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I'm new! Intro and question

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  • hoofbeats95
    Hello! I m new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
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      Hello!

      I'm new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was stressed at the groomer 2 days prior. Unfortunately it took a while to come to the heart failure diagnosis. After 3 1/2 days in ICU, she came home and has been recovering nicely.

      She is on lasix. We started that once a day, but I have increased it two twice a day as her breathing has not sounded well in the evening even though the respiration rate has seemed normal. She is also on benazepril I believe and the generic plavix. I don't have the meds with me to confirm the names.

      I tried pill poppers and she ate 2 of them in the AM 2 days in a row. The third day she ate one and then went to play hide and seek. Pilling her is becoming quite the chore. She is extremely picky. There is not a treat that I've found that she eats regularly. She doesn't eat "people" food, so she turns up her nose at tuna, chicken and cheese. She has had IBS symptoms before and is normally on a very strict diet. But during recovery she has had access to all kinds of food in order to get her to eat and also to get liquid into her. I just ordered some Flavor-Doh and Lean Treats to try that route. But I don't have much hope. I also ordered gelatin capsules so that if I have to pill her I can do just one capsule in the AM rather than three pills. I would take any advice about how to best get the meds in her, in the most stress free way. I'd give anything for her to be less picky.

      I look forward to learning more from everyone and traveling this road with some help. :)

      Thanks!
    • Westgold
      hi -- the most stress-free way is to have the meds compounded into liquid form, and then mix them into the food. But I guess some cannot be done that way,
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
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        hi -- the most stress-free way is to have the meds compounded into liquid form, and then mix them into the food. But I guess some cannot be done that way, you'll have to talk to a compounding pharmacist. I give Tigger the beef-flavored liquid atenolol and also his lysine for herpes in his canned food , and he doesn't even know it's there. If you have to corner them and wrap them up in order to give a pill, that is extremely stressful. But if you have a friend who can hold them gently & firmly, so you can pry the mouth open and throw the pills in, that might work, that depends on the cat.

        take care -- Michelle & Tigger Too in Toronto
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: hoofbeats95
        To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 1:44 PM
        Subject: [FH] I'm new! Intro and question



        Hello!

        I'm new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was stressed at the groomer 2 days prior. Unfortunately it took a while to come to the heart failure diagnosis. After 3 1/2 days in ICU, she came home and has been recovering nicely.

        She is on lasix. We started that once a day, but I have increased it two twice a day as her breathing has not sounded well in the evening even though the respiration rate has seemed normal. She is also on benazepril I believe and the generic plavix. I don't have the meds with me to confirm the names.

        I tried pill poppers and she ate 2 of them in the AM 2 days in a row. The third day she ate one and then went to play hide and seek. Pilling her is becoming quite the chore. She is extremely picky. There is not a treat that I've found that she eats regularly. She doesn't eat "people" food, so she turns up her nose at tuna, chicken and cheese. She has had IBS symptoms before and is normally on a very strict diet. But during recovery she has had access to all kinds of food in order to get her to eat and also to get liquid into her. I just ordered some Flavor-Doh and Lean Treats to try that route. But I don't have much hope. I also ordered gelatin capsules so that if I have to pill her I can do just one capsule in the AM rather than three pills. I would take any advice about how to best get the meds in her, in the most stress free way. I'd give anything for her to be less picky.

        I look forward to learning more from everyone and traveling this road with some help. :)

        Thanks!





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lee Evans
        Hi, I usually lurk on this list.  At this time, thank the Goddess, I don t have a cat with heart disease but I do have a cat with seizure disorder, which is
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 6, 2012
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          Hi, I usually lurk on this list.  At this time, thank the Goddess, I don't have a cat with heart disease but I do have a cat with seizure disorder, which is something like epilepsy in humans.  When he was first diagnosed, it was easy to pill him.  I just gave him a good petting, then pulled his mouth open and plopped the pill way down his throat. No problem, but that was when he was living by himself in a room separate from the other cats because of his bizarre behavior (until he was diagnosed and I knew it was not something contagious).  Now that he's with the whole gang, he doesn't let me do that.  And he wasn't very interested in yummy cat treats either.  But a friend  suggested ice cream.  Vanilla ice cream. I tried a tablespoon of it without the pill and he loved it.  Now he takes his little phenobarbital dose without any problems.  However, his pill time has turned into an ice cream social.  Some of his buddies also love vanilla ice
          cream so I have to give  another larger plate with tablespoonfuls to them.  Evening ice cream social.  It won't give your cat diarrhea either since it's such a tiny portion but since she had IBS you might want to ask your vet before using the ice cream/pill method. Good luck to  you and Sophie.


