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Re: Stethoscope?

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  • elfinmyst
    Hi Jim I got the one that was for medical students. They re reasonably priced and choose one with a good feedback:) Lyn _www.myfurkids.co.uk_
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
      Hi Jim

      I got the one that was for medical students. They're reasonably priced and
      choose one with a good feedback:)

      Lyn

      _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • rhywnn gaffney
      I would get one that has a child side and adult side. Dont get the cheep one but look at the ones like a cardiostaf. And i would get a used one to save money.
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
        I would get one that has a child side and adult side. Dont get the cheep
        one but look at the ones like a cardiostaf. And i would get a used one to
        save money.
        Rhywnn
        On Jul 5, 2013 4:24 AM, <elfinmyst@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Hi Jim
        >
        > I got the one that was for medical students. They're reasonably priced and
        > choose one with a good feedback:)
        >
        > Lyn
        >
        > _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sharon
        I m not sure that to a person with no medical training the quality of a Stethoscope is going to make a tremendous amount of difference. It takes training to be
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
          I'm not sure that to a person with no medical training the quality of a
          Stethoscope is going to make a tremendous amount of difference. It takes
          training to be able to hear the different sounds that one would need to
          identify different heart and lung sounds. I have been breeding many years
          and have spent much time watching my vets listen to the heart of both
          kittens and adults. The heart rate is much faster than in humans. I
          consider myself pretty intelligent medically but I would not trust myself
          to diagnose any problem with a stethoscope no matter the quality, it is the
          training of the person listening that makes the difference. If I feel
          there is a problem I am going to my vet for their professional opinion.
          Sharon
          LuvNMuffin RagaMuffins


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jim Sinclair
          ... Those are my thoughts too. As I wrote to someone off-list yesterday, I could buy the world s best stethoscope and be able to hear all sorts of subtle
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
            On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 11:38 AM, Sharon <sharong9@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > I'm not sure that to a person with no medical training the quality of a
            > Stethoscope is going to make a tremendous amount of difference.

            Those are my thoughts too. As I wrote to someone off-list yesterday, I
            could buy the world's best stethoscope and be able to hear all sorts
            of subtle sounds with it, but if I don't understand what I'm hearing,
            it won't do me or my cats any good.

            > It takes
            > training to be able to hear the different sounds that one would need to
            > identify different heart and lung sounds.

            I got my old stethoscope primarily to make it easier to count Clipsy's
            heart rate, not to try to identify or diagnose anything. I remember
            the first time I listened to her heart with it. It was so fast! I felt
            terrible that my poor kitty's heart was racing like that--until I
            listened to a different, healthy cat's heart and found out it was just
            as fast. Yes, their heart rate really is faster than a human's!

            I now have two cats diagnosed with airway disease, one of whom
            (Rhapsody) also has mild heart disease, and I'd really like to be able
            to listen for wheezing or gurgling. Especially as Rhapsody also has
            some neurological dysfunction and often has his mouth hanging open. A
            stethoscope can help me distinguish between an open mouth due to poor
            oral muscle tone vs. an open mouth due to difficulty breathing. Gaping
            open-mouth panting or gasping is obvious without a stethoscope, but
            mouth just somewhat ajar is harder to evaluate.

            Some things my vet can also teach me to identify. That doesn't make me
            qualified to diagnose any problems, but hopefully it helps me make
            better decisions about when it's necessary to give an inhaler puff,
            call the vet, or go to the ER.

            For that I don't need a *great* stethoscope, I just need a "good enough" one.

            Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
          • elfinmyst
            I agree with Jim, Mine was a simple medical student one from Ebay. I use it to check heart rate and to listen to breathing. I think it s more to pick up
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
              I agree with Jim,

              Mine was a simple medical student one from Ebay. I use it to check heart
              rate and to listen to breathing. I think it's more to pick up something new
              and different like a wheeze or crackling in the lungs, but mostly my cats
              have shown increased breathing or change in breathing when they had problems.
              If you have a normal cat and a heart cat, you can more easily pick up lung
              wheezes.

              Lyn

              _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • bingley50
              I agree with you on the necessity of the skill and medical training, but there is an audio book available on Amazon that would be of interest even for
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 6, 2013
                I agree with you on the necessity of the skill and medical training, but there is an audio book available on Amazon that would be of interest even for laypersons. I haven't bought it yet, but it was recommended by a vet to her vet tech class. It's called "Rapid Interpretation of Heart and Lung Sounds: A Guide to Cardiac and Respiratory Auscultation in Dogs and Cats" by Smith, Keene, and Tilley. It is approximately $61.

                http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0721604269/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_5?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

                Heather & Spirit (hcm kitty) in Mass.


                --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Sharon <sharong9@...> wrote:
                >
                > I'm not sure that to a person with no medical training the quality of a
                > Stethoscope is going to make a tremendous amount of difference. It takes
                > training to be able to hear the different sounds that one would need to
                > identify different heart and lung sounds. I have been breeding many years
                > and have spent much time watching my vets listen to the heart of both
                > kittens and adults. The heart rate is much faster than in humans. I
                > consider myself pretty intelligent medically but I would not trust myself
                > to diagnose any problem with a stethoscope no matter the quality, it is the
                > training of the person listening that makes the difference. If I feel
                > there is a problem I am going to my vet for their professional opinion.
                > Sharon
                > LuvNMuffin RagaMuffins
                >
                >
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