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Vaccinations

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  • zellenesa
    Just catching up with this thread. I no longer vaccinate Widgie. If I had an outdoor cat, I would get the Purevax rabies vaccine, which does not contain the
    Message 1 of 12 , May 6, 2002
      Just catching up with this thread. I no longer vaccinate Widgie. If I
      had an outdoor cat, I would get the Purevax rabies vaccine, which
      does not contain the preservative believed to cause VAS in cats. The
      vet may have to special order it. Make sure the shot is given in a
      leg, not the scruff of the neck. There are many instances on the
      feline cancer list where a kitty had to have a leg amputated due to
      VAs...better a 3 legged cat than a dead one.

      My vet does not routinely give leukemia vaccs either. My Jubi is FIV+
      and already immune compromised and hasn't been vaccinated in years.
      If my vet insisted, I would ONLY give rabies because it's the law,
      though I would beg for the sick animal exemption.

      z
    • marcijoy2002
      Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you manage having an FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat. How do you keep the FIV+ cat from scratching, biting,
      Message 2 of 12 , May 6, 2002
        Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you manage having an
        FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat. How do you keep the FIV+ cat from
        scratching, biting, grooming the other cat? I sponsor an FIV+ cat at
        a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I don't want to
        infect my own cats, both of which already have other illnesses.


        Marcia and Morris


        --- In feline-heart@y..., "zellenesa" <zellene.sandler@p...> wrote:
        > Just catching up with this thread. I no longer vaccinate Widgie. If
        I
        > had an outdoor cat, I would get the Purevax rabies vaccine, which
        > does not contain the preservative believed to cause VAS in cats.
        The
        > vet may have to special order it. Make sure the shot is given in a
        > leg, not the scruff of the neck. There are many instances on the
        > feline cancer list where a kitty had to have a leg amputated due to
        > VAs...better a 3 legged cat than a dead one.
        >
        > My vet does not routinely give leukemia vaccs either. My Jubi is
        FIV+
        > and already immune compromised and hasn't been vaccinated in years.
        > If my vet insisted, I would ONLY give rabies because it's the law,
        > though I would beg for the sick animal exemption.
        >
        > z
      • Jonathan Rosenberg
        FIV is not easily transmitted among cats. So you don t need to worry about visiting/interacting an FIV+ cat & then being with your own cats. There is simply
        Message 3 of 12 , May 6, 2002
          FIV is not easily transmitted among cats. So you don't need to
          worry about visiting/interacting an FIV+ cat & then being with
          your own cats. There is simply no way that the disease can be
          transmitted in this manner.

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: marcijoy2002 [mailto:foxfried@...]
          > Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 11:57 AM
          > To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [FH] Re: FIV+ cat (off topic)
          >
          >
          > Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you
          > manage having an
          > FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat. How do you keep the
          > FIV+ cat from
          > scratching, biting, grooming the other cat? I sponsor
          > an FIV+ cat at
          > a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I
          > don't want to
          > infect my own cats, both of which already have other illnesses.
          >
          >
          > Marcia and Morris
          >
          >
          > --- In feline-heart@y..., "zellenesa"
          > <zellene.sandler@p...> wrote:
          > > Just catching up with this thread. I no longer
          > vaccinate Widgie. If
          > I
          > > had an outdoor cat, I would get the Purevax rabies
          > vaccine, which
          > > does not contain the preservative believed to cause
          > VAS in cats.
          > The
          > > vet may have to special order it. Make sure the shot
          > is given in a
          > > leg, not the scruff of the neck. There are many
          > instances on the
          > > feline cancer list where a kitty had to have a leg
          > amputated due to
          > > VAs...better a 3 legged cat than a dead one.
          > >
          > > My vet does not routinely give leukemia vaccs
          > either. My Jubi is
          > FIV+
          > > and already immune compromised and hasn't been
          > vaccinated in years.
          > > If my vet insisted, I would ONLY give rabies because
          > it's the law,
          > > though I would beg for the sick animal exemption.
          > >
          > > z
          >
          >
          > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > feline-heart-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
        • adawson1971@aol.com
          I wondered the same thing when I considered fostering cast from my local shelter. I found this description at:
          Message 4 of 12 , May 6, 2002
            I wondered the same thing when I considered fostering cast from my local shelter. I found this description at: http://www.healthypet.com/Library/cat_dog_health-1.html


            Common Health Problems: How do cats get Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)?

