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Re: [FH] Omega-3 Supplement Question

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  • Leigh Arrathoon
    Yes! YES! Give it to her! I use Natrol s Omega-3 (1000mg) - not fish oil, but flaxseed oil. It s wonderful for a heart kitty. I also give mine vitamin E
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 27 10:46 AM
      Yes! YES! Give it to her! I use Natrol's Omega-3 (1000mg) - not fish oil,
      but flaxseed oil. It's wonderful for a heart kitty. I also give mine
      vitamin E (d'alpha tocopherols - 50 IU), CoQ10 with mitochondrial support
      (100 milligrams), and Super Stress B (100 mg). All of these things are good
      for cats with heart problems. The only downside to Omega-3 is that, if your
      cat is small, it may make the coat too oily. You'll have to experiment, but
      it's wonderful for the heart!
      Leigh


      On Tue, Aug 27, 2013 at 12:29 PM, Laurie Stead <kittykatwhiskas@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Hi -
      >
      > Just a quick question since Boo's amazing cardiologist left the practice
      > and they have not replaced her :(
      >
      > I just starting giving an Omega-3 supplement to my non-heart kitty for his
      > excessive itchy skin. Just saw my little heart kitty Boo eating away at
      > his dish. I think she must like the fish oil. It contains 250mg Omega-3
      > fatty acids of which 125mg is EPA and 85mg DHA.
      >
      > Is this safe for Boo to eat? She is taking lasix, benazepril, plavix and
      > vetmedin.
      >
      > Thank you!
      >
      > Laurie and Boo
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • marianna.mayer
      Hi, Laurie, I would say it s safe, and more than likely even good for your Boo as well as your other kitty. I give my animals, dogs include, Wild Salmon Oil
      Message 2 of 17 , Aug 27 5:17 PM
        Hi, Laurie,
        I would say it's safe, and more than likely even good for your Boo as well as your other kitty. I give my animals, dogs include, Wild Salmon Oil daily with their food.

        Marianna


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Laurie Stead <kittykatwhiskas@...>
        To: Feline Heart Group <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tue, Aug 27, 2013 12:30 pm
        Subject: [FH] Omega-3 Supplement Question






        Hi -

        Just a quick question since Boo's amazing cardiologist left the practice and they have not replaced her :(

        I just starting giving an Omega-3 supplement to my non-heart kitty for his excessive itchy skin. Just saw my little heart kitty Boo eating away at his dish. I think she must like the fish oil. It contains 250mg Omega-3 fatty acids of which 125mg is EPA and 85mg DHA.

        Is this safe for Boo to eat? She is taking lasix, benazepril, plavix and vetmedin.







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Laurie Stead
        Thank you Marianna.  Mary Sue sent me a link providing great information where I read it s actually good for the heart.  Go figure my allergy kitty s relief
        Message 3 of 17 , Aug 27 5:31 PM
          Thank you Marianna.  Mary Sue sent me a link providing great information where I read it's actually good for the heart.  Go figure my allergy kitty's relief could help my Boo's heart.  Win-win! :)





          ________________________________
          From: "mmayer11@..." <mmayer11@...>
          To: kittykatwhiskas@...; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 8:17 PM
          Subject: Re: [FH] Omega-3 Supplement Question



           

          Hi, Laurie,
          I would say it's safe, and more than likely even good for your Boo as well as your other kitty. I give my animals, dogs include, Wild Salmon Oil daily with their food.

          Marianna

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • r schu
          Laurie, May has been getting 1000mg fish oil a day for almost 4 years, now Carlsons super omega 3 gems, with 600mg omega 3 s (300mg epa, 200mg dha, 100 other
          Message 4 of 17 , Aug 28 1:15 PM
            Laurie,

            May has been getting 1000mg fish oil a day for almost 4 years, now Carlsons super omega 3 gems, with 600mg omega 3's (300mg epa, 200mg dha, 100 other 3's).  So your dose does not sound like too much at all from what I've read.  Thing to make sure is that the oil is of a quality to not have toxins in it.

