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Re: [FH] Relief about oxygen tank

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  • Jim Sinclair
    ... Respectfully, if someone s vet is so lacking in knowledge about feline asthma that they need information from me to help educate the vet, they need to find
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25, 2013
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      On Wed, Apr 24, 2013 at 4:25 PM, <nyppsi@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Jim Sinclair jisincla@... writes: <<.....I am not going to post
      > specifics because if anyone else is going to make an oxygen cage, I want
      > them to
      > get guidance from their own vet about their own cat instead of copying
      > what
      > the vet here recommended
      > for Rhapsody.)>>
      >
      >
      > Jim,
      >
      > I understand your logic, but in some cases, people whose vets are not
      > knowledgeable about asthma (and MANY MANY vets are not) may need something
      > to
      > use as a talking point when they ask their vet for plans for an oxygen
      > cage/tent.

      Respectfully, if someone's vet is so lacking in knowledge about feline
      asthma that they need information from me to help educate the vet,
      they need to find a new vet! What I know about feline asthma could fit
      on a single page. Double-spaced.

      > While their vet's recommendation (assuming that they even give one) may
      > not
      > be exactly the same as the one your vet/tech gave you, having yours to ask
      > their vet/tech about provides a starting point and gives one something to
      > compare theirs to..

      At least maybe it could give them something to visualize and ask their
      vet about. Since a prescription is required to get a home oxygen tank
      in the first place, I certainly *hope* the vet who prescribes the
      oxygen would also provide instructions for how to use it.

      Okay, so what I got is a plastic storage box, with lid, from Kmart. I
      chose a clear one so the cat can see out and I can see in to monitor
      him if we ever need to use it.

      The vet drew markings showing the location to drill a small hole for
      the oxygen tube to go in (and my housemate then cleverly used a little
      faucet nipple and some washers and a nut to make a nozzle with
      airtight seal for the oxygen tube to fit onto), and other locations to
      cut larger holes for ventilating the carbon dioxide the cat would be
      exhaling and for letting room air in, as breathing pure 100% oxygen
      for an extended length of time can cause damage. I also plan to buy a
      small thermometer to put in the box, to make sure he doesn't get
      overheated.

      That's the basic idea: one hole for oxygen from the tank to go in,
      more and larger holes for ventilation, make sure it doesn't get too
      warm inside. Also, the flow rate for giving oxygen in the box is much
      higher than the flow rate for giving it through a mask.

      Anyone wanting to make one for your own cat, ask your own vet (the one
      who prescribes the oxygen) for specifics on a good box size for your
      cat's body size, locations of oxygen intake and ventilation holes,
      number and size of ventilation holes, and flow rate of oxygen. And
      watch the temperature in there, especially if your cat gets
      hypothermic like Rhapsdy so you put in a heating pad. Make sure it
      doesn't heat up too much.

      Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
    • bubbacat12003
      There are also video clips on youtube. I had many that needed nebulization for respiratory issues and I use a standard pet carrier. I cellophane up the front
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 25, 2013
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        There are also video clips on youtube.

        I had many that needed nebulization for respiratory issues and I use a standard pet carrier. I cellophane up the front grill and side vents and poke the hose thru one of the spaces in the front grill. Works great for nebulization and I bet could also be used for oxygen. My kitties are accustomed to the carrier, so were not at all afraid.

        Jo
        __________________







        -----Original Message-----
        From: Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...>
        To: nyppsi <nyppsi@...>
        Cc: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thu, Apr 25, 2013 3:12 pm
        Subject: Re: [FH] Relief about oxygen tank






        On Wed, Apr 24, 2013 at 4:25 PM, <nyppsi@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Jim Sinclair jisincla@... writes: <<.....I am not going to post
        > specifics because if anyone else is going to make an oxygen cage, I want
        > them to
        > get guidance from their own vet about their own cat instead of copying
        > what
        > the vet here recommended
        > for Rhapsody.)>>
        >
        >
        > Jim,
        >
        > I understand your logic, but in some cases, people whose vets are not
        > knowledgeable about asthma (and MANY MANY vets are not) may need something
        > to
        > use as a talking point when they ask their vet for plans for an oxygen
        > cage/tent.

        Respectfully, if someone's vet is so lacking in knowledge about feline
        asthma that they need information from me to help educate the vet,
        they need to find a new vet! What I know about feline asthma could fit
        on a single page. Double-spaced.

        > While their vet's recommendation (assuming that they even give one) may
        > not
        > be exactly the same as the one your vet/tech gave you, having yours to ask
        > their vet/tech about provides a starting point and gives one something to
        > compare theirs to..

        At least maybe it could give them something to visualize and ask their
        vet about. Since a prescription is required to get a home oxygen tank
        in the first place, I certainly *hope* the vet who prescribes the
        oxygen would also provide instructions for how to use it.

        Okay, so what I got is a plastic storage box, with lid, from Kmart. I
        chose a clear one so the cat can see out and I can see in to monitor
        him if we ever need to use it.

        The vet drew markings showing the location to drill a small hole for
        the oxygen tube to go in (and my housemate then cleverly used a little
        faucet nipple and some washers and a nut to make a nozzle with
        airtight seal for the oxygen tube to fit onto), and other locations to
        cut larger holes for ventilating the carbon dioxide the cat would be
        exhaling and for letting room air in, as breathing pure 100% oxygen
        for an extended length of time can cause damage. I also plan to buy a
        small thermometer to put in the box, to make sure he doesn't get
        overheated.

        That's the basic idea: one hole for oxygen from the tank to go in,
        more and larger holes for ventilation, make sure it doesn't get too
        warm inside. Also, the flow rate for giving oxygen in the box is much
        higher than the flow rate for giving it through a mask.

        Anyone wanting to make one for your own cat, ask your own vet (the one
        who prescribes the oxygen) for specifics on a good box size for your
        cat's body size, locations of oxygen intake and ventilation holes,
        number and size of ventilation holes, and flow rate of oxygen. And
        watch the temperature in there, especially if your cat gets
        hypothermic like Rhapsdy so you put in a heating pad. Make sure it
        doesn't heat up too much.

        Jim Sinclair jisincla@...







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