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Re: [FH] Atenolol question.....

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  • joanne marbut
    An HCM cat should use both atenolol and enalapril. Atenolol affects heart muscle, slowing down the beating of the heart.  The bp is lowered; the heart doesn t
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 26, 2012
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      An HCM cat should use both atenolol and enalapril. Atenolol affects heart muscle, slowing down the beating of the heart.  The bp is lowered; the heart doesn't have to work as hard to pump; it's much better for the heart.  Enalapril keeps blood veins opened if there was to be a heart attack; keeps veins from being constricted and therefore lowers bp; helps heart performance in how it affects blood veins.  So, both meds lower bp but in different ways.  Both are necessary for a heart patient.



      >________________________________
      > From: Karen Plasket <slammerfold@...>
      >To: jknsk2002@...; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      >Sent: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 11:19 AM
      >Subject: Re: [FH] Atenolol question.....
      >
      >

      >
      >Hi Susan,
      >A lot of cardiologists (and some progressive regular vets) will put a cat on Atenolol when they have mild HCM and a slight murmur...a lot of doctors have had the murmurs disappear once the cat is on Atenolol. My own HCM cat is on Atenolol, with great results, and most times his doctor can't hear a murmur at all (even with his congestive heart failure). Atenolol lowers the heart rate, so my cat's doctor judges by the heart rate that Atenolol is doing its job, plus no clinical symptoms, and his echo remains stable. Definitely do not take him off Atenolol abruptly...I learned that the hard way when I missed several doses 4 years ago with my cat. He ended up collapsing, and I was fortunate I didn't lose him.
      >Is Oreo still on Enalapril? Even with the atenolol?
      >Karen Plasket, DVM
      >
      >-----Original Message-----
      >From: Susan <jknsk2002@...>
      >To: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
      >Sent: Tue, Dec 25, 2012 11:19 pm
      >Subject: [FH] Atenolol question.....
      >
      >oreo was put on Atenolol, 3 months ago due to a newely detected arrhythmia . He went in for a dental and the ecg showed an arrhythmia & cancelled the dental because of that (plus elevated bp, he's on enalpril)until I had clearance from his cardiologist. He has had mild HCT for 15-16 years, unchanged. Current echo was good, a low grade / mild HCT. (no prior arrhythmia until this year. He's had a regular routine of echo's since birth.
      >My question is this, the cardiologist and his main doctor put him on atenolol, we successfully completed the dental. Now, how do I know if the atenolol is doing it's job ? Is there a test ALONE that will show progress on the medication, or is this just something he's supposed to be on with this issue ??? How would I ever know if the 1/4 of the pill twice daily is working ?
      >Thanks
      >Susan
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Karen Plasket
      Not necessarily...only 50% of cats with hypertension respond to enalapril, and ACE inhibitors (like Enalapril) are not considered a primary treatment today for
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 26, 2012
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        Not necessarily...only 50% of cats with hypertension respond to enalapril, and ACE inhibitors (like Enalapril) are not considered a primary treatment today for hypertension in cats (it is primarily used in dogs). About 12 years ago, Enalapril was used more in cats. However, today, Enalapril can benefit cats with renal disease, as can Benazepril. You should also use it cautiously when using other hypotensive drugs and diurectics.
        Karen Plasket, DVM

        -----Original Message-----
        From: joanne marbut <jomarbut@...>
        To: Karen Plasket <slammerfold@...>; jknsk2002 <jknsk2002@...>; feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wed, Dec 26, 2012 9:24 pm
        Subject: Re: [FH] Atenolol question.....



        An HCM cat should use both atenolol and enalapril. Atenolol affects heart muscle, slowing down the beating of the heart. The bp is lowered; the heart doesn't have to work as hard to pump; it's much better for the heart. Enalapril keeps blood veins opened if there was to be a heart attack; keeps veins from being constricted and therefore lowers bp; helps heart performance in how it affects blood veins. So, both meds lower bp but in different ways. Both are necessary for a heart patient.






        From: Karen Plasket <slammerfold@...>
        To: jknsk2002@...; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 11:19 AM
        Subject: Re: [FH] Atenolol question.....








        Hi Susan,
        A lot of cardiologists (and some progressive regular vets) will put a cat on Atenolol when they have mild HCM and a slight murmur...a lot of doctors have had the murmurs disappear once the cat is on Atenolol. My own HCM cat is on Atenolol, with great results, and most times his doctor can't hear a murmur at all (even with his congestive heart failure). Atenolol lowers the heart rate, so my cat's doctor judges by the heart rate that Atenolol is doing its job, plus no clinical symptoms, and his echo remains stable. Definitely do not take him off Atenolol abruptly...I learned that the hard way when I missed several doses 4 years ago with my cat. He ended up collapsing, and I was fortunate I didn't lose him.
        Is Oreo still on Enalapril? Even with the atenolol?
        Karen Plasket, DVM

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Susan <jknsk2002@...>
        To: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tue, Dec 25, 2012 11:19 pm
        Subject: [FH] Atenolol question.....

        oreo was put on Atenolol, 3 months ago due to a newely detected arrhythmia . He went in for a dental and the ecg showed an arrhythmia & cancelled the dental because of that (plus elevated bp, he's on enalpril)until I had clearance from his cardiologist. He has had mild HCT for 15-16 years, unchanged. Current echo was good, a low grade / mild HCT. (no prior arrhythmia until this year. He's had a regular routine of echo's since birth.
        My question is this, the cardiologist and his main doctor put him on atenolol, we successfully completed the dental. Now, how do I know if the atenolol is doing it's job ? Is there a test ALONE that will show progress on the medication, or is this just something he's supposed to be on with this issue ??? How would I ever know if the 1/4 of the pill twice daily is working ?
        Thanks
        Susan

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • r schu
        May was put on atenolol in July after fluid in the lungs, she has minor hcm, and a minor murmur. It seemed to immediately slow her heart down. Though more
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 27, 2012
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          May was put on atenolol in July after fluid in the lungs, she has minor hcm, and a minor murmur. It seemed to immediately slow her heart down. Though more was prescribed, I give her 1/6 of a 25mg tablet morning and night, so 1/3 tab per day total. If her rate goes up I will increase to 1/4 tab twice a day, for a total of 12.5mg per day.

          -Lee and May
          ==============================
          6a Re: Atenolol question..... Wed Dec 26, 2012 2:37 pm (PST) . Posted by: "Rose Pike" rosepike@... Rufus was placed on atenolol 25 mg 1/2 tablet daily about 6 years ago for his HCM. He also takes a compounded dose of verapamil daily. Since being on these 2 medications, he has improved significantly. His murmur was originally a 4/6 and subsequent echo showed it to be at least 2/6, but at his last echo about 2 months ago the cardiologist could barely detect a murmur. So, to answer your question as to whether the medication is helping, I would say it DEFINITELY is helping. There is no other explanation for the improvement in Rufus' echo over the years other than the medication he is taking and the love and care he gets from his humans. Please do not take Oreo off the atenolol.
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