            This Carlsons says regularly tested using international protocols for purity free of detrimental levels of mercury, cadmium, lead, pcb's and 28 other contaminants.  It still sounds scary, and I've seen some that are 'filtered' purified somehow.  So not sure this is even the safest.

            Too bad about losing your cardiologist.  Can you still consult with her?

            -Lee and May 

            ===========
            Hi -

            Just a quick question since Boo's amazing cardiologist left the practice and they have not replaced her :(

            I just starting giving an Omega-3 supplement to my non-heart kitty for
            his excessive itchy skin.  Just saw my little heart kitty Boo eating
            away at his dish. I think she must like the fish oil.  It contains 250mg
            Omega-3 fatty acids of which 125mg is EPA and 85mg DHA.

            Is this safe for Boo to eat?  She is taking lasix, benazepril, plavix and vetmedin. 

            Thank you!

            Laurie and Boo


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • r schu
            Leigh, I didn t know flax oil was okay for cats.  I m always cautious about any plant matter.  Cats get their plants in the wild after they have been
            Message 5 of 17 , Aug 28 1:22 PM
              Leigh,

              I didn't know flax oil was okay for cats.  I'm always cautious about any plant matter.  Cats get their plants in the wild after they have been dis-armed, so to speak, by the gut bacteria of their prey.  So many plants are not safe for cats in raw form.

              I do know for humans, flax had the precursor to omega 3 (dha, epa,).  Flax has ala, which from what I've read (Joel Fuhrman Dr. on nutrition) some people can convert easier than others to epa/dha.  I'm not sure about cats. 

              The product you use, says it's for cats, so it must be safe.  And it wouldn't have the heavy metals associated with fish.

              - Lee and May
              ================================

              Yes! YES! Give it to her! I use Natrol's Omega-3 (1000mg) - not fish oil,
              but flaxseed oil. It's wonderful for a heart kitty. I also give mine
              vitamin E (d'alpha tocopherols - 50 IU), CoQ10 with mitochondrial support
              (100 milligrams), and Super Stress B (100 mg). All of these things are good
              for cats with heart problems. The only downside to Omega-3 is that, if your
              cat is small, it may make the coat too oily. You'll have to experiment, but
              it's wonderful for the heart!
              Leigh


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • marianna.mayer
              Hmmm...sorry, I beg to differ, and agree with Lee s concerns. All I have read supports the research that flax is *not* good for cats and/or dogs. They cannot
              Message 6 of 17 , Aug 28 3:56 PM
                Hmmm...sorry, I beg to differ, and agree with Lee's concerns. All I have read supports the research that flax is *not* good for cats and/or dogs. They cannot convert it. Better to avoid it, and supplement with a non toxic wild salmon oil.

                Leigh I'd be interested to read the findings that suggest otherwise.
                Thanks.

                Marianna








                Leigh,

                I didn't know flax oil was okay for cats. I'm always cautious about any plant matter. Cats get their plants in the wild after they have been dis-armed, so to speak, by the gut bacteria of their prey. So many plants are not safe for cats in raw form.

                I do know for humans, flax had the precursor to omega 3 (dha, epa,). Flax has ala, which from what I've read (Joel Fuhrman Dr. on nutrition) some people can convert easier than others to epa/dha. I'm not sure about cats.

                The product you use, says it's for cats, so it must be safe. And it wouldn't have the heavy metals associated with fish.

                - Lee and May
                ================================

                Yes! YES! Give it to her! I use Natrol's Omega-3 (1000mg) - not fish oil,
                but flaxseed oil. It's wonderful for a heart kitty. I also give mine
                vitamin E (d'alpha tocopherols - 50 IU), CoQ10 with mitochondrial support
                (100 milligrams), and Super Stress B (100 mg). All of these things are good
                for cats with heart problems. The only downside to Omega-3 is that, if your
                cat is small, it may make the coat too oily. You'll have to experiment, but
                it's wonderful for the heart!
                Leigh

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jim Sinclair
                My vet says cats can t absorb much of anything from flax. The veterinary nutritionist I consulted with recommends this product:
                Message 7 of 17 , Aug 28 3:58 PM
                  My vet says cats can't absorb much of anything from flax.