            Most cats become infected with FIV when they are bitten while fighting with an infected cat. The virus, present in the saliva of infected cats, passes beneath the skin of the victim when it is bitten. Once it is in the body, FIV infects cells, replicates, and spreads to new sites via blood vessels and lymph channels.

            Most FIV-positive cats have a history of cat fights and bite-wound abscesses. Considering that bites are the primary mode of transmission, it is not surprising that cats at greatest risk of FIV infection are outdoor, adult males, who are most likely to engage in aggressive fights over territory.

            A less common route of FIV transmission is from an infected mother cat (queen) to her kittens. Infection can occur in the uterus during pregnancy, through ingestion of virus-laden milk after birth or possibly as the kitten is delivered.

            Not all kittens born to FIV-positive cats become infected with the virus. The reasons for this are not well understood although it appears that several factors may be involved, such as the strain of FIV and the health status of the mother cat. One FIV-positive queen might have a litter with no infected kittens. In some cases, litters may include some kittens with FIV and some without. This is an area of active research, and there are still more questions than answers.

            Cats can also become infected with FIV if they receive FIV-positive blood or blood components in transfusions. However, the risk from blood transfusions has lessened considerable since reliable FIV diagnostic tests have become widely available. Today blood donor cats should be routinely screened for infectious agents.

            Sexual transmission of FIV is theoretically possible. However, the actual incidence of sexual transmission is unknown. This possibility can be greatly reduced by early neutering.

            FIV is rarely spread through casual contact (by sharing food and water bowls or litter pans, by airborne germs, or by mutual grooming). However, extremely sensitive, sophisticated tests have detected FIV proteins in some previously uninfected cats that had been living with positive cats for long periods. These "hidden" infections presumably occurred even though the cats did not fight. Although the affected cats had FIV proteins in their bodies, they did not test positive for FIV infection using routine blood tests and so far have not developed clinical signs of FIV infection. Therefore, the full implications of these observations are still unclear. However, casual FIV transmission must considered a possibility. (excerpt from The Cat AIDS Virus: What Every Cat Owner Should Know About Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) by Grady H. Shelton, DVM, Dipl. ABVP)

            In a message dated Mon, 6 May 2002 12:06:02 PM Eastern Daylight Time, "marcijoy2002" <foxfried@...> writes:

            >Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you manage having an
            >FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat.  How do you keep the FIV+ cat from
            >scratching, biting, grooming the other cat?  I sponsor an FIV+ cat at
            >a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I don't want to
            >infect my own cats, both of which already have other illnesses.
          • marcijoy2002
            The problem is that the shelter cats like to lick me and then my own cats like to lick me and also scratch me and sometimes bite me. I am also allergic to cats
            Message 5 of 12 , May 6, 2002
              The problem is that the shelter cats like to lick me and then my own
              cats like to lick me and also scratch me and sometimes bite me. I am
              also allergic to cats and I have a tendency to unconsciously scratch
              at my hives till I bleed. (And the hives would be at the spot where
              the saliva made contact with my skin.) Especially in a shelter where
              I am surrouded by cats. I am afraid the virus would enter one of my
              wounds when the cats licked me and I would become an FIV carrier.

