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A few questions

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  • marcijoy2002
    Hello everyone. I ve been reading the posts and learning a lot. Here are some questions I have: 1. How long does it take the diltiazem to take effect. I just
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 29 6:00 AM
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      Hello everyone. I've been reading the posts and learning a lot.

      Here are some questions I have:

      1. How long does it take the diltiazem to take effect. I just started
      it last night, and already Morris seems to be perking up. But I'm
      thinking that is perhaps just him recovering from the stress of the
      echocardiogram from Monday.

      2. Do any of you have heart problems yourself? I'm wondering if
      anyone can provide some subjective descriptions, so we can understand
      better how are kitties are feeling. I have asthma and anemia myself,
      so I can relate to breathing difficulties and having low carbon
      monoxide diffusion levels, but my heart is just fine. My dad has high
      blood pressure and had a triple bypass a little over a year ago. He
      is on lasix himself. Perhaps he can give me some insight. (I wish
      Morris could get a bypass, rather than just suffer with a weak heart.)

      2. I'm already trying to keep track of Morris' pulse and respiration
      rate, so if anything is out of the ordinary I can whisk him to the
      vet before things get out of hand. Is it also possible to use those
      home blood pressure monitors on a cat? What about those fetal
      stethoscopes that pregnant women use? Could I use something like that
      to check on Morris' heart and lung sounds?

      3. How much do you guys usually pay for an echocardiogram? I'm asking
      because I've noticed a couple of you saying that you could not afford
      one. I don't mean to offend anyone by this, and I realize that I
      don't know your financial situations or what kind of money troubles
      you are having. But Morris' echo only cost $275, which included a
      technician coming to my regular vet's office, and an interpretation
      by a cardiologist at the animal medical center in New York. Were it
      not for the echo, we would not have known that he had cardiomyopathy.
      Now, $275 is not exactly cheap, but it would have been much more
      expensive if I had not got the echo, not started treatment because I
      didn't know he had a heart problem (vet originally thought it was
      just allergies; I am the one who insisted on a chest x-ray which
      eventually led to the echo and the diagnosis), then one day came home
      and found Morris collapsed and unable to breathe and had to rush him
      to the hospital for critical care. Like they say, an ounce of
      prevention is worth a pound of cure. Once again, I do not mean to
      offend anyone and am sorry if I am starting off on the wrong foot
      here, but I am curious. Am I getting an exceptionally good deal?

      Marci
    • diane
      Marci, We also pay around $275 for an ultrasound and I think you ll find that s at the high end of the spectrum Diane
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 29 2:08 PM
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        Marci,

        We also pay around $275 for an ultrasound and I think you'll find
        that's at the high end of the spectrum <sigh>


        Diane


        >
        >3. How much do you guys usually pay for an echocardiogram? I'm asking
        >because I've noticed a couple of you saying that you could not afford
        >one. I don't mean to offend anyone by this, and I realize that I
        >don't know your financial situations or what kind of money troubles
        >you are having. But Morris' echo only cost $275, which included a
        >technician coming to my regular vet's office, and an interpretation
        >by a cardiologist at the animal medical center in New York. Were it
        >not for the echo, we would not have known that he had cardiomyopathy.
        >Now, $275 is not exactly cheap, but it would have been much more
        >expensive if I had not got the echo, not started treatment because I
        >didn't know he had a heart problem (vet originally thought it was
        >just allergies; I am the one who insisted on a chest x-ray which
        >eventually led to the echo and the diagnosis), then one day came home
        >and found Morris collapsed and unable to breathe and had to rush him
        >to the hospital for critical care. Like they say, an ounce of
        >prevention is worth a pound of cure. Once again, I do not mean to
        >offend anyone and am sorry if I am starting off on the wrong foot
        >here, but I am curious. Am I getting an exceptionally good deal?
        >
        >Marci
        >
        >
        >
        >________________________________________________________________________
        >________________________________________________________________________
        >
        >Message: 23
        >
      • Debbie Graham
        I pay $170 for the ultrasound, so yes I would say $275 is pretty high. Debbie diane wrote: Marci, We also pay around $275 for an
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 29 3:12 PM
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          I pay $170 for the ultrasound, so yes I would say $275 is pretty high.
          Debbie
          diane <diane@...> wrote: Marci,

