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Re: [FH] cor pulmonale (heart failure) - any natural treatments?

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  • Laurie Stead
    Steroids are very dangerous for cats with heart conditions.  Was asthma confirmed with the x-ray?  I ask because my kitty was also treated for asthma and
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 29, 2013
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      Steroids are very dangerous for cats with heart conditions.  Was asthma confirmed with the x-ray?  I ask because my kitty was also treated for asthma and when her symptoms worsened (from the steroid) it was determined she never had asthma.  Asthma and heart failure symptoms are similar.  The best course of action would be an ultrasound so you know exactly what is going on with the heart and the appropriate meds can be prescribed.  A cardiologist is necessary at this stage.  Is this who you refer to as "expert" or was that your regular vet?

      No one can give you a time table - every kitty is different - my Boo was given "months at best"... well in Oct it will be 2yrs!  So my advice would be an ultrasound with a cardiologist, and getting kitty on the right heart meds as soon as possible to give him the best chance.

      Laurie and Boo




      ________________________________
      From: Jason Horsley <homoplasmate@...>
      To: "feline-heart@yahoogroups.com" <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2013 12:19 AM
      Subject: [FH] cor pulmonale (heart failure) - any natural treatments?



       
      Hi
       
      My cat is about 8 years old and in most ways healthy and fit (tho he lost a leg a few years ago).
       
      However, he has been asthmatic for a while now, treatment wasn’t solving it and an X-ray showed that he has cor pulmonale. It’s incurable condition, acc. to conventional medication anyway, and now  the ‘experts’ have given him 3-6 months to live.
       
      He is being treated with an asthma inhaler, prednisolone sodium phosphate (a cortisteroid) also for the asthma, furosemide (a diuretic) for liquid build-up, and baby aspirin (as blood thinner?).
       
      Since conventional medicine isn't offering any real solution, and since its approach is 100% mechanistic (non-holistic) we are also giving him hawthorne for his heart and plan to look into other alternate treatments.
       
      I wanted to see if anyone else has had similar experience with their pet suffering from this condition, and has any advice, or at least war stories, to share?
       
      thanks,
      Jasun

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jordan
      Jason, I would have to concur with both Lyn and Laurie on this one. My Sheba has feline asthma and unclassified cardiomyopathy. Both condition were diagnosed
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 29, 2013
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        Jason,

        I would have to concur with both Lyn and Laurie on this one. My Sheba has feline asthma and unclassified cardiomyopathy.
        Both condition were diagnosed by a cardiologist. Her asthma was confirmed by her chest Xray.

        Due to her heart condition, she was immediately switched to INHALED steriods, and her asthma is well-controlled. She rarely, if ever, has asthma attacks anymore. She is on Flovent for maintenace, and albuterol as a rescue inhaler, though we rarely need that. And Laurie is correct, the symptoms of an asthma attack and a heart episode are very similar.

        Therefore, my instructions from her cardiologist is if she is having an acute episode, give her one puff of the albuterol and see is she responds. If she does not one more puff, and it the attack does not cease, she goes directly to the ER. When she is in the midst of an asthma attack, I cannot even get the AeroKat inhaler to her face cause she is panicked. So I just actuate one puff perpendicular to her face, and that usually stops it immediately.

        If it doesn't though, we are in the car and off to the ER. That is are emergency plan, and everyone in the household knows it. And knows where the ER is located. We also keep the anesthesia protocol from the cardiologist nearby in the event of an emergency surgery, which we also have had to deal with.

        All her medical records indicate . . . ALLERGIC REACTION TO NSAIDS, NO DEPRO MEDROL INJECTIONS (long acting) AND NO USE OF ORAL STERIODS except in emergency situations and they must be short acting.

        Such is life at our house. But my sweet baby girl is worth it.

        Love and kitty kisses,
        Jordan and Sheba


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • homoplasmate
        thanks to everyone for posting. Garbanzo hasn't had blood pressure checked or seen a cardiologist (long trip without a vehicle, and around $700, so a big
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 29, 2013
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          thanks to everyone for posting. Garbanzo hasn't had blood pressure checked or seen a cardiologist (long trip without a vehicle, and around $700, so a big step to take); the 'expert" is his local vet yes; he has an inhaler too but supposed to be restricted to 2 daily doses which isn't much as he coughs/wheezes maybe three times that much. I have been given some additional alternate medicines, inc. aloe vera ( inner leaf capsule),  Mangosteen/Noni/Pomegrante pills for heart,  ginkgo biloba capsule for increased circulation,  Dandelion leaf to release water from the cats system, or yarrow...   lots to look into! --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, <thegapgal@...> wrote: Jason,

          I would have to concur with both Lyn and Laurie on this one. My Sheba has feline asthma and unclassified cardiomyopathy.
          Both condition were diagnosed by a cardiologist. Her asthma was confirmed by her chest Xray.

