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If your cat won't eat.

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  • marcijoy2002
    I copied the following from the feline diabetes board. I cut out some stuff that pertains only to feline diabetes. I think it should be helpful to some of
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2002
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      I copied the following from the feline diabetes board. I cut out some
      stuff that pertains only to feline diabetes. I think it should be
      helpful to some of you:


      I can't get my cat to eat! What should I do?

      First, you need to verify whether your cat will eat absolutely
      nothing, or just won't eat the food that you've offered. Try a
      variety of tempting dishes. Your cat may be suffering from a poor
      sense of smell, so dishes which are very fragrant (such as tuna or
      liver), or heated up, may excite some interest. Alternatively, your
      cat may prefer something bland like Hill's A/D (a prescription food)
      or baby food (meat flavors are best; make sure there are no onions or
      garlic added). Sometimes, a cat will not eat from a dish but will
      eat from your hand. Although eventually you need to feed your cat
      the most healthful diet, getting food into your cat is the most
      important thing in this situation, so feed whatever he'll eat.

      If your cat won't eat anything at all, contact your vet. Persistent
      lack of appetite can result from a variety of causes, including
      respiratory or urinary tract infection, pancreatitis, hepatic
      lipidosis, or even more serious conditions. Be alert for vomiting or
      signs of nausea (such as excessive salivating or lip-licking.)
      Your vet may recommend syringe-feeding. Sometimes, if you put some
      food in the cat's mouth by hand (behind the teeth is fine), this will
      be enough to jump-start his appetite a little. If this doesn't work,
      buy an oral syringe (usually in the baby supplies at the grocery or
      pharmacy). Dilute a smooth food such as baby food with a little
      water and put it into the syringe (it may help to pack it from the
      top and shake it down). Put the syringe in his mouth, sideways,
      behind her back teeth, and slowly deliver the food (give him time to
      swallow!). Give the cat as much as he will eat, but don't force too
      much, because he may not be able to tolerate more than a tablespoon
      or so of food at a time. Many small feedings may be necessary. If
      all else fails, your vet may need to prescribe appetite stimulants or
      even install a feeding tube (in the case of hepatic lipidosis).

      Marcia and Morris
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