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Introducing Riley

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  • Laura Bray Ramsower
    Hi everyone, My name is Laura and I am a proud momma to Riley, a sweet 5-year old kitty. Riley s primary care vet recently detected a murmur, so we went for
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 27, 2013
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      Hi everyone,

      My name is Laura and I am a proud momma to Riley, a sweet 5-year old
      kitty. Riley's primary care vet recently detected a murmur, so we went for
      an ECHO this week. The diagnosis is not clear at this point, but the
      cardiologist has two theories and will determine a final diagnosis in 3-4
      months after administering Atenolol and conducting another ECHO.

      From the cardiology report:

      HR 220 bpm, regular rhythm. 3/6 parasternal systolic murmur. Femoral pulses
      strong. Lungs
      clear.

      There is moderate left ventricular concentric hypertrophy with prominent
      papillary muscles and end systolic cavity
      obliteration. The left atrium is normal in size. The right atrium and
      ventricle appear normal. There is systolic anterior
      motion of the mitral valve (SAM) with a significant left ventricular
      outflow tract obstruction gradient. The SAM also causes
      moderate mitral regurgitation. There is dynamic right ventricular outflow
      tract obstruction (DRVOTO).

      Systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve can lead to left ventricular
      thickening, but primary HCM cannot
      be ruled out. Atenolol and recheck echo in 3-4 months will help us to
      determine whether the primary problem is SAM of
      the mitral valve or HCM.

      Systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve
      Left ventricular hypertrophy
      Dynamic right ventricular outflow tract obstruction

      We have started Riley on the Atenolol, but she has only had 2 doses so
      far. We will head back to the vet next week for a heart rate test to
      determine if her dose is the correct dosage to properly slow her heart. I
      don't know much about HCM or other heart conditions, so I don't even know
      what to ask at this point. If you have any insight or guidance on Riley's
      case, I would greatly appreciate it!

      Thanks!
      Laura and Riley


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • elfinmyst
      Hi Laura I am sorry to hear of Riley. Riley s condition is not clear as she doesn t have a thickened left atrium which is diagnostic for HCM. She has a
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 28, 2013
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        Hi Laura

        I am sorry to hear of Riley. Riley's condition is not clear as she doesn't
        have a thickened left atrium which is diagnostic for HCM. She has a
        'flappy valve' which several of my cats have too, SAM means turbulence of the
        blood as it flows through the valves. The SAM is what causes the murmur as well
        as the valve 'flapping'. In my 'flappy' cats they never needed treatment
        and it never got worse but Riley has wall thickening of part of her heart
        which mine didn't have.

        The atenolol will relax the heart and the murmur may disappear. Can you ask
        the cardiologist if Riley is at risk of a bloodclot? If so, I`d seriously
        consider treatment for that or taking nattokinase. There is a lot of
        information about nattokinase here, it dissolves clots in the blood. It's a food
        supplement.

        Consider CoQ at 30mg. All my heart cats take it. Its another food
        supplement which
        helps the heart. Most cats here are on it, but you can't stop it suddenly.
        It's available as Vetriscience Cardiostrength for cats or the health food
        store.

        You need to learn Riley's norma breathing. When she is asleep, count her
        breaths
        over 15 secs, times by 4. Find what looks normal and is normal for her.
        Makes sure she isnt dreaming.
        Watching for changes can quickly tell you if she is starting to enter
        heart
        failure. Up to 30 breaths is normal, 30+ alarm and 40+ generally an
        emergency.

        Lyn


        _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Laura Bray Ramsower
        Lyn, Thank you so much for this information! I will check out her breathing and ask the cardiologist if she is at risk for a blood clot. I will have to look
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 28, 2013
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          Lyn,

          Thank you so much for this information! I will check out her breathing and
          ask the cardiologist if she is at risk for a blood clot. I will have to
          look into the CoQ10. Riley will not take medication, even compounded into
          a yummy liquid. We have tried everything. I am able to trick her into
          taking her atenolol by putting it into a pill pocket since it is such a
          small pill. She is starting to get suspicious of me already, though.

          One question about the atenolol. Riley has been on it since Tuesday
          night. She is acting very frisky and playful. Can the atenolol cause
          hyperactivity? Or could it be that she feels better and now has the desire
          to play?

          Laura and Riley
          On Feb 28, 2013 6:19 AM, <elfinmyst@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Hi Laura
          >
          > I am sorry to hear of Riley. Riley's condition is not clear as she doesn't
          > have a thickened left atrium which is diagnostic for HCM. She has a
          > 'flappy valve' which several of my cats have too, SAM means turbulence of
          > the
          > blood as it flows through the valves. The SAM is what causes the murmur as
          > well
          > as the valve 'flapping'. In my 'flappy' cats they never needed treatment
          > and it never got worse but Riley has wall thickening of part of her heart
          > which mine didn't have.
          >
          > The atenolol will relax the heart and the murmur may disappear. Can you
          > ask
          > the cardiologist if Riley is at risk of a bloodclot? If so, I`d seriously
          > consider treatment for that or taking nattokinase. There is a lot of
          > information about nattokinase here, it dissolves clots in the blood. It's
          > a food
          > supplement.
          >
          > Consider CoQ at 30mg. All my heart cats take it. Its another food
          > supplement which
          > helps the heart. Most cats here are on it, but you can't stop it suddenly.
          > It's available as Vetriscience Cardiostrength for cats or the health food
          > store.
          >
          > You need to learn Riley's norma breathing. When she is asleep, count her
          > breaths
          > over 15 secs, times by 4. Find what looks normal and is normal for her.
          > Makes sure she isnt dreaming.
          > Watching for changes can quickly tell you if she is starting to enter
          > heart
          > failure. Up to 30 breaths is normal, 30+ alarm and 40+ generally an
          > emergency.
          >
          > Lyn
          >
          >
          > _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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