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Re: [FH] Re: cyproheptadine

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  • Anyes Moscrip
    ... Here is a referrence to the interaction between Cyproheptadine and calcium channnel blockers. It is from Dr. Plumb s Book of Pills. Our Internal
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 31, 2002
      Susan wrote:

      > --- JettawayFCRs@... wrote:
      > > > He was taking cyproheptadine to stimulate his appetite, but I
      > understand that it can cause a possibly fatal reaction causing the BP to
      > drop too low, so I have been afraid to give it to him...so far, I'm getting
      > him to eat some without it.
      > >
      > > This is interesting. I lost a kitty in Dec. just a couple of days after
      > starting him on cyproheptadine. He went downhill
      > > very fast

      Here is a referrence to the interaction between Cyproheptadine and calcium
      channnel blockers. It is from Dr. Plumb's Book of Pills. Our Internal
      Medicine specialist had seen this interaction several times before in the ER,
      and she was very upset that our heart kitty was given Cypro. Lucie never
      recovered and died 2 weeks later.
      Personally, I would not tempt fate, knowing this.

      "Like other H1 receptor antihistamines, cypro acts by competing with
      histamine for sites on H1 -receptor sites on effector cells. Antihistamines
      do not block histamine release, but can antagonize its effects. Cyrpo also
      possesses potent antiserotonin activity and reportedly has calcium channel
      blocking action as well."

      This has the effect of a drop in blood pressure.

      Anyes and the girls
    • Gillinov
      Many people have mentioned slippery elm bark on this website as an appetite stimulant that is safe for cats with heart issues to take. Since my cat isn t
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 25, 2007
        Many people have mentioned slippery elm bark on this website as an
        appetite stimulant that is safe for cats with heart issues to take.
        Since my cat isn't eating much because zenequin has caused him to feel
        ill I called the vet's office yesterday to see what the vet thought of
        slippery elm bark. A doctor that is brand new to the practice called
        me back today and said I should give my cat two pills of
        cyproheptadine a day. Based on everything that I have read at this
        website, I know that 2 pills will be much too large. However, I am
        also concerned about using cypro because in 2006 people were posting
        about they had heard that animals with heart disease, high blood
        pressure, and an overactive thyroid should not take this medicine.
        Since my cat is on tapazol, norvasc, and enacard, I am wondering if
        people still have concerns about using cypro?
      • savionna@aol.com
        Hi Melissa, ... I can t speak for anyone else...but I mention slippery elm bark as a remedy for nausea, dig. tract irritation, and elimination problems (both
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 25, 2007
          Hi Melissa,

          In a message dated 12/25/07 2:45:46 PM, gillinov@... writes:

          > Many people have mentioned slippery elm bark on this website as an
          > appetite stimulant that is safe for cats with heart issues to take.
          >
          I can't speak for anyone else...but I mention slippery elm bark as a remedy
          for nausea, dig. tract irritation, and elimination problems (both constipation
          and diarrhea). It *may* stimulate appetite to the extent that it relieves
          problems such as nausea etc, which can adversely affect appetite. But slippery elm
          is not an appetite stimulant per se.

          > Since my cat isn't eating much because zenequin has caused him to feel
          > ill I called the vet's office yesterday to see what the vet thought of
          > slippery elm bark. 
          >
          Most conventional veterinarians have no training or experience with
          plant-based remedies.

          > A doctor that is brand new to the practice called
          > me back today and said I should give my cat two pills of
          > cyproheptadine a day.
          >
          Cyproheptadine is a synthetic anti-histamine that has a secondary effect of
          stimulating appetite in cats.

          It is not low risk. From
          http://www.petplace.com/drug-library/cyproheptadine-periactin/page1.aspx : "Cyproheptadine should be used with caution in animals
          with glaucoma, prostate gland enlargement, heart failure or gastrointestinal
          obstructions."

          From http://www.marvistavet.com/html/cyproheptadine.html :

          "Drowsiness is a common side effect. Occasionally a cat will have a what is
          called a “paradoxic” reaction and become excited. As with other
          antihistamines, “anticholinergic effects” occur at higher doses or overdose. These effects
          include: Urine retention, increased pressure in the eye (only of concern in
          patients predisposed to glaucoma), dry mouth, increased heart rate, elevated
          body temperature....Cyproheptadine is best avoided in patients with glaucoma,
          recovering from urinary blockage, and heart failure patients."

          >   Based on everything that I have read at this
          > website, I know that 2 pills will be much too large. 
          >
          Typical dose for cats for appetite stimulation is 1-4 mg 1-2x/day. Each pill
          is 4mg.

          > However, I am
          > also concerned about using cypro because in 2006 people were posting
          > about they had heard that animals with heart disease, high blood
          > pressure, and an overactive thyroid should not take this medicine.
          >
          Yes, see above.

          > Since my cat  is on tapazol, norvasc, and enacard, I am wondering if
          > people still have concerns about using cypro? 
          >
          I (my opinion only) have concerns about using cyproheptadine with any cat.
          Just from an ethical standpoint alone, I think it's problematic to give a drug
          that takes away control over appetite when a cat has "legitimate" reason not to
          eat. I think a safe, sound solution is to reduce or remove the issues that
          are negatively affecting appetite and support the digestive system, while also
          using techniques such as spoon feeding, tasty bribes, and small, frequent meals
          of a bland food that encourage the cat to eat. In your case, you believe that
          an antibx is causing the inappetance. This is not uncommon. So some steps to
          pursue would be to reduce the amt of antibx needed by using other means to
          help manage the infection and soothe the dig. tract with slippery elm bark.

          A low-risk, gentle appetite stimulant is injectable Vit B12, which a vet can
          provide as prefilled syringes. // Rosemary





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        • Erica S.
          Hi, Melissa, I can t answer your question as to how cypro will interact with the other meds your cat is on - but I can tell you that using cypro has helped my
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 26, 2007
            Hi, Melissa,

            I can't answer your question as to how cypro will
            interact with the other meds your cat is on - but I
            can tell you that using cypro has helped my kitty Zora
            to go on eating. She has many reasons to feel
            nauseated and not all of them can be addressed beyond
            what I am already doing -

            Zora is hyperT, CRF, HCM and pancreatitis. The
            tapazole she takes for her hyperT can cause nausea and
            inappetance, but without it her thyroid would be out
            of control. She gets everything she needs for her
            kidney disease (fluids, phos binders, etc) but her
            numbers are high and CRF can cause nausea and
            inappetance. She is on antibiotics for a UTI and they
            too cause the same. When we took her off the
            antibiotics too early because we thought her UTI was
            cured, she had a major kidney crash and we almost lost
            her. She is back on antibiotics.

            My point? It's definitely best to try to figure out
            what underlies the inappetance and address that. But
            you can't always get rid of all of the causes of
            nausea and inappetance. When that is the case,
            sometimes you have to use "artificial means" as long
            as they do no harm. For us, cyproheptadine has been a
            miracle drug. It keeps Zora eating. As I'm sure you
            know, unlike humans, cats can't fast. THey must
            eat.

            We started with a very low dose of cypro, much lower
            than you're cat was prescribed - 1/8 of 4mg tab twice
            a day. After Zora's kidney crash, we increased it to
            1/4 of the tab twice a day. We have been lucky she
            has had no side effects from it. You do need to watch
            for hyperactive reactions and lethargy reactions.
            Zora also takes atenelol for her heart disease and
            there hasn't been an interaction problem with that.

            I do use slippery elm bark, but I use that more for
            digestive issues - diarrhea and constipation.

            Hope this helps.

            Erica
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