              Marcia


              --- In feline-heart@y..., "Jonathan Rosenberg" <jr40@e...> wrote:
              > FIV is not easily transmitted among cats. So you don't need to
              > worry about visiting/interacting an FIV+ cat & then being with
              > your own cats. There is simply no way that the disease can be
              > transmitted in this manner.
              >
              > > -----Original Message-----
              > > From: marcijoy2002 [mailto:foxfried@h...]
              > > Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 11:57 AM
              > > To: feline-heart@y...
              > > Subject: [FH] Re: FIV+ cat (off topic)
              > >
              > >
              > > Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you
              > > manage having an
              > > FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat. How do you keep the
              > > FIV+ cat from
              > > scratching, biting, grooming the other cat? I sponsor
              > > an FIV+ cat at
              > > a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I
              > > don't want to
              > > infect my own cats, both of which already have other illnesses.
              > >
              > >
              > > Marcia and Morris
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In feline-heart@y..., "zellenesa"
              > > <zellene.sandler@p...> wrote:
              > > > Just catching up with this thread. I no longer
              > > vaccinate Widgie. If
              > > I
              > > > had an outdoor cat, I would get the Purevax rabies
              > > vaccine, which
              > > > does not contain the preservative believed to cause
              > > VAS in cats.
              > > The
              > > > vet may have to special order it. Make sure the shot
              > > is given in a
              > > > leg, not the scruff of the neck. There are many
              > > instances on the
              > > > feline cancer list where a kitty had to have a leg
              > > amputated due to
              > > > VAs...better a 3 legged cat than a dead one.
              > > >
              > > > My vet does not routinely give leukemia vaccs
              > > either. My Jubi is
              > > FIV+
              > > > and already immune compromised and hasn't been
              > > vaccinated in years.
              > > > If my vet insisted, I would ONLY give rabies because
              > > it's the law,
              > > > though I would beg for the sick animal exemption.
              > > >
              > > > z
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > >
              > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > > feline-heart-unsubscribe@y...
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > >
            • marcijoy2002
              Are there really cats that live together and do not fight, ever? Even play fight? I thought it was natural for cats in a household to play fight with each
              Message 6 of 12 , May 6, 2002
                Are there really cats that live together and do not fight, ever? Even
                play fight? I thought it was natural for cats in a household to play
                fight with each other, especially kittens. Morris and Tigger are
                usually very affectionate with each other, but sometimes they really
                go at it. Tigger has actually bitten permanent holes in Morris' ear.
                And they are both neutered male senior citizens, so there's no
                testosterone issue involved.

                Marcia


                --- In feline-heart@y..., adawson1971@a... wrote:
                > I wondered the same thing when I considered fostering cast from my
                local shelter. I found this description at:
                http://www.healthypet.com/Library/cat_dog_health-1.html
                >
                >
                > Common Health Problems: How do cats get Feline Immunodeficiency
                Virus (FIV)?
                >
                > Most cats become infected with FIV when they are bitten while
                fighting with an infected cat. The virus, present in the saliva of
                infected cats, passes beneath the skin of the victim when it is
                bitten. Once it is in the body, FIV infects cells, replicates, and
                spreads to new sites via blood vessels and lymph channels.
                >
                > Most FIV-positive cats have a history of cat fights and bite-wound
                abscesses. Considering that bites are the primary mode of
                transmission, it is not surprising that cats at greatest risk of FIV
                infection are outdoor, adult males, who are most likely to engage in
                aggressive fights over territory.
                >
                > A less common route of FIV transmission is from an infected mother
                cat (queen) to her kittens. Infection can occur in the uterus during
                pregnancy, through ingestion of virus-laden milk after birth or
                possibly as the kitten is delivered.
                >
                > Not all kittens born to FIV-positive cats become infected with the
                virus. The reasons for this are not well understood although it
                appears that several factors may be involved, such as the strain of
                FIV and the health status of the mother cat. One FIV-positive queen
                might have a litter with no infected kittens. In some cases, litters
                may include some kittens with FIV and some without. This is an area
                of active research, and there are still more questions than answers.
                >
                > Cats can also become infected with FIV if they receive FIV-positive
                blood or blood components in transfusions. However, the risk from
                blood transfusions has lessened considerable since reliable FIV
                diagnostic tests have become widely available. Today blood donor cats
                should be routinely screened for infectious agents.
                >
                > Sexual transmission of FIV is theoretically possible. However, the
                actual incidence of sexual transmission is unknown. This possibility
                can be greatly reduced by early neutering.
                >
                > FIV is rarely spread through casual contact (by sharing food and
                water bowls or litter pans, by airborne germs, or by mutual
                grooming). However, extremely sensitive, sophisticated tests have
                detected FIV proteins in some previously uninfected cats that had
                been living with positive cats for long periods. These "hidden"
                infections presumably occurred even though the cats did not fight.
                Although the affected cats had FIV proteins in their bodies, they did
                not test positive for FIV infection using routine blood tests and so
                far have not developed clinical signs of FIV infection. Therefore,
                the full implications of these observations are still unclear.
                However, casual FIV transmission must considered a possibility.
                (excerpt from The Cat AIDS Virus: What Every Cat Owner Should Know
                About Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) by Grady H. Shelton, DVM,
                Dipl. ABVP)
                >
                > In a message dated Mon, 6 May 2002 12:06:02 PM Eastern Daylight
                Time, "marcijoy2002" <foxfried@h...> writes:
                >
                > >Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you manage having
                an
                > >FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat.  How do you keep the FIV+ cat
                from
                > >scratching, biting, grooming the other cat?  I sponsor an FIV+ cat
                at
                > >a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I don't want to
                > >infect my own cats, both of which already have other illnesses.
              • Jonathan Rosenberg
                Humans cannot carry FIV. It is specific to domestic cats.
                Message 7 of 12 , May 6, 2002
                  Humans cannot carry FIV. It is specific to domestic cats.

