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Relief about oxygen tank

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  • Jim Sinclair
    Whew! Rhapsody made it through the weekend without needing oxygen therapy at all, though I kept a crescent wrench by the tank all weekend just in case. This
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 22, 2013
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      Whew! Rhapsody made it through the weekend without needing oxygen
      therapy at all, though I kept a crescent wrench by the tank all
      weekend just in case. This morning the company where I got the tanks
      returned my phone message, and I am going there to pick up the valve
      attachment.

      Many thanks to everyone who responded with information, advice, and
      video links during the weekend.

      Replying to several specific comments or questions people sent:

      I know how to use the regulator on the oxygen tanks, and have
      instructions from the ER vet about the flow rate setting. The problem
      I had is that the thing that goes onto the valve at the top of the
      tank, to turn the flow on and off, wasn't there. It was my first time
      swapping out an empty tank for a full one, and I knew the regulator
      came off the old one to be used with the new one, but I didn't know
      the lever on top came off too, and I guess the people at the company
      didn't notice it was still on the tank I turned in.

      I got a plastic storage box to use as an oxygen cage. The critical
      care specialist at the ER drew markings on the box to show me where to
      drill holes, and size of holes to drill, for the O2 to go in and for
      CO2 to go out and room air to come in to mix with the tank oxygen. She
      also wrote down different flow rates to use with the box vs. the mask.
      (I am not going to post specifics because if anyone else is going to
      make an oxygen cage, I want them to get guidance from their own vet
      about their own cat instead of copying what the vet here recommended
      for Rhapsody.)

      Rhapsody is not on furosemide because he does not have fluid buildup.
      The cardiologist doesn't think his current symptoms are related to his
      heart at all.

      He may not have asthma either. The vet who saw him last Thursday heard
      no wheezes or crackles in his lungs, and was unable to explain the
      dyspnea and pale gums and ataxia with hypermetric gait. She said the
      only other times she's seen cats looking like he did, the cats had
      chests and lungs filled with fluid. Again, Rhapsody does not have
      that.

      We're waiting for results of a toxoplasma test, and the vet said
      toxoplasma can affect the brain as well as the lungs. I am becoming
      more and more convinced that whatever is going on with Rhapsody is at
      least affecting his brainstem, and the brainstem may even be where the
      primary problem is.

      Rhapsody had a good weekend with excellent appetite and excellent
      morale. He is still somewhat ataxic, but has improved a lot since
      Friday night when he (terrifyingly!) fell down the stairs, tumbling
      floppily and helplessly like a stuffed toy rolling down. Since
      Saturday he's been a bit wobbly in his gait and has been learning to
      make accommodations for his apparent inability to jump as well as he
      used to, but I haven't seen him fall over. He has been cheerful and
      purring a lot. My housemate remarked on Saturday that he seemed to be
      aware and appreciative of not being in pain, not having trouble
      breathing, and grateful for being able to feel better.

      And now I am off to pick up the thing for the O2 tanks, and also
      refill his azithromycin prescription and get Willow some more vitamin
      B12 shots.

      Thanks again for all the advice, support, and prayers!

      Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
    • nyppsi
      Jim Sinclair jisincla@syr.edu writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 24, 2013
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        Jim Sinclair jisincla@... writes: <<.....I am not going to post
        specifics because if anyone else is going to make an oxygen cage, I want them to
        get guidance from their own vet about their own cat instead of copying what
        the vet here recommended
        for Rhapsody.)>>


        Jim,

        I understand your logic, but in some cases, people whose vets are not
        knowledgeable about asthma (and MANY MANY vets are not) may need something to
        use as a talking point when they ask their vet for plans for an oxygen
        cage/tent.

        While their vet's recommendation (assuming that they even give one) may not
        be exactly the same as the one your vet/tech gave you, having yours to ask
        their vet/tech about provides a starting point and gives one something to
        compare theirs to..

        Please post a description of what you got as a recommendation.

        I'm sure it will be appreciated by all.

        Dick


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jim Sinclair
        ... Respectfully, if someone s vet is so lacking in knowledge about feline asthma that they need information from me to help educate the vet, they need to find
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 25, 2013
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          On Wed, Apr 24, 2013 at 4:25 PM, <nyppsi@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Jim Sinclair jisincla@... writes: <<.....I am not going to post
          > specifics because if anyone else is going to make an oxygen cage, I want
          > them to
          > get guidance from their own vet about their own cat instead of copying
          > what
          > the vet here recommended
          > for Rhapsody.)>>
          >
          >
          > Jim,
          >
          > I understand your logic, but in some cases, people whose vets are not
          > knowledgeable about asthma (and MANY MANY vets are not) may need something
          > to
          > use as a talking point when they ask their vet for plans for an oxygen
          > cage/tent.

          Respectfully, if someone's vet is so lacking in knowledge about feline
          asthma that they need information from me to help educate the vet,
          they need to find a new vet! What I know about feline asthma could fit
          on a single page. Double-spaced.