                  The veterinary nutritionist I consulted with recommends this product:
                  http://www.drfuhrman.com/shop/DHA_EPA.aspx

                  It has DHA from algae, not fish. (The algae is where the fish get it
                  in the first place

                  Jim Sinclair jisincla@...

                  On Aug 28, 2013 4:23 PM, "r schu" <rschu92@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Leigh,
                  >
                  > I didn't know flax oil was okay for cats. I'm always cautious about any plant matter. Cats get their plants in the wild after they have been dis-armed, so to speak, by the gut bacteria of their prey. So many plants are not safe for cats in raw form.
                  >
                  > I do know for humans, flax had the precursor to omega 3 (dha, epa,). Flax has ala, which from what I've read (Joel Fuhrman Dr. on nutrition) some people can convert easier than others to epa/dha. I'm not sure about cats.
                  >
                  > The product you use, says it's for cats, so it must be safe. And it wouldn't have the heavy metals associated with fish.
                  >
                  > - Lee and May
                  > ================================
                  >
                  > Yes! YES! Give it to her! I use Natrol's Omega-3 (1000mg) - not fish oil,
                  > but flaxseed oil. It's wonderful for a heart kitty. I also give mine
                  > vitamin E (d'alpha tocopherols - 50 IU), CoQ10 with mitochondrial support
                  > (100 milligrams), and Super Stress B (100 mg). All of these things are good
                  > for cats with heart problems. The only downside to Omega-3 is that, if your
                  > cat is small, it may make the coat too oily. You'll have to experiment, but
                  > it's wonderful for the heart!
                  > Leigh
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                • Mary Sue Rubin
                  Krill oil or oils from some smaller cold water fish are often mentioned as alternatives to salmon oil. They are lower on the food chain so they don t have the
                  Message 8 of 17 , Aug 28 4:23 PM
                    Krill oil or oils from some smaller cold water fish are often mentioned as
                    alternatives to salmon oil. They are lower on the food chain so they don't
                    have the problem with heavy metals that salmon and larger fish are likely to
                    have.



                    Mary Sue



                    From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com] On
                    Behalf Of mmayer11@...
                    Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 6:57 PM
                    To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [FH] Re: Omega-3 Supplement Question

                    All I have read supports the research that flax is *not* good for cats
                    and/or dogs. They cannot convert it. Better to avoid it, and supplement with
                    a non toxic wild salmon oil.
                    Marianna






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • marianna.mayer
                    FYI...Unfortunately there is no responsible harvesting of krill. The way this sea life is obtained is by trolling the ocean floor, killing and destroying other
                    Message 9 of 17 , Aug 28 6:34 PM
                      FYI...Unfortunately there is no responsible harvesting of krill. The way this sea life is obtained is by trolling the ocean floor, killing and destroying other sea life indiscriminately as these mega companies troll with their huge machinery. Please don't support such practices.

                      Marianna





                      Krill oil or oils from some smaller cold water fish are often mentioned as alternatives to salmon oil. They are lower on the food chain so they don’t have the problem with heavy metals that salmon and larger fish are likely to have.

                      Mary Sue








                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • elfinmyst
                      Hi There is an alternative, the biomanufactered Omega 3 EPA and DHA. Its made in huge bio tanks with bacteria or algae and vegetarians use it instead of fish
                      Message 10 of 17 , Aug 29 6:14 AM
                        Hi

                        There is an alternative, the biomanufactered Omega 3 EPA and DHA. Its made
                        in huge bio tanks with bacteria or algae and vegetarians use it instead of
                        fish oil in the UK. But those are human supplements in capsules, for my
                        cats I would still use salmon oil.