                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: marcijoy2002 [mailto:foxfried@...]
                  > Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 1:40 PM
                  > To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [FH] Re: FIV+ cat (off topic)
                  >
                  >
                  > The problem is that the shelter cats like to lick me
                  > and then my own
                  > cats like to lick me and also scratch me and sometimes
                  > bite me. I am
                  > also allergic to cats and I have a tendency to
                  > unconsciously scratch
                  > at my hives till I bleed. (And the hives would be at
                  > the spot where
                  > the saliva made contact with my skin.) Especially in a
                  > shelter where
                  > I am surrouded by cats. I am afraid the virus would
                  > enter one of my
                  > wounds when the cats licked me and I would become an
                  > FIV carrier.
                  >
                  > Marcia
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In feline-heart@y..., "Jonathan Rosenberg"
                  > <jr40@e...> wrote:
                  > > FIV is not easily transmitted among cats. So you
                  > don't need to
                  > > worry about visiting/interacting an FIV+ cat & then
                  > being with
                  > > your own cats. There is simply no way that the
                  > disease can be
                  > > transmitted in this manner.
                  > >
                  > > > -----Original Message-----
                  > > > From: marcijoy2002 [mailto:foxfried@h...]
                  > > > Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 11:57 AM
                  > > > To: feline-heart@y...
                  > > > Subject: [FH] Re: FIV+ cat (off topic)
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you
                  > > > manage having an
                  > > > FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat. How do you keep the
                  > > > FIV+ cat from
                  > > > scratching, biting, grooming the other cat? I sponsor
                  > > > an FIV+ cat at
                  > > > a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I
                  > > > don't want to
                  > > > infect my own cats, both of which already have
                  > other illnesses.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Marcia and Morris
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In feline-heart@y..., "zellenesa"
                  > > > <zellene.sandler@p...> wrote:
                  > > > > Just catching up with this thread. I no longer
                  > > > vaccinate Widgie. If
                  > > > I
                  > > > > had an outdoor cat, I would get the Purevax rabies
                  > > > vaccine, which
                  > > > > does not contain the preservative believed to cause
                  > > > VAS in cats.
                  > > > The
                  > > > > vet may have to special order it. Make sure the shot
                  > > > is given in a
                  > > > > leg, not the scruff of the neck. There are many
                  > > > instances on the
                  > > > > feline cancer list where a kitty had to have a leg
                  > > > amputated due to
                  > > > > VAs...better a 3 legged cat than a dead one.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > My vet does not routinely give leukemia vaccs
                  > > > either. My Jubi is
                  > > > FIV+
                  > > > > and already immune compromised and hasn't been
                  > > > vaccinated in years.
                  > > > > If my vet insisted, I would ONLY give rabies because
                  > > > it's the law,
                  > > > > though I would beg for the sick animal exemption.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > z
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                  > > >
                  > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > > > feline-heart-unsubscribe@y...
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > feline-heart-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                • Mike & Linda Irrgang
                  max and pum are like children...the playtime sometimes degenerates a bit...but not always fortunately...and later they are sleeping together all curled up!
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 13, 2002
                    max and pum are like children...the playtime sometimes degenerates a
                    bit...but not always fortunately...and later they are sleeping together all
                    curled up!

                    linda

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: marcijoy2002 [mailto:foxfried@...]
                    Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 12:49 PM
                    To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [FH] Re: FIV+ cat (off topic)


                    Are there really cats that live together and do not fight, ever? Even
                    play fight? I thought it was natural for cats in a household to play
                    fight with each other, especially kittens. Morris and Tigger are
                    usually very affectionate with each other, but sometimes they really
                    go at it. Tigger has actually bitten permanent holes in Morris' ear.
                    And they are both neutered male senior citizens, so there's no
                    testosterone issue involved.