          We also pay around $275 for an ultrasound and I think you'll find
          that's at the high end of the spectrum <sigh>


          Diane


          >
          >3. How much do you guys usually pay for an echocardiogram? I'm asking
          >because I've noticed a couple of you saying that you could not afford
          >one. I don't mean to offend anyone by this, and I realize that I
          >don't know your financial situations or what kind of money troubles
          >you are having. But Morris' echo only cost $275, which included


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        • gussielou49
          Our regular vet charges $310, however we are scheduled to go to a cardiologist in Boston next week and they charge $190-260 (not sure why the range). Gus is on
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 29 3:46 PM
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            Our regular vet charges $310, however we are scheduled to go to a
            cardiologist in Boston next week and they charge $190-260 (not sure
            why the range).

            Gus is on diltiazem and has been for 1 1/2 months. Last week our vet
            took his heart rate and said it was MUCH lower than previous (160
            from 200) and thinks the meds. are working. He's also on enalapril.
            I've heard a lot of good things about it. We are getting a 2nd
            opinion from a cardiologist just to be sure he's on the right meds,
            etc. Plus we have lots of questions.

            I was wondering about that stethoscope thing myself, so if you find
            out please post it! I thought of getting one, too.

            Good luck & keep us posted.

            Steph & Gus

            --- In feline-heart@y..., "marcijoy2002" <foxfried@h...> wrote:
            > Hello everyone. I've been reading the posts and learning a lot.
            >
            > Here are some questions I have:
            >
            > 1. How long does it take the diltiazem to take effect. I just
            started
            > it last night, and already Morris seems to be perking up. But I'm
            > thinking that is perhaps just him recovering from the stress of the
            > echocardiogram from Monday.
            >
            > 2. Do any of you have heart problems yourself? I'm wondering if
            > anyone can provide some subjective descriptions, so we can
            understand
            > better how are kitties are feeling. I have asthma and anemia
            myself,
            > so I can relate to breathing difficulties and having low carbon
            > monoxide diffusion levels, but my heart is just fine. My dad has
            high
            > blood pressure and had a triple bypass a little over a year ago. He
            > is on lasix himself. Perhaps he can give me some insight. (I wish
            > Morris could get a bypass, rather than just suffer with a weak
            heart.)
            >
            > 2. I'm already trying to keep track of Morris' pulse and
            respiration
            > rate, so if anything is out of the ordinary I can whisk him to the
            > vet before things get out of hand. Is it also possible to use those
            > home blood pressure monitors on a cat? What about those fetal
            > stethoscopes that pregnant women use? Could I use something like
            that
            > to check on Morris' heart and lung sounds?
            >
            > 3. How much do you guys usually pay for an echocardiogram? I'm
            asking
            > because I've noticed a couple of you saying that you could not
            afford
            > one. I don't mean to offend anyone by this, and I realize that I
            > don't know your financial situations or what kind of money troubles
            > you are having. But Morris' echo only cost $275, which included a
            > technician coming to my regular vet's office, and an interpretation
            > by a cardiologist at the animal medical center in New York. Were it
            > not for the echo, we would not have known that he had
            cardiomyopathy.
            > Now, $275 is not exactly cheap, but it would have been much more
            > expensive if I had not got the echo, not started treatment because
            I
            > didn't know he had a heart problem (vet originally thought it was
            > just allergies; I am the one who insisted on a chest x-ray which
            > eventually led to the echo and the diagnosis), then one day came
            home
            > and found Morris collapsed and unable to breathe and had to rush
            him
            > to the hospital for critical care. Like they say, an ounce of
            > prevention is worth a pound of cure. Once again, I do not mean to
            > offend anyone and am sorry if I am starting off on the wrong foot
            > here, but I am curious. Am I getting an exceptionally good deal?
            >
            > Marci
          • sallymerlin
            Where I live the problem is finding a place who can do it. Up until a year and a half ago there was ONE veterinary cardiologist using ultrasound in the entire
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 30 7:46 AM
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              Where I live the problem is finding a place who can do it. Up until a
              year and a half ago there was ONE veterinary cardiologist using
              ultrasound in the entire state of Vermont!!! My wonderful vets
              recognised the need for more choices and so they invested in the
              equipment and training. The scan/proceedure itself costs about $115
              but they then send the scans off to a feline cardiologist for
              review/consult and that is an additional $50. It is a fair amount of
              dollars for the area's income level, but not impossible. And my vet
              will take payments, which eases the burden. Most vets will if you
              ask...they realise that you will come back to them if they are nice to
              you.