                        Lyn

                        _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • r schu
                        To correct myself here:  plants are dis-armed so to speak, not by gut bacteria, but rather by the liver of the animal who ate them.  I m no expert, but am
                        Message 11 of 17 , Aug 30 12:11 PM
                          To correct myself here:  plants are 'dis-armed' so to speak, not by gut bacteria, but rather by the liver of the animal who ate them.  I'm no expert, but am always cautious with plants and cats, and make sure things are safe.  So for the omega 3 from algae that the fish eat.  Chances are it's absolutely fine for cats, but there could be a liver enzyme in the fish that somehow change the chemistry to make them different. 

                          Humans eat flax which has ala, and our bodies, some better than others, convert the ala to dha and eph, which are the usable omega 3's everyone talks about.  That is the only example I can think of right now, as I'm no expert on nutrition or plant chemicals!  And neither is May.

                          I've read that essential oils are bad for cats, but many many people give them to their casts with no ill effect, so different schools of thought and different experiences.

                          -Lee and May

                          ============

                          Leigh,

                          I didn't know flax oil was okay for cats.  I'm always cautious about any
                          plant matter.  Cats get their plants in the wild after they have been
                          dis-armed, so to speak, by the gut bacteria of their prey.  So many
                          plants are not safe for cats in raw form.

                          ...Lee


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • r schu
                          If I knew that the algae omega 3 s was for sure safe for cats, I d switch immediately.  But I m not sure it s going to be anytime soon that studies are done
                          Message 12 of 17 , Aug 30 12:21 PM
                            If I knew that the algae omega 3's was for sure safe for cats, I'd switch immediately.  But I'm not sure it's going to be anytime soon that studies are done to prove it.  That being said, at least one list member I've written with is using it for cats with no ill effects, and that might be conclusive enough. 

                            I take the algal omega 3 for myself, choosing not to consume an animal product (fish oil).

                            -Lee
                            ============
                            Hi

                            There is an alternative, the biomanufactered Omega 3 EPA and DHA. Its made
                            in huge bio tanks with bacteria or algae and vegetarians use it instead of
                            fish oil in the UK. But those are human supplements in capsules, for my
                            cats I would still use salmon oil.

                            Lyn


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • ERIC LEE
                            Hello, Look at the contents for Cardiostrength. You can find it online. A board certified vet said it was ok to give it to my cat. I like this  becasue I am
                            Message 13 of 17 , Aug 30 12:51 PM
                              Hello,

                              Look at the contents for Cardiostrength. You can find it online. A board certified vet said it was ok to give it to my cat. I like this  becasue I am concerned about giving too much. I did buy a bottle of fish oil made for cats from my vet that tells you how much to give on the label but once I found the Cardiostrength, I just give that.

                              Facts:
                              Active Ingredients Per Capsule:
                              L-Carnitine HCl                                       250 mg
                              L-Taurine                                             250 mg
                              N,N-Dimethylglycine HCl                                50 mg
                              d-alpha Tocopheryl Succinate (Vitamin E)               30 IU
                              Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) Powder Blend               25 mg
                              Coenzyme Q10                                           20 mg
                              Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA) Powder Blend                10 mg
                              Folic Acid                                            0.9 mg
                              Magnesium (as Magnesium Citrate/Malate)               0.5 mg
                              Potassium (as Potassium Citrate/Malate)               0.1 mg
                              Selenium (as Sodium Selenite)                       0.007 mg

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • elfinmyst
                              Hi I loved cardiostrength, but they stopped selling it in the UK due to lack of people buying it. It s too expensive to import, but it worked well for my cats.
                              Message 14 of 17 , Aug 30 12:56 PM
                                Hi

                                I loved cardiostrength, but they stopped selling it in the UK due to lack
                                of people buying it. It's too expensive to import, but it worked well for my
                                cats. But whoa, they're big capsules:)

                                Lyn

                                _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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