                    Marcia


                    --- In feline-heart@y..., adawson1971@a... wrote:
                    > I wondered the same thing when I considered fostering cast from my
                    local shelter. I found this description at:
                    http://www.healthypet.com/Library/cat_dog_health-1.html
                    >
                    >
                    > Common Health Problems: How do cats get Feline Immunodeficiency
                    Virus (FIV)?
                    >
                    > Most cats become infected with FIV when they are bitten while
                    fighting with an infected cat. The virus, present in the saliva of
                    infected cats, passes beneath the skin of the victim when it is
                    bitten. Once it is in the body, FIV infects cells, replicates, and
                    spreads to new sites via blood vessels and lymph channels.
                    >
                    > Most FIV-positive cats have a history of cat fights and bite-wound
                    abscesses. Considering that bites are the primary mode of
                    transmission, it is not surprising that cats at greatest risk of FIV
                    infection are outdoor, adult males, who are most likely to engage in
                    aggressive fights over territory.
                    >
                    > A less common route of FIV transmission is from an infected mother
                    cat (queen) to her kittens. Infection can occur in the uterus during
                    pregnancy, through ingestion of virus-laden milk after birth or
                    possibly as the kitten is delivered.
                    >
                    > Not all kittens born to FIV-positive cats become infected with the
                    virus. The reasons for this are not well understood although it
                    appears that several factors may be involved, such as the strain of
                    FIV and the health status of the mother cat. One FIV-positive queen
                    might have a litter with no infected kittens. In some cases, litters
                    may include some kittens with FIV and some without. This is an area
                    of active research, and there are still more questions than answers.
                    >
                    > Cats can also become infected with FIV if they receive FIV-positive
                    blood or blood components in transfusions. However, the risk from
                    blood transfusions has lessened considerable since reliable FIV
                    diagnostic tests have become widely available. Today blood donor cats
                    should be routinely screened for infectious agents.
                    >
                    > Sexual transmission of FIV is theoretically possible. However, the
                    actual incidence of sexual transmission is unknown. This possibility
                    can be greatly reduced by early neutering.
                    >
                    > FIV is rarely spread through casual contact (by sharing food and
                    water bowls or litter pans, by airborne germs, or by mutual
                    grooming). However, extremely sensitive, sophisticated tests have
                    detected FIV proteins in some previously uninfected cats that had
                    been living with positive cats for long periods. These "hidden"
                    infections presumably occurred even though the cats did not fight.
                    Although the affected cats had FIV proteins in their bodies, they did
                    not test positive for FIV infection using routine blood tests and so
                    far have not developed clinical signs of FIV infection. Therefore,
                    the full implications of these observations are still unclear.
                    However, casual FIV transmission must considered a possibility.
                    (excerpt from The Cat AIDS Virus: What Every Cat Owner Should Know
                    About Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) by Grady H. Shelton, DVM,
                    Dipl. ABVP)
                    >
                    > In a message dated Mon, 6 May 2002 12:06:02 PM Eastern Daylight
                    Time, "marcijoy2002" <foxfried@h...> writes:
                    >
                    > >Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how you manage having
                    an
                    > >FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat.  How do you keep the FIV+ cat
                    from
                    > >scratching, biting, grooming the other cat?  I sponsor an FIV+ cat
                    at
                    > >a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I don't want to
                    > >infect my own cats, both of which already have other illnesses.



                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    feline-heart-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  • Susan
                    Have you tryed Feliway? It is cat facial pheneromes and calms them. The vet on Ask E-Vet recommended it for males who fight when they see a strange cat out of
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 13, 2002
                      Have you tryed Feliway? It is cat facial pheneromes
                      and calms them. The vet on Ask E-Vet recommended it
                      for males who fight when they see a strange cat out of
                      the window.


