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Re: Reduced Frusemide... Breathing now Increased.

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  • binarina1
    If since diagnosis his respiratory rate has always been 40-50, and the vet knows this, Then that s where you measure from, if it suddenly became 60 and stayed
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 14, 2013
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      If since diagnosis his respiratory rate has always been 40-50, and the vet knows this, Then that's where you measure from, if it suddenly became 60 and stayed at 60 then that would be a time to worry. I've been lucky that since my cat was diagnosed he was always around 16, so when it shot up to 28 I knew instantly something was wrong. It's just about working out what's normal for your cat and then checking for changes. I know to some of you 28 is nothing, but for my cat it was a big change.

      I have my boy back now, he's back at around 16. No fluid, nothing much changed heart wise, in fact his left ventricle is smaller than it was on diagnosis. The tablets were obviously working, and the change messed everything up. He's back on 40mg a day now.

      She said he looks great, and you'd never guess he was so poorly.

      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "rosemairew20" <rosemariewentz@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > My Baxter is on 25mg a day of Furosimide. 12.5mg in the AM and 12.5mg PM.
      >
      > I'm curious about the Breaths per Minute as well. Last night while he was awake he was around 40-50bpm. Do you only count these when they are asleep or should I be concerned with this rate of breathing during the day. He seemed fine and was active and not doing anything out of the ordinary so I wasn't concerned at the time.
      >
      > I have noticed he gets winded when going potty, the activity of trying to cover his stools or pee seems to make him tired for about 10 minutes and his breathing look a little labored. Should I be concerned by this?
      >
      > --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "hoofbeats95" <hoofbeats95@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I'm curious what the respiration weight of everyone's kitties are? My kitty girl is on 20 mg of lasix twice a day and her breathing is 24-28 bpm on any given night. I don't panic until it's above 30. The last time it was above 30 she was full of fluids. So I'm curious as the original poster is upset with 28 bpm, but I'm chugging along at that range. Should I be expecting a lower rate?
      > >
      > > --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "binarina1" <binarina@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hello Lyn.
      > > >
      > > > He's on Frusemide, cardisure, fortekor, prilactone, clopidogrel and asprin. He's been doing really well on 40mg. But the bloods said otherwise. He's got a pretty bad spasm around his shoulders which is probably because of low potassium. But that was expected to reduce once the frusemide was lowered, but it didnt. I'll have to see what the cardiologist says, but I'm unsure how soon she can see him. I think a mix of frusemide and prilactone might be the way forward. I'll see what she says. I'm going to give him 30mg today. And see how he is tomorrow.
      > > >
      > > > Thanks for your help. Sara.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, elfinmyst@ wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi
      > > > >
      > > > > If he needs 40mg a day to control the heart failure, then unfortunately
      > > > > that's what is needed. A high dose will affect kidney function but the heart
      > > > > has to come first. Trixi was on30mg a day at her worst. Now he is stable on
      > > > > 40mg, you need to find ways to be able to reduce it.
      > > > >
      > > > > There are two options. You could ask for spironolactone to add to the
      > > > > lasix, they work together and spiro isn't as damaging to the kidneys. It would
      > > > > possibly be 10mg lasix plus 6mg spiro twice a day. Or you can ask for
      > > > > something else to help the heart function better so the lasix can be reduced.
      > > > > That could be a beta blocker like atenolol, vetmedin or an ace inhibitor like
      > > > > fortekor. Improving the heart can mean less heart failure and lower lasix.
      > > > >
      > > > > But it is essential that the cardiologist decides which is best. For now
      > > > > you will need to keep that fluid down as the first priority.
      > > > >
      > > > > Lyn
      > > > >
      > > > > _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)
      > > > >
      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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