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Re: [FH] Saddle Thrombus - URGENT NEED HELP ASAP!!!!

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  • Lynn
    I reading this jogged my memory. When my cat had CHF, HCM and then saddle thrombosis, he was on daily aspirin as part of his medication.  I wonder if this
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 8, 2012
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      I reading this jogged my memory. When my cat had CHF, HCM and then saddle thrombosis, he was on daily aspirin as part of his medication.  I wonder if this would help? He regained use of his legs and is still here at 19 years old 8 years after this! 

      Praying for a miracle for Indy.

      Lynn

      --- On Sat, 12/8/12, acrocat@... <acrocat@...> wrote:

      From: acrocat@... <acrocat@...>
      Subject: Re: [FH] Saddle Thrombus - URGENT NEED HELP ASAP!!!!
      To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, December 8, 2012, 5:10 PM
















       









      Re: the use of heparin etc.



      Just to clarify, heparin does not dissolve the clot. Its use (usually in a specific form called fractionated or low molecular weight heparin) in clot cats is meant to keep the clot from getting bigger, and to help prevent other clots from forming. Whether it works for this purpose is not definitively known.



      The only clot-busting agent used in these cases would be streptokinase. It is really almost never used in cats because it is expensive (too expensive to keep in stock) and quite high-risk. It breaks up clots indiscriminately (we make 'appropriate' clots all the time) and there is a high risk of reperfusion injury--what Kendra referred to in the below snippet. Unless one is there to witness the clot event and immediately transport the cat to the vet, there is a risk of fatal reperfusion injury if streptokinase is used. The treatment for saddle thrombus is mainly supportive -- pain meds, use of LMW heparin to help stave off further clot formation, treatment of CHF if it occurs at the same time, and monitoring for reperfusion injury. The body can break the clot down, and if it happens soon enough after the clot is formed, the leg(s) can be saved. However, a cat who throws one clot is extremely likely to have another, so the reprieve may be short-lived.



      Adriann






















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