                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: marcijoy2002 [mailto:foxfried@...]
                      > Sent: Monday, May 06, 2002 12:49 PM
                      > To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [FH] Re: FIV+ cat (off topic)
                      >
                      >
                      > Are there really cats that live together and do not
                      > fight, ever? Even
                      > play fight? I thought it was natural for cats in a
                      > household to play
                      > fight with each other, especially kittens. Morris
                      > and Tigger are
                      > usually very affectionate with each other, but
                      > sometimes they really
                      > go at it. Tigger has actually bitten permanent
                      > holes in Morris' ear.
                      > And they are both neutered male senior citizens, so
                      > there's no
                      > testosterone issue involved.
                      >
                      > Marcia
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In feline-heart@y..., adawson1971@a... wrote:
                      > > I wondered the same thing when I considered
                      > fostering cast from my
                      > local shelter. I found this description at:
                      >
                      http://www.healthypet.com/Library/cat_dog_health-1.html
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Common Health Problems: How do cats get Feline
                      > Immunodeficiency
                      > Virus (FIV)?
                      > >
                      > > Most cats become infected with FIV when they are
                      > bitten while
                      > fighting with an infected cat. The virus, present in
                      > the saliva of
                      > infected cats, passes beneath the skin of the victim
                      > when it is
                      > bitten. Once it is in the body, FIV infects cells,
                      > replicates, and
                      > spreads to new sites via blood vessels and lymph
                      > channels.
                      > >
                      > > Most FIV-positive cats have a history of cat
                      > fights and bite-wound
                      > abscesses. Considering that bites are the primary
                      > mode of
                      > transmission, it is not surprising that cats at
                      > greatest risk of FIV
                      > infection are outdoor, adult males, who are most
                      > likely to engage in
                      > aggressive fights over territory.
                      > >
                      > > A less common route of FIV transmission is from an
                      > infected mother
                      > cat (queen) to her kittens. Infection can occur in
                      > the uterus during
                      > pregnancy, through ingestion of virus-laden milk
                      > after birth or
                      > possibly as the kitten is delivered.
                      > >
                      > > Not all kittens born to FIV-positive cats become
                      > infected with the
                      > virus. The reasons for this are not well understood
                      > although it
                      > appears that several factors may be involved, such
                      > as the strain of
                      > FIV and the health status of the mother cat. One
                      > FIV-positive queen
                      > might have a litter with no infected kittens. In
                      > some cases, litters
                      > may include some kittens with FIV and some without.
                      > This is an area
                      > of active research, and there are still more
                      > questions than answers.
                      > >
                      > > Cats can also become infected with FIV if they
                      > receive FIV-positive
                      > blood or blood components in transfusions. However,
                      > the risk from
                      > blood transfusions has lessened considerable since
                      > reliable FIV
                      > diagnostic tests have become widely available. Today
                      > blood donor cats
                      > should be routinely screened for infectious agents.
                      > >
                      > > Sexual transmission of FIV is theoretically
                      > possible. However, the
                      > actual incidence of sexual transmission is unknown.
                      > This possibility
                      > can be greatly reduced by early neutering.
                      > >
                      > > FIV is rarely spread through casual contact (by
                      > sharing food and
                      > water bowls or litter pans, by airborne germs, or by
                      > mutual
                      > grooming). However, extremely sensitive,
                      > sophisticated tests have
                      > detected FIV proteins in some previously uninfected
                      > cats that had
                      > been living with positive cats for long periods.
                      > These "hidden"
                      > infections presumably occurred even though the cats
                      > did not fight.
                      > Although the affected cats had FIV proteins in their
                      > bodies, they did
                      > not test positive for FIV infection using routine
                      > blood tests and so
                      > far have not developed clinical signs of FIV
                      > infection. Therefore,
                      > the full implications of these observations are
                      > still unclear.
                      > However, casual FIV transmission must considered a
                      > possibility.
                      > (excerpt from The Cat AIDS Virus: What Every Cat
                      > Owner Should Know
                      > About Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) by Grady
                      > H. Shelton, DVM,
                      > Dipl. ABVP)
                      > >
                      > > In a message dated Mon, 6 May 2002 12:06:02 PM
                      > Eastern Daylight
                      > Time, "marcijoy2002" <foxfried@h...> writes:
                      > >
                      > > >Sorry for going off topic, but I am curious how
                      > you manage having
                      > an
                      > > >FIV+ cat along with an FIV- cat. �How do you keep
                      > the FIV+ cat
                      > from
                      > > >scratching, biting, grooming the other cat? �I
                      > sponsor an FIV+ cat
                      > at
                      > > >a shelter, but I am afraid to visit him because I
                      > don't want to
                      > > >infect my own cats, both of which already have
                      > other illnesses.
                      >
                      >
                      >
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                    • marthe horn-Davis
                      Hi, Thank you for the information about vaccinations..It certainly is food for thought. Certainly the possibility of vaccinations being harmful should be
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 30, 2005
                        Hi,