              Sally

              --- In feline-heart@y..., diane <diane@m...> wrote:
              > Marci,
              >
              > We also pay around $275 for an ultrasound and I think you'll find
              > that's at the high end of the spectrum <sigh>
              >
              >
              > Diane
              >
              >
              > >
              > >3. How much do you guys usually pay for an echocardiogram? I'm
              asking
              > >because I've noticed a couple of you saying that you could not
              afford
              > >one. I don't mean to offend anyone by this, and I realize that I
              > >don't know your financial situations or what kind of money troubles
              > >you are having. But Morris' echo only cost $275, which included a
              > >technician coming to my regular vet's office, and an interpretation
              > >by a cardiologist at the animal medical center in New York. Were it
              > >not for the echo, we would not have known that he had
              cardiomyopathy.
              > >Now, $275 is not exactly cheap, but it would have been much more
              > >expensive if I had not got the echo, not started treatment because
              I
              > >didn't know he had a heart problem (vet originally thought it was
              > >just allergies; I am the one who insisted on a chest x-ray which
              > >eventually led to the echo and the diagnosis), then one day came
              home
              > >and found Morris collapsed and unable to breathe and had to rush
              him
              > >to the hospital for critical care. Like they say, an ounce of
              > >prevention is worth a pound of cure. Once again, I do not mean to
              > >offend anyone and am sorry if I am starting off on the wrong foot
              > >here, but I am curious. Am I getting an exceptionally good deal?
              > >
              > >Marci
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >_____________________________________________________________________
              ___
              >
              >_____________________________________________________________________
              ___
              > >
              > >Message: 23
              > >
            • janice zimmer
              Wanted to check on some things to make life easier on Kirby. 1. The vet s instructions were to give his meds in the AM preferably. Does anyone know why?
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 23, 2003
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                Wanted to check on some things to make life easier on Kirby.

                1. The vet's instructions were to give his meds in the AM preferably. Does anyone know why? Would it be ok to give in the evening?

                2. The vet also said to try to treat Kirby right after giving the meds - but he is not one for much people food or cat treats. He does like regular tuna - not cat food.
                Is tuna ok for cats in small doses - like a few bites? Someone had told me that tuna is not good for cats.

                3. How do I know if Kirby needs more lasix than he is getting? His breathing seems to be about the same as it was - just curious. I want to make sure we are medicating to make him as comfortable as he can be.

                Thanks for everyone who has e-mailed. I am trying to get past being so upset. It's hard talking to people about it, though.

                Are there any other pointers I need to know?

                Thanks,
                Janice

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • pegfrench6
                Dear janice, It would probably be okay to give them in the evening. I gave Torrie s hers then. His thinking may be that when they reach their half life that it
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 23, 2003
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                  Dear janice,
                  It would probably be okay to give them in the evening. I gave
                  Torrie's hers then. His thinking may be that when they reach their
                  half life that it would be towards evening when everything was
                  winding down, for instance heart medicine would be at full strength
                  in the day when there is activity and tapering off at night when
                  sleeping. I'm afraid I put that badly. I hope you get the idea.
                  Tuna is okay in small doses. The problem is that human tinned tuna
                  has some mercury in them. But it would take alot of feedings to be of
                  concern. The important thing is that kitty eats and associates
                  medicating with something positive. I hope this helps. Peg and Torrie
                  Angel
                  > 1. The vet's instructions were to give his meds in the AM
                  preferably. Does anyone know why? Would it be ok to give in the
                  evening?
                  >
                  > 2. The vet also said to try to treat Kirby right after giving the
                  meds - but he is not one for much people food or cat treats. He
                  does like regular tuna - not cat food.
                  > Is tuna ok for cats in small doses - like a few bites? Someone had
                  told me that tuna is not good for cats.
                  >
                  > 3. How do I know if Kirby needs more lasix than he is getting?
                  His breathing seems to be about the same as it was - just curious. I
                  want to make sure we are medicating to make him as comfortable as he
                  can be.
                  >
                  > Thanks for everyone who has e-mailed. I am trying to get past
                  being so upset. It's hard talking to people about it, though.
                  >
                  > Are there any other pointers I need to know?
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  > Janice
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • WENDY LAMB
                  I think Peg hit it right on. My cardiologist started to say give Tiger his pill in the evening,then decided am would be better since he would be most active
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 24, 2003
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                    I think Peg hit it right on. My cardiologist started to say give Tiger his pill in the evening,then decided am would be better since he would be most active during the day.