          Due to her heart condition, she was immediately switched to INHALED steriods, and her asthma is well-controlled. She rarely, if ever, has asthma attacks anymore. She is on Flovent for maintenace, and albuterol as a rescue inhaler, though we rarely need that. And Laurie is correct, the symptoms of an asthma attack and a heart episode are very similar.

          Therefore, my instructions from her cardiologist is if she is having an acute episode, give her one puff of the albuterol and see is she responds. If she does not one more puff, and it the attack does not cease, she goes directly to the ER. When she is in the midst of an asthma attack, I cannot even get the AeroKat inhaler to her face cause she is panicked. So I just actuate one puff perpendicular to her face, and that usually stops it immediately.

          If it doesn't though, we are in the car and off to the ER. That is are emergency plan, and everyone in the household knows it. And knows where the ER is located. We also keep the anesthesia protocol from the cardiologist nearby in the event of an emergency surgery, which we also have had to deal with.

          All her medical records indicate . . . ALLERGIC REACTION TO NSAIDS, NO DEPRO MEDROL INJECTIONS (long acting) AND NO USE OF ORAL STERIODS except in emergency situations and they must be short acting.

          Such is life at our house. But my sweet baby girl is worth it.

          Love and kitty kisses,
          Jordan and Sheba


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • homoplasmate
          Having spoken to the vet she says the steroids are keeping him alive but that a steroid inhaler will work, only that there can be a risk of mouth infections
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 29, 2013
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            Having spoken to the vet she says the steroids are keeping him alive but that a steroid inhaler will work, only that there can be a risk of mouth infections .... the main problem that I could grasp is that his lungs react to something in the air which causes his heart to overwork and send out extra white blood cells and this causes the expansion of the heart, which is now pressing on his lungs from the right side since the heart can't be reduced in size or the scar tissues on lungs healed, the main thing is to keep his blood pressure down increasing the strength of the heart is not recommended, she says --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, <homoplasmate@...> wrote: thanks to everyone for posting. Garbanzo hasn't had blood pressure checked or seen a cardiologist (long trip without a vehicle, and around $700, so a big step to take); the 'expert" is his local vet yes; he has an inhaler too but supposed to be restricted to 2 daily doses which isn't much as he coughs/wheezes maybe three times that much. I have been given some additional alternate medicines, inc. aloe vera ( inner leaf capsule),  Mangosteen/Noni/Pomegrante pills for heart,  ginkgo biloba capsule for increased circulation,  Dandelion leaf to release water from the cats system, or yarrow...   lots to look into! --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com , <thegapgal@...> wrote: Jason,

            I would have to concur with both Lyn and Laurie on this one. My Sheba has feline asthma and unclassified cardiomyopathy.
            Both condition were diagnosed by a cardiologist. Her asthma was confirmed by her chest Xray.

            Due to her heart condition, she was immediately switched to INHALED steriods, and her asthma is well-controlled. She rarely, if ever, has asthma attacks anymore. She is on Flovent for maintenace, and albuterol as a rescue inhaler, though we rarely need that. And Laurie is correct, the symptoms of an asthma attack and a heart episode are very similar.

            Therefore, my instructions from her cardiologist is if she is having an acute episode, give her one puff of the albuterol and see is she responds. If she does not one more puff, and it the attack does not cease, she goes directly to the ER. When she is in the midst of an asthma attack, I cannot even get the AeroKat inhaler to her face cause she is panicked. So I just actuate one puff perpendicular to her face, and that usually stops it immediately.

            If it doesn't though, we are in the car and off to the ER. That is are emergency plan, and everyone in the household knows it. And knows where the ER is located. We also keep the anesthesia protocol from the cardiologist nearby in the event of an emergency surgery, which we also have had to deal with.

            All her medical records indicate . . . ALLERGIC REACTION TO NSAIDS, NO DEPRO MEDROL INJECTIONS (long acting) AND NO USE OF ORAL STERIODS except in emergency situations and they must be short acting.

            Such is life at our house. But my sweet baby girl is worth it.

            Love and kitty kisses,
            Jordan and Sheba


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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