           
          Spay and Neuter your cats and dogs and your weird relatives and nasty neighbors too!

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jillym74
          Hello- Oh....I have been down this road before and my best advice is compounding medications into a liquid form. In fact, I wrote a blog post about it! I
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 6, 2012
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            Hello-

            Oh....I have been down this road before and my best advice is compounding medications into a liquid form. In fact, I wrote a blog post about it! I provide more information on the subject in this post. With a HCM kitty, keeping them calm is crucial. Yet, they need to take their meds and precisely on time too! So finding the calmest, stress-free way of medicating her will be a relief for everyone involved :)

            Here is the link: Salmon Sarah....and Maya: Medicating the impossible cat...help!!

            http://salmonsarahstuff.blogspot.com/2012/08/medicating-impossible-cathelp.html?spref=tw

            I'm sorry your little baby has HCM. I hope you find a solution soon.

            Sarah

            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "hoofbeats95" <hoofbeats95@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello!
            >
            > I'm new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was stressed at the groomer 2 days prior. Unfortunately it took a while to come to the heart failure diagnosis. After 3 1/2 days in ICU, she came home and has been recovering nicely.
            >
            > She is on lasix. We started that once a day, but I have increased it two twice a day as her breathing has not sounded well in the evening even though the respiration rate has seemed normal. She is also on benazepril I believe and the generic plavix. I don't have the meds with me to confirm the names.
            >
            > I tried pill poppers and she ate 2 of them in the AM 2 days in a row. The third day she ate one and then went to play hide and seek. Pilling her is becoming quite the chore. She is extremely picky. There is not a treat that I've found that she eats regularly. She doesn't eat "people" food, so she turns up her nose at tuna, chicken and cheese. She has had IBS symptoms before and is normally on a very strict diet. But during recovery she has had access to all kinds of food in order to get her to eat and also to get liquid into her. I just ordered some Flavor-Doh and Lean Treats to try that route. But I don't have much hope. I also ordered gelatin capsules so that if I have to pill her I can do just one capsule in the AM rather than three pills. I would take any advice about how to best get the meds in her, in the most stress free way. I'd give anything for her to be less picky.
            >
            > I look forward to learning more from everyone and traveling this road with some help. :)
            >
            > Thanks!
            >
          • Toby Jones
            I had a picky kitty too; he wouldn t eat chicken, turkey, tuna, wet cat food, etc.  Compounding/liquid meds became impossible as we were doing seven meds at
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 6, 2012
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              I had a picky kitty too; he wouldn't eat chicken, turkey, tuna, wet cat food, etc.  Compounding/liquid meds became impossible as we were doing seven meds at one point multiple times per day, and he was done after the first one.

              What worked for us was wrapping the pills in 1/4 to 1/2 of a Pill Pocket.  We still had to force pill him, but at least that way he would choke them down and wouldn't spit them out at us.  Try the turkey flavored ones.

              Best of luck.

              Ryan



              ________________________________
              From: hoofbeats95 <hoofbeats95@...>
              To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2012 10:44 AM
              Subject: [FH] I'm new! Intro and question


               
              Hello!

              I'm new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was stressed at the groomer 2 days prior. Unfortunately it took a while to come to the heart failure diagnosis. After 3 1/2 days in ICU, she came home and has been recovering nicely.

              She is on lasix. We started that once a day, but I have increased it two twice a day as her breathing has not sounded well in the evening even though the respiration rate has seemed normal. She is also on benazepril I believe and the generic plavix. I don't have the meds with me to confirm the names.

