Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Anesthesia protocol

Expand Messages
  • Jordan
    Sheba s anesthesia protocol was designed specifically to her and her needs so without giving you her entire cardiac report . . .I will just past the
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 10, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Sheba's anesthesia protocol was designed specifically to her and her needs so without giving you her entire cardiac report . . .I will just past the instructions regarding anesthesia here. However, I would STRONGLY agree that each kitty get their anesthesia protocol from their personal cardiologist, for instances such as mine.

      Heart kitties should ALWAYS have one in case of emergency. So here it is . . .

      Client Instructions: Please monitor for lethargy, anorexia, vomiting and/or diarrhea, acute limb function, collapse or weakness and difficulty breathing. Signs such as these could indicate the progression of the disease and warrant evaluation by a veterinarian. If anesthesia is needed I recommend avoiding episodes of tackycardia, sympathetic augmentation (e.g. no ketamine or atropine) and limiting IV fluids adminstration. I recommend premedication with valium at 0.2-0.3 mg/kg IV and butorphanol at 0.2-0.3 mg/kv IV. Induction can be performed with standard isoflurance or other inhaled gas anesthesia. The ECG, oxygen saturation, and systemic blood pressure should be monitored during the procedure.








      -----Original Message-----
      From: Westgold <westgold@...>
      To: Jordan <thegapgal@...>; feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wed, Apr 10, 2013 10:22 am
      Subject: Re: [FH] Re: Chloe - Serious Dental Issues


      what a wonderful story! You're so right, we have to seek out the best doctors, and then put our faith in them and in God to take care of our little ones. We cannot let them suffer pain. Tooth pain is horrid, I'm sure you know. As scary as it is, you cannot let dear Chloe suffer this pain.

      Jordan, could you please post the protocol your cardiologist gave you, so all of us can keep it in our files in case something comes up suddenly??

      thanks so much.

      take care, Michelle & Tigger Too in Toronto

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Jordan
      To: zan200@...
      Cc: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 12:48 PM
      Subject: [FH] Re: Chloe - Serious Dental Issues





      Hi Suzane,

      I concur with both Lyn and others who state a consideration for proceeding with the dental work.

      I have a 8 (soon to be 9) year old himalayan with feline asthma and unclassified cardiomyopathy. In November 2012, she needed emergency surgery for corneal ulcers in both eyes. She had been battling these ulcers for close to 6 months, and they returned with avengence. The only solutions was corneal grafts in BOTH eyes.

      Sheba was in extreme pain, and the eye specialist stated she needed surgery THAT DAY or risked losing her eyesight. I was forced to make a decision within an hour, and all I could do is provide the eye doctor with the anesthesia protocol from her cardiologist, turn her over, tell her I loved her, and HAVE FAITH!!

      I am pleased to say Sheba had her emergency surgery within hours and did extremely well. There was no incidences whatsoever during her surgery. Nor any post surgerical complications. Her eyes are clear and blue as ever, and she is no longer in pain. So in retrospect, though she IS an anesthesia risk . . . it was the best decision I ever made.

      She is happy, pain free and we continue to manage her feline asthma and heart condition. Heart kittes CAN survive surgery. My cardiologist would have NEVER recommended the surgery, but knowing she was battling corneal ulcers he DID give me a anesthesia protocol, just in case.

      And, I am so glad he did.

      Hugs and kitty kisses,
      Jordan and Sheba

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • s.theye
      H Suzanne, I am sorry that you are having to deal with dental issues with Chloe. My Jack, who has HCM, had a dental last summer. His heart and dental issues
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 10, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        H Suzanne,

        I am sorry that you are having to deal with dental issues with Chloe.

        My Jack, who has HCM, had a dental last summer. His heart and dental issues weren't as severe as Chloe's sound, but I was still really nervous about the anesthesia. I received some great info from this group.

        Adriann sent this very informative post--just in case it might help- here's the link to it.

        http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/feline-heart/message/44789

        I didn't want Jack to have to hang out long at the clinic, so his appt. was first that morning, and I waited in the waiting room and was allowed to sit with him as he woke up until he was stable enough to go home....I also had to take him off of his Plavix before and after the dental. He had 2 forls that were only seen on x-rays, so those teeth were removed.

        Take care,
        Shelley and Jack

        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "zan200" <zan200@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi All,
        >
        > Just wanted to post an update regarding Chloe - Chloe is still experiencing some very serious dental issues - pawing at her mouth (as in my YouTube video post), not wanting to eat on her own, etc.
        >
        > Vet has continued Chloe's Zeniquin (antibiotic) and now has her on Buprenex by mouth for pain - there is nothing that can be done dental-wise without anesthesia and anesthetizing Chloe at this point would be a HUGE risk. There is a veterinary dentist and anesthesiologist in my area that my vet would contact if/when necessary, but it would literally be a life and death issue at that point.
        >
        > Vet thinks both Chloe's lower back molars are involved - possibly FORL's or an infection of the roots below the gums. Chloe does have an acculmulation of tartar there that may be contributing to her problem.
        >
        > I can't believe it's all coming down to this - Chloe's chest x-rays were unchanged from 2 weeks ago - a good sign that her heart meds are continuing to work...but the teeth are really making her miserable.
        >
        > We thankfully were able to successfully give Chloe oral Buprenex - she had a very serious reaction to a Buprenex injection about a month ago and my vet was initially was afraid to try it orally. I was also concerned about any potential drug interactions as Chloe receives 6 different meds (3 heart drugs, antibiotic, appetite stimulant, and now the pain med) multiple times per day, but so far all is OK.
        >
        > Anyone with a heart kitty also experiencing dental issues - I'd be very grateful for any advice on treatment, etc. Specifically, what are you doing to treat the dental problem without compromising the heart?
        >
        > Thanks so much,
        > Suzanne and Chloe
        >
      • Janie
        My vet told me his nurse practicioner did the cleaning but he is there with her and he does the anthesia. He does the extractions and also the other stuff. Now
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 11, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          My vet told me his nurse practicioner did the cleaning but he is there with her and he does the anthesia. He does the extractions and also the other stuff. Now our dentist does not clean our teeth but the dental asst does. We had 3 kitties with HCM. I dont think they were in danger and they were in pretty good condition but we had there teeth fixed as that poison can go to the heart and liver. I think that link someone put on here was good. The dif is I have been with my vet through many crisis and procedures and I trust him and his nurse completly as we have been through so much. I think you have to really know what they are using how it is done and if the kitty is in that much pain you might have to do it. Good luck Janie
        • s.theye
          As a follow up to my earlier post, at our vet clinic it was similar to what Janie wrote. The vet tech did the cleaning, with the vet monitoring the anesthesia
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 12, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            As a follow up to my earlier post, at our vet clinic it was similar to what Janie wrote.
            The vet tech did the cleaning, with the vet monitoring the anesthesia and doing extractions. Our vet told me that this particular tech was very good (and fast)...
            Shelley

            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Janie <sockster@...> wrote:
            >
            > My vet told me his nurse practicioner did the cleaning but he is there with her and he does the anthesia. He does the extractions and also the other stuff. Now our dentist does not clean our teeth but the dental asst does. We had 3 kitties with HCM. I dont think they were in danger and they were in pretty good condition but we had there teeth fixed as that poison can go to the heart and liver. I think that link someone put on here was good. The dif is I have been with my vet through many crisis and procedures and I trust him and his nurse completly as we have been through so much. I think you have to really know what they are using how it is done and if the kitty is in that much pain you might have to do it. Good luck Janie
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.