          > While their vet's recommendation (assuming that they even give one) may
          > not
          > be exactly the same as the one your vet/tech gave you, having yours to ask
          > their vet/tech about provides a starting point and gives one something to
          > compare theirs to..

          At least maybe it could give them something to visualize and ask their
          vet about. Since a prescription is required to get a home oxygen tank
          in the first place, I certainly *hope* the vet who prescribes the
          oxygen would also provide instructions for how to use it.

          Okay, so what I got is a plastic storage box, with lid, from Kmart. I
          chose a clear one so the cat can see out and I can see in to monitor
          him if we ever need to use it.

          The vet drew markings showing the location to drill a small hole for
          the oxygen tube to go in (and my housemate then cleverly used a little
          faucet nipple and some washers and a nut to make a nozzle with
          airtight seal for the oxygen tube to fit onto), and other locations to
          cut larger holes for ventilating the carbon dioxide the cat would be
          exhaling and for letting room air in, as breathing pure 100% oxygen
          for an extended length of time can cause damage. I also plan to buy a
          small thermometer to put in the box, to make sure he doesn't get
          overheated.

          That's the basic idea: one hole for oxygen from the tank to go in,
          more and larger holes for ventilation, make sure it doesn't get too
          warm inside. Also, the flow rate for giving oxygen in the box is much
          higher than the flow rate for giving it through a mask.

          Anyone wanting to make one for your own cat, ask your own vet (the one
          who prescribes the oxygen) for specifics on a good box size for your
          cat's body size, locations of oxygen intake and ventilation holes,
          number and size of ventilation holes, and flow rate of oxygen. And
          watch the temperature in there, especially if your cat gets
          hypothermic like Rhapsdy so you put in a heating pad. Make sure it
          doesn't heat up too much.

          Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
        • bubbacat12003
          There are also video clips on youtube. I had many that needed nebulization for respiratory issues and I use a standard pet carrier. I cellophane up the front
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 25, 2013
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            There are also video clips on youtube.

            I had many that needed nebulization for respiratory issues and I use a standard pet carrier. I cellophane up the front grill and side vents and poke the hose thru one of the spaces in the front grill. Works great for nebulization and I bet could also be used for oxygen. My kitties are accustomed to the carrier, so were not at all afraid.

            Jo
            __________________







            -----Original Message-----
            From: Jim Sinclair <jisincla@...>
            To: nyppsi <nyppsi@...>
            Cc: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thu, Apr 25, 2013 3:12 pm
            Subject: Re: [FH] Relief about oxygen tank






            On Wed, Apr 24, 2013 at 4:25 PM, <nyppsi@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Jim Sinclair jisincla@... writes: <<.....I am not going to post
            > specifics because if anyone else is going to make an oxygen cage, I want
            > them to
            > get guidance from their own vet about their own cat instead of copying
            > what
            > the vet here recommended
            > for Rhapsody.)>>
            >
            >
            > Jim,
            >
            > I understand your logic, but in some cases, people whose vets are not
            > knowledgeable about asthma (and MANY MANY vets are not) may need something
            > to
            > use as a talking point when they ask their vet for plans for an oxygen
            > cage/tent.

            Respectfully, if someone's vet is so lacking in knowledge about feline
            asthma that they need information from me to help educate the vet,
            they need to find a new vet! What I know about feline asthma could fit
            on a single page. Double-spaced.

            > While their vet's recommendation (assuming that they even give one) may
            > not
            > be exactly the same as the one your vet/tech gave you, having yours to ask
            > their vet/tech about provides a starting point and gives one something to
            > compare theirs to..

            At least maybe it could give them something to visualize and ask their
            vet about. Since a prescription is required to get a home oxygen tank
            in the first place, I certainly *hope* the vet who prescribes the
            oxygen would also provide instructions for how to use it.

            Okay, so what I got is a plastic storage box, with lid, from Kmart. I
            chose a clear one so the cat can see out and I can see in to monitor
            him if we ever need to use it.

            The vet drew markings showing the location to drill a small hole for
            the oxygen tube to go in (and my housemate then cleverly used a little
            faucet nipple and some washers and a nut to make a nozzle with
            airtight seal for the oxygen tube to fit onto), and other locations to
            cut larger holes for ventilating the carbon dioxide the cat would be
            exhaling and for letting room air in, as breathing pure 100% oxygen
            for an extended length of time can cause damage. I also plan to buy a
            small thermometer to put in the box, to make sure he doesn't get
            overheated.

            That's the basic idea: one hole for oxygen from the tank to go in,
            more and larger holes for ventilation, make sure it doesn't get too
            warm inside. Also, the flow rate for giving oxygen in the box is much
            higher than the flow rate for giving it through a mask.

            Anyone wanting to make one for your own cat, ask your own vet (the one
            who prescribes the oxygen) for specifics on a good box size for your
            cat's body size, locations of oxygen intake and ventilation holes,
            number and size of ventilation holes, and flow rate of oxygen. And
            watch the temperature in there, especially if your cat gets
            hypothermic like Rhapsdy so you put in a heating pad. Make sure it
            doesn't heat up too much.

            Jim Sinclair jisincla@...







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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