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Re: New to group could use some guidance.

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  • elfinmyst
    Hi JR A grade 3 murmur is nearly always something wrong with the heart. The only way to tell is an ultrasound which is the gold standard test. Don t go for any
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 21, 2013
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      Hi JR

      A grade 3 murmur is nearly always something wrong with the heart. The only
      way to tell is an ultrasound which is the gold standard test. Don't go for
      any blood tests or xrays, the ultrasound is the way to go. I`m not sure of
      the costs in the US though, if you tell us where you are , someone may know
      the cheapest scan.

      Lyn

      _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • elfinmyst
      ((This reply was for whole group:)) Hi Lyn. Thank you for writing and for suggesting the echo only. We are in the San Francisco Bay area now; spent most of our
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 21, 2013
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        ((This reply was for whole group:))


        Hi Lyn.
        Thank you for writing and for suggesting the echo only.
        We are in the San Francisco Bay area now; spent most of our lives in NY.
        Actually did a lot of work in UK (Beconsfield) and London.

        There are two specialty groups one of which has a cardiologist at their
        location about 1/2 hour away (barring traffic) several days per week. I have
        a call into my GP vet but I suspect there is little she can do other than
        possibly help with a safe sedative...the kitty panted so hard and was so
        frantic in the car I thought she'd give herself a heart attack even before I
        found out it is a she and that she has a heart condition.

        This little tuxedo is adorable and friendly and wants to cuddle, so
        someone took the time to humanize her and neuter before she found us. We suspect
        that once the heart condition was ID'd they let her go stray. She has been
        eating at our feeding station and we didn't realize until this past week
        that she is friendly. Now she's here all night and tried to stay this
        morning. Not feasible given the black male we took in that suffered extreme
        vestibular and horner's syndrome's from ruptured ear canal is very territorial;
        at 15 lbs he'll decimate her.

        As usual, it's a stress mess to figure out but we always do somehow. With
        a heart condition no one is likely to adopt her if we don't find a way to
        fix or control her circumstances. People don't want the trouble or
        costs....it's hard enough getting a cat even at age 1 adopted. People want kittens.

        We are not familiar with any of the meds we've been seeing folks mention
        in their messages.
        Does your forum have reference files I can peruse for more information?
        I didn't see any.

        Thanks again and best regards,
        JR



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • elfinmyst
        Hi JR I sent your last post to the whole group to help you. We have files in the forum, you can search by keyword to get some help. I hope someone else can
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 21, 2013
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          Hi JR

          I sent your last post to the whole group to help you. We have files in the
          forum, you can search by keyword to get some help. I hope someone else can
          explain how to do this, as I can't log on today, just Email.

          It may be possible your male boy will accept such a small kitten, who is
          not a threat to him, especially a girl. Cats dont reach social maturity until
          around 2 (3 for some breeds) but obviously this kitten needs to avoid
          stress. If you do want to bring her in I`d ask the vet for advice on how to do
          it, getting used to smells and slowly.

          I would certainly consider a sedation if she is so bad in the car that she
          can't get to the cardiologist. Ask them to just do the ultrasound if they
          will, that's vital for diagnosis. Medication depends on what is wrong.

          Lyn
          _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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