                        Thank you for the information about vaccinations..It certainly is food for thought.

                        Certainly the possibility of vaccinations being harmful should be considered as well as the fact that they are designed to prevent disease. The whole disease thing is baffling since vaccines provide some protection and much has to do with the animals' previous exposure in certain diseases. Kittens I understand are most vulnerable.

                        My only experience was with my cat, Gina, who got a lump at the vaccination site after vaccinations in December 2004. (I made sure to have her vaccinated since I was worried when my other cat Rocky - he passed away from heart failure -might have had a feline virus when he got so sick both cats were up to date but as a precaution) I called my vet and was told that the lump should go away on its own but could be malignant and in that case should be removed. It is a catch 52 type of thing. The disease is bad, but do the benefits of vaccination outweigh its disadvantages? The only information that I have heard here and there and I am not sure if its viable has to do with perhaps the frequency of vaccinations...When I had my Rocky at emergency (earlier HMC) and they were trying to rule out what was wrong, I mentioned that his vaccinations were up to date yearly, and the vet there said something like every 3 years was enough. I have heard this a number of times. I don't know what
                        the answer is and how often is really necessary/beneficial/harmful. When I had Lenny (kitten) boostered, (3 sets including 1 rabies) the subject came up in my discussion with Animlalert where I got him and again controversy of how often after the boosters are done should a cat be vaccinated. We talked a bit about the possibility of saratomas from vaccinations. I would certainly never discourage someone to have the vaccinations for their pet, its the responsible thing to do but because I don't have the answers I hope some are found by qualified persons so that our animals receive the best care. Of course if many different animals from different sources are integrated like in a cat shelter or animal rescue situation, it makes sense to be cautious...and have vaccinations often. Vaccinations are not always a preventative and certainly never a cure...they do serve a purpose but I guess like everything we need an open mind. The lump on the vaccination site (size of a marble) did
                        finally go but it was there for about a month and I worried..then it suddenly dissolved.



                        M



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                      • Sue at MAGDRL
                        Saturday I attended Broadway Barks - an annual event that supports groups that help homeless pets. This year I met the author of a book on vaccinations. The
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jul 16, 2007
                          Saturday I attended Broadway Barks - an annual event that supports groups that help homeless pets.

                          This year I met the author of a book on vaccinations. The book is Stop The Shots by John Clifton. It's a short book that gives a good explanation on vaccinations and what they do and don't do for our pets. It's short, easy to read and doesn't sensationalize the problems. The web site & book cover look pretty dramatic, but the information is good.

                          http://www.stoptheshots.com/



                          Sue & Angel Pepper


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                        • moonpye
                          Hi Sue, I saw Mary Tyler Moore speaking about Broadway Barks when I was passing by the view... She brought on some young dogs that were up for adoption and a
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jul 16, 2007
                            Hi Sue,

                            I saw Mary Tyler Moore speaking about Broadway Barks when I was passing by
                            the view... She brought on some young dogs that were up for adoption and a
                            10 year old white dog who was just precious.. When they came back from
                            commercial the 10 year old dog was already adopted by a mother and daughter
                            in the audience. It was the best!

                            Hugs,
                            Candace


                            On 7/16/07, Sue at MAGDRL <susan@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Saturday I attended Broadway Barks - an annual event that supports groups
                            > that help homeless pets.
                            >
                            >
                            > Sue & Angel Pepper
                            >
                            >
                            >


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