of
          > the spinal chord.
          >
          > Marcia
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • marcijoy2002
          My cats just don t like to have their tails touched, in general. Marcia ... cuff on the ... it s only ... reading. I ... kitty s very ... fairly still to ...
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 31, 2002
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            My cats just don't like to have their tails touched, in general.

            Marcia


            --- In feline-heart@y..., arkrabs@a... wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Actually, they sometimes barely notice when we we're putting the
            cuff on the
            > tail. It's a regular Doppler unit like your doctor used to use so
            it's only
            > uncomfortable for the short time you pump it up to get the
            reading. I
            > usually lie on the couch w/ the kitty lying on my chest. When
            kitty's very
            > relaxed, my husband takes the pressure. Yes, they have to be
            fairly still to
            > get the bp - at least for us. <G>
            >
            > Sandy
            >
            > > message dated 7/30/2002 12:05:52 PM Central Daylight Time,
            > > foxfried@h... writes:
            > > I can't imagine a cat allowing you to take the bp from the tail.
            Does the
            > > cat have to keep the tail still in order to give a proper reading?
            > > I would imagine it might hurt when the device is put on the tail?
            > > Tails are pretty sensitive and they are, after all, an extension
            of
            > > the spinal chord.
            > >
            > > Marcia
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • marcijoy2002
            My cats just don t like to have their tails touched, in general. Marcia ... cuff on the ... it s only ... reading. I ... kitty s very ... fairly still to ...
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 31, 2002
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              My cats just don't like to have their tails touched, in general.

              Marcia


              --- In feline-heart@y..., arkrabs@a... wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Actually, they sometimes barely notice when we we're putting the
              cuff on the
              > tail. It's a regular Doppler unit like your doctor used to use so
              it's only
              > uncomfortable for the short time you pump it up to get the
              reading. I
              > usually lie on the couch w/ the kitty lying on my chest. When
              kitty's very
              > relaxed, my husband takes the pressure. Yes, they have to be
              fairly still to
              > get the bp - at least for us. <G>
              >
              > Sandy
              >
              > > message dated 7/30/2002 12:05:52 PM Central Daylight Time,
              > > foxfried@h... writes:
              > > I can't imagine a cat allowing you to take the bp from the tail.
              Does the
              > > cat have to keep the tail still in order to give a proper reading?
              > > I would imagine it might hurt when the device is put on the tail?
              > > Tails are pretty sensitive and they are, after all, an extension
              of
              > > the spinal chord.
              > >
              > > Marcia
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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