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Ventricular Premature Contraction - VPC

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  • RenaRF
    Hey everyone. So Rufus had a recheck EKG today. The arrhythmia is still present (obviously). My vet said that this it s a ventricular arrhythmia, which i am
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 12, 2013
      Hey everyone. So Rufus had a recheck EKG today. The arrhythmia is still present (obviously). My vet said that this it's a ventricular arrhythmia, which i am led to believe is pretty rare. She was going to send the results to the cardiologist and discuss if medications are potentially helpful.

      He does NOT currently have HCM - his ECM showed that IF he is developing it, he doesn't have it yet. I've done a bit of research on the web, and I'm curious about the drug procainamide. Has anyone used this?

      Rufus is negative for heart worm, thyroid issues, and previous heart damage. He is NOT tachycardic. It's just that extra beat.

      I'm way freaked out, frankly. This type of arrhythmia IS associated with sudden death, so I want to be proactive.

      Rena
    • Elfinmyst
      Hi Rena That s what my Maisie was diagnosed with a few weeks ago, along with the HCM. She is going in for a 24 hour ECG on January 1st to see if they can find
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 12, 2013
        Hi Rena

        That's what my Maisie was diagnosed with a few weeks ago, along with the HCM. She is going in for a 24 hour ECG on January 1st to see if they can find more information. But like you, they said it can have a number of reasons, one being damage to the heart muscle. I`ll share any information I get too but for now Maisis is on 5mg atenolol twice a day.

        Lyn:)


      • RenaRF
        Lyn, Thanks so much. :) I was starting to think my messages weren t getting through to the list - haha. So Rufus doesn t have HCM *yet*, so I think the
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 12, 2013
          Lyn,

          Thanks so much.  :)  I was starting to think my messages weren't getting through to the list - haha.

          So Rufus doesn't have HCM *yet*, so I think the cardiologist wants to be careful going with a true beta blocker until and unless it's necessary from an HCM perspective.  The medication I found - procainamide - seems to ONLY deal with arrhythmias without addressing HCM.  Atenolol really addresses both, so it seems like a good choice for Maisie.

          I've found a veterinary research paper on feline heart issues that I'm going to read tonight to see if I can find any additional information as well.  My regular vet is going to talk to the cardiology department that I will use, but if I don't hear, I'll be calling myself!

          Rena

          On Dec 12, 2013, at 7:58 PM, Elfinmyst <elfinmyst@...> wrote:

           

          Hi Rena


          That's what my Maisie was diagnosed with a few weeks ago, along with the HCM. She is going in for a 24 hour ECG on January 1st to see if they can find more information. But like you, they said it can have a number of reasons, one being damage to the heart muscle. I`ll share any information I get too but for now Maisis is on 5mg atenolol twice a day.

          Lyn:)




        • hemizonia
          Hello Rena- It would be good to get a cardiologist input for Rufus. Atenolol or some other med might be in order. Humans throw a PVC every now and then.
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 13, 2013
            Hello Rena-
             
            It would be good to get a cardiologist input for Rufus.  Atenolol or some other med might be in order.
             
            Humans throw a PVC every now and then.  Curiously, it happens more in young people than in older people (absent a pre-existing heart condition). 
             
            The heart rate is controlled by the SA node (sino-atrial) that is located in the right atrium.  It is the heart's pacemaker pretty much because it will generate an electrical impulse faster than other potential electrical cells (foci).  Sometimes though, one of these other foci originating in the ventricles will burp out an electrical pulse, and cause ventricular contraction (without a corresponding atrial contraction).  It's premature because it beats out the next SA node impulse.
             
            The potential danger with PVC's relates to where that "burp" happens in relation to the electrical activity of the heart.  I'm sure you're familiar with the EKG pattern of a small "bump" then the spike up, down and back to baseline then with another small "bump".  (this is actually the pattern seen looking at the heart's electrical activity from only one view .... on a 12-lead EKG, you'll get a different angle view of the electrical activity, so the pattern will change).  The small "bump" you see at the beginning is the P wave, and is atrial in origin.  The following big spikes are the QRS complex, and shows electrical activity in the ventricles (contraction).  The tiny bump that follows that is the T wave and shows electrical repolarization of the ventricles, where the muscle shifts into readiness for the next electrical stimulus.  If a ventricular foci fires off an electrical pulse during the T wave phase, then the heart will go into ventricular fibrillation, and unless immediate intervention is taken, death ensues.  If a ventricular foci fires off any time other than during the T wave, you just get a PVC and go about your business as if nothing had happened.  A lot depends upon the frequency of these PVCs.  The more often they happen, the greater the possibility that one will happen during the T wave.
             
            Certain cardiac meds will decrease the irritability of the heart, and will tend to lessen the chance of an ectopic ventricular foci discharging.
             
            I don't know if this helps at all. 
             
            mary & Leo
             
             
          • RenaRF
            It helps A LOT. Thanks so much. Rufus has a cardiologist at CVCA. The regular vet did the EKG but sent it to the cardiologist. The cardiologist said that she
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 13, 2013
              It helps A LOT. Thanks so much.

              Rufus has a cardiologist at CVCA.  The regular vet did the EKG but sent it to the cardiologist.  The cardiologist said that she believed his VCB wasn't particularly frequent or severe, and didn't recommend medication at this time.

              My vet, however, works with a different CVCA cardiologist, and I think I'm going to ask her to send it over to him and set up an appointment without Rufus where I can ask those kinds of questions.

              Thanks again.

              Rena

              On Dec 13, 2013, at 6:06 AM, Goldenhlls@... wrote:

              Hello Rena-
               
              It would be good to get a cardiologist input for Rufus.  Atenolol or some other med might be in order.
               
              Humans throw a PVC every now and then.  Curiously, it happens more in young people than in older people (absent a pre-existing heart condition). 
               
              The heart rate is controlled by the SA node (sino-atrial) that is located in the right atrium.  It is the heart's pacemaker pretty much because it will generate an electrical impulse faster than other potential electrical cells (foci).  Sometimes though, one of these other foci originating in the ventricles will burp out an electrical pulse, and cause ventricular contraction (without a corresponding atrial contraction).  It's premature because it beats out the next SA node impulse.
               
              The potential danger with PVC's relates to where that "burp" happens in relation to the electrical activity of the heart.  I'm sure you're familiar with the EKG pattern of a small "bump" then the spike up, down and back to baseline then with another small "bump".  (this is actually the pattern seen looking at the heart's electrical activity from only one view .... on a 12-lead EKG, you'll get a different angle view of the electrical activity, so the pattern will change).  The small "bump" you see at the beginning is the P wave, and is atrial in origin.  The following big spikes are the QRS complex, and shows electrical activity in the ventricles (contraction).  The tiny bump that follows that is the T wave and shows electrical repolarization of the ventricles, where the muscle shifts into readiness for the next electrical stimulus.  If a ventricular foci fires off an electrical pulse during the T wave phase, then the heart will go into ventricular fibrillation, and unless immediate intervention is taken, death ensues.  If a ventricular foci fires off any time other than during the T wave, you just get a PVC and go about your business as if nothing had happened.  A lot depends upon the frequency of these PVCs.  The more often they happen, the greater the possibility that one will happen during the T wave.
               
              Certain cardiac meds will decrease the irritability of the heart, and will tend to lessen the chance of an ectopic ventricular foci discharging.
               
              I don't know if this helps at all. 
               
              mary & Leo
               
               

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