                    Wendy and Tiger

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: pegfrench6
                    Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2003 6:04 PM
                    To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [FH] Re: A few questions

                    Dear janice,
                    It would probably be okay to give them in the evening. I gave
                    Torrie's hers then. His thinking may be that when they reach their
                    half life that it would be towards evening when everything was
                    winding down, for instance heart medicine would be at full strength
                    in the day when there is activity and tapering off at night when
                    sleeping. I'm afraid I put that badly. I hope you get the idea.
                    Tuna is okay in small doses. The problem is that human tinned tuna
                    has some mercury in them. But it would take alot of feedings to be of
                    concern. The important thing is that kitty eats and associates
                    medicating with something positive. I hope this helps. Peg and Torrie
                    Angel
                    > 1. The vet's instructions were to give his meds in the AM
                    preferably. Does anyone know why? Would it be ok to give in the
                    evening?
                    >
                    > 2. The vet also said to try to treat Kirby right after giving the
                    meds - but he is not one for much people food or cat treats. He
                    does like regular tuna - not cat food.
                    > Is tuna ok for cats in small doses - like a few bites? Someone had
                    told me that tuna is not good for cats.
                    >
                    > 3. How do I know if Kirby needs more lasix than he is getting?
                    His breathing seems to be about the same as it was - just curious. I
                    want to make sure we are medicating to make him as comfortable as he
                    can be.
                    >
                    > Thanks for everyone who has e-mailed. I am trying to get past
                    being so upset. It's hard talking to people about it, though.
                    >
                    > Are there any other pointers I need to know?
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > Janice
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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                  • Gretchen Flanley
                    By the way, cats are nocturnal, so they are typically more active at night... of course, active for a cat is a relative thing. Also, cats may sleep during
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jul 31, 2003
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                      By the way, cats are nocturnal, so they are typically more active at night... of course, "active" for a cat is a relative thing. Also, cats may sleep during the day because their owners are at work, etc., so they have even more energy when their owners come home - ready to play!

                      WENDY LAMB <renaissanceragdolls@...> wrote:I think Peg hit it right on. My cardiologist started to say give Tiger his pill in the evening,then decided am would be better since he would be most active during the day.

                      Wendy and Tiger

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: pegfrench6
                      Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2003 6:04 PM
                      To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [FH] Re: A few questions

                      Dear janice,
                      It would probably be okay to give them in the evening. I gave
                      Torrie's hers then. His thinking may be that when they reach their
                      half life that it would be towards evening when everything was
                      winding down, for instance heart medicine would be at full strength
                      in the day when there is activity and tapering off at night when
                      sleeping. I'm afraid I put that badly. I hope you get the idea.
                      Tuna is okay in small doses. The problem is that human tinned tuna
                      has some mercury in them. But it would take alot of feedings to be of
                      concern. The important thing is that kitty eats and associates
                      medicating with something positive. I hope this helps. Peg and Torrie
                      Angel
                      > 1. The vet's instructions were to give his meds in the AM
                      preferably. Does anyone know why? Would it be ok to give in the
                      evening?
                      >
                      > 2. The vet also said to try to treat Kirby right after giving the
                      meds - but he is not one for much people food or cat treats. He
                      does like regular tuna - not cat food.
                      > Is tuna ok for cats in small doses - like a few bites? Someone had
                      told me that tuna is not good for cats.
                      >
                      > 3. How do I know if Kirby needs more lasix than he is getting?
                      His breathing seems to be about the same as it was - just curious. I
                      want to make sure we are medicating to make him as comfortable as he
                      can be.
                      >
                      > Thanks for everyone who has e-mailed. I am trying to get past
                      being so upset. It's hard talking to people about it, though.
                      >
                      > Are there any other pointers I need to know?
                      >
                      > Thanks,
                      > Janice
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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