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Echo results for Novaya - "subclinical" changes?

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  • qtip61
    My 4-yr old purebred Russian Blue female Novaya was recently diagnosed with a grade 1-2 new heart murmur.  Based on that finding, my vet recommended an
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2013
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      My 4-yr old purebred Russian Blue female Novaya was recently diagnosed with a grade 1-2 new heart murmur.  Based on that finding, my vet recommended an echocardiogram.  Having had a cat with a grade 2-3 murmur that never indicated heart disease, and in Aug 2010 losing Java at 2 yrs 4 mos to HCM, after dx only 6 wks earlier...I'm familiar with this drill.  Vet said "good news" - in that no enlargement of heart chambers.   However.... Here is the dx & comments, per cardiologist who took the echo: "mild diffuse thickening of the aortic valve leaflets without reduced excursion" "aortic valve disease - mild aortic regurgitation - changes mild and subclinical - R/O congenital vs acquired" "mild papillary muscle hypertrophy and E-A reversal are suggestive of mild/early HCM" "aortic valve changes appear to be acquired but this would be atypical in such a young cat" "trace to mild mitral regurgitation present" I'm not worried about the mitral valve regurgitation, because I had a grade 1 murmur myself, due to that condition,  had no activity restrictions - and 3 yrs of distance running seems to have eliminated the murmur. Recheck Novaya in 6 mos.  Meanwhile, I'm trying to get this little gal to take some CoQ10 (50mg) with her wet food and she detects it and often refuses.  She will take powders - hawthorne or taurine.   I hate the thought of having yet another cat with HCM.  She is against typical profile: female, purebred of a breed not having HCM history. I am not sure how the vet concluded "good news" -  that would have been no changes indicative of HCM.  I've had 2 asthmatic cats, one cat that had rectal cancer, and by far, HCM is the nastiest, least predictable of diseases.  Anybody out there have any ideas on the dx & comments?  And any ideas on how I can make some improvements, perhaps, while the situation is still "subclinical"?  I know from my own situation that in some circumstances, valves can be strengthened and restored to normal function. Chris San Jose, Ca
    • elfinmyst
      Hi The regurgitation is common in pedigree cats. Quite a few of mine have it and it doesn t affect their quality of life and the cardiologist said it wouldn t
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 2, 2013
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        Hi

        The regurgitation is common in pedigree cats. Quite a few of mine have it
        and it doesn't affect their quality of life and the cardiologist said it
        wouldn't progress. BUT you're cat has signs of mild HCM too. The next echo
        will be very helpful and show if it is progressing but in the meantime you
        need to get a resting breathing rate. Wait until she is asleep and count per
        10 seconds and multiply at 6. Note how she breathes and what the rate is.
        Then you will notice any changes quickly if she starts developing more heart
        disease and can contact the vet. Anything over 30 is vet time alarm and
        over 40 tends to be emergency.

        Also ask the cardiologist is there a risk of clots too.

        Lyn

        _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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