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Question about breathing rates

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  • bspringsted425
    Hi everyone. I m really sorry if this is a stupid question, but I m stressing out about this and figured that this was the best place to ask. I know that when
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 4, 2013
      Hi everyone.

      I'm really sorry if this is a stupid question, but I'm stressing out about this and figured that this was the best place to ask.

      I know that when I check Wendy's breathing rate, I need to do it when she's resting/sleeping. Right now, she's at 24, which I know is good. (My vet actually said below 35 was good for her). But earlier today, she was sitting on my lap purring, and her breathing was horrible. She was breathing heavily and taking frequent breaths (though I didn't count them because she kept re-arranging herself or her purring increased or decreased so it was hard to get a good count). As soon as she jumped off my lap and fell asleep on the floor her rate went to 24. I did count to figure that out, but the difference was very visible just by looking at her.

      So I feel like the answer is obvious, but I wanted to make sure. Is it normal for her breathing rate to drastically increase when she's purring? I've been looking at my other cats all afternoon trying to compare them because I realized that I have never really paid attention to the way they breathe when they purr vs when they're asleep.

      As I said, I know that I'm supposed to check it when she's resting or sleeping, but at the same time, I want to make sure that her breathing at other times is also normal. Does that make sense? I feel like I'm not quite articulating what I'm trying to say. Basically, if anyone can tell me if I need to worry about heaving and fast breathing while she's purring, I'd really appreciate it!

      Brooke
    • Laurie Stead
      Hi Brooke - You re doing it perfectly while she is at rest.  24 is great!.  Yes when she is awake even something as slight as sniffing the air the
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 4, 2013
        Hi Brooke -

        You're doing it perfectly while she is at rest.  24 is great!.  Yes when she is awake even something as slight as sniffing the air the respiration increases so as she is loving on you purring away it will seem high for sure.  Its stressful adjusting to everything and you will find yourself checking her rate all the time. But in time you will realize oh wow I didn't check her rate yet today.  That is you easing into it and you almost from eye can then tell when there is trouble because you have studied it so hard.  

        So don't make yourself crazy trying to count breaths while she is awake and purring.  Wait until she is truly resting.  Another alarm indication is if she is in a "meatloaf" position where she is not comfy looking.  If she is lying on her side and/or curled up chances are good she feels well.

        I'm glad Wendy is doing well and never be sorry for support needed.  We have all been there and we all live on that heart disease roller coaster. 

        Laurie and Boo


        From: bspringsted425 <bspringsted425@...>
        To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2013 7:41 PM
        Subject: [FH] Question about breathing rates

         
        Hi everyone.

        I'm really sorry if this is a stupid question, but I'm stressing out about this and figured that this was the best place to ask.

        I know that when I check Wendy's breathing rate, I need to do it when she's resting/sleeping. Right now, she's at 24, which I know is good. (My vet actually said below 35 was good for her). But earlier today, she was sitting on my lap purring, and her breathing was horrible. She was breathing heavily and taking frequent breaths (though I didn't count them because she kept re-arranging herself or her purring increased or decreased so it was hard to get a good count). As soon as she jumped off my lap and fell asleep on the floor her rate went to 24. I did count to figure that out, but the difference was very visible just by looking at her.

        So I feel like the answer is obvious, but I wanted to make sure. Is it normal for her breathing rate to drastically increase when she's purring? I've been looking at my other cats all afternoon trying to compare them because I realized that I have never really paid attention to the way they breathe when they purr vs when they're asleep.

        As I said, I know that I'm supposed to check it when she's resting or sleeping, but at the same time, I want to make sure that her breathing at other times is also normal. Does that make sense? I feel like I'm not quite articulating what I'm trying to say. Basically, if anyone can tell me if I need to worry about heaving and fast breathing while she's purring, I'd really appreciate it!

        Brooke



      • Judi Levens
        Hi Brooke; hopefully someone else will answer with definite answers for your questions. What I know is that we take the bpm when resting because it s easier
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 4, 2013
          Hi Brooke;  hopefully someone else will answer with definite answers for your questions.  What I know is that we take the bpm when resting because it's easier to monitor.  I believe that there is some reason for concern at the behavior you saw today, but I'm not a vet.  If the rate is over 40 I believe it's serious and if she was having trouble breathing she may be getting some fluid build up.  Having said that a resting 24 is very good and says maybe not.  Listen to what everyone else says, but you may want to have her checked again...maybe xray'd to see if there is fluid.  I'm assuming she's had an echo and seen a cardiologist?
          Not very helpful I know, but just wanted to offer whatever I can...good luck...Judi and Angel Max






          To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          From: bspringsted425@...
          Date: Wed, 4 Sep 2013 23:41:58 +0000
          Subject: [FH] Question about breathing rates

           
          Hi everyone.

          I'm really sorry if this is a stupid question, but I'm stressing out about this and figured that this was the best place to ask.

          I know that when I check Wendy's breathing rate, I need to do it when she's resting/sleeping. Right now, she's at 24, which I know is good. (My vet actually said below 35 was good for her). But earlier today, she was sitting on my lap purring, and her breathing was horrible. She was breathing heavily and taking frequent breaths (though I didn't count them because she kept re-arranging herself or her purring increased or decreased so it was hard to get a good count). As soon as she jumped off my lap and fell asleep on the floor her rate went to 24. I did count to figure that out, but the difference was very visible just by looking at her.

          So I feel like the answer is obvious, but I wanted to make sure. Is it normal for her breathing rate to drastically increase when she's purring? I've been looking at my other cats all afternoon trying to compare them because I realized that I have never really paid attention to the way they breathe when they purr vs when they're asleep.

          As I said, I know that I'm supposed to check it when she's resting or sleeping, but at the same time, I want to make sure that her breathing at other times is also normal. Does that make sense? I feel like I'm not quite articulating what I'm trying to say. Basically, if anyone can tell me if I need to worry about heaving and fast breathing while she's purring, I'd really appreciate it!

          Brooke


        • elfinmyst
          Hi Brooke Yes, purring will increase the rate, any activity will. If she is 24 at rest, that s great news for her:) Lyn _www.myfurkids.co.uk_
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 5, 2013
            Hi Brooke
             
            Yes, purring will increase the rate, any activity will. If she is 24 at rest, that's great news for her:)
             
            Lyn
             
          • Jordan
            Hi Brooke, Breathing rates (RRR) vary from kitty to kitty. I think the important thing is to determine a baseline for your kitty. Then if you see
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 6, 2013
              Hi Brooke,
               
              Breathing rates (RRR) vary from kitty to kitty.   I think the important thing is to determine a baseline for your kitty.       Then if you see significant changes, it will tip you off to a potential problem.   
               
              My Sheba's  standard rate has been around 30 from her first diagnosis.     Each time I count her breaths that is always the number I come up with (tho her cardiologist number is always lower).  The important thing is I know that if this number changes, it could suggest a problem.    I also watch for changes in her breathing (double breaths).   Her cardiologist said that her number would jump to 40 or 50 if she was in congestive heart failure (CHF).
               
              Once you get familiar with the RRR for your kitty, I think it will be much easier to detect a problem.
               
              Good luck
              Jordan and Sheba
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