              I tried pill poppers and she ate 2 of them in the AM 2 days in a row. The third day she ate one and then went to play hide and seek. Pilling her is becoming quite the chore. She is extremely picky. There is not a treat that I've found that she eats regularly. She doesn't eat "people" food, so she turns up her nose at tuna, chicken and cheese. She has had IBS symptoms before and is normally on a very strict diet. But during recovery she has had access to all kinds of food in order to get her to eat and also to get liquid into her. I just ordered some Flavor-Doh and Lean Treats to try that route. But I don't have much hope. I also ordered gelatin capsules so that if I have to pill her I can do just one capsule in the AM rather than three pills. I would take any advice about how to best get the meds in her, in the most stress free way. I'd give anything for her to be less picky.

              I look forward to learning more from everyone and traveling this road with some help. :)

              Thanks!




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Anthony GuerreroSoto
              Our HCM kitty (Pablo) takes several meds every day including Plavix and atenolol. He recently turned 9 years old; he was diagnosed at 2. His annual
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 6, 2012
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                Our HCM kitty (Pablo) takes several meds every day including Plavix and atenolol. He recently turned 9 years old; he was diagnosed at 2. His annual cardiologist visit in June showed that his HCM progressed significantly since the last 7 years. Until now his HCM did not get any worse -- some years it reversed its damage (only a little). Please keep us in your prayers.

                The atenolol can be compounded into liquid or chewable tablets. Both come in several flavors like chicken and seafood. He likes the chewable tablets.

                However, Plavix (generic too) is bitter when it's cut or compounded. The pill is coated in a pink like material. To my knowledge there is no Plavix pill the size/dosage for cats to take - because Plavix is made for humans we have to cut the smallest Plavix pill into 4 parts. He takes 1/4 pill twice daily. The exposed part of the cut pill must be covered somehow.

                A long time ago, we compounded Plavix once into liquid and gave it to him via a plastic syringe - oh my, he foamed at the mouth and smacked as a dog with a mouth full of peanut butter. Except with excessive foam. It was the bitter taste. We added water and it only got worse. He was mad at us for a while and developed a phobia to meds!

                So we ended up putting the 1/4 Plavix pill inside a clear gel cap and manually pilled him. Given the need to manually pill him, we add the atenolol in the gel cap too (both fit). Because he is manually pilled 2x a day, he is now accustom to it.

                Our cardiologist told me that using the Greenie pill pockets or other like brands is not suggested for HCM kitties. We use to give him the pills via the Greenies for probably the first 5 years. Had we known what we know now, we would have pilled him manually a long time ago.

                Talk to your vet about using Greenies, cat treats, etc. avoid at all possible costs. Years of these treats can't be helpful to a heart with HCM.

                Let us know if you have any other ideas.

                Sorry for any typos as I'm writing from my iPhone.

                Sent from my iPhone

                On Sep 5, 2012, at 10:44 AM, hoofbeats95 <hoofbeats95@...> wrote:

                > Hello!
                >
                > I'm new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was stressed at the groomer 2 days prior. Unfortunately it took a while to come to the heart failure diagnosis. After 3 1/2 days in ICU, she came home and has been recovering nicely.
                >
                > She is on lasix. We started that once a day, but I have increased it two twice a day as her breathing has not sounded well in the evening even though the respiration rate has seemed normal. She is also on benazepril I believe and the generic plavix. I don't have the meds with me to confirm the names.
                >
                > I tried pill poppers and she ate 2 of them in the AM 2 days in a row. The third day she ate one and then went to play hide and seek. Pilling her is becoming quite the chore. She is extremely picky. There is not a treat that I've found that she eats regularly. She doesn't eat "people" food, so she turns up her nose at tuna, chicken and cheese. She has had IBS symptoms before and is normally on a very strict diet. But during recovery she has had access to all kinds of food in order to get her to eat and also to get liquid into her. I just ordered some Flavor-Doh and Lean Treats to try that route. But I don't have much hope. I also ordered gelatin capsules so that if I have to pill her I can do just one capsule in the AM rather than three pills. I would take any advice about how to best get the meds in her, in the most stress free way. I'd give anything for her to be less picky.
                >
                > I look forward to learning more from everyone and traveling this road with some help. :)
                >
                > Thanks!
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jordan
                I feel your pain. I cannot pill my cat either. She also has Feline Asthma and any attempt to syringe liquid meds or pilling her triggers asthma attacks.
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 6, 2012
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                  I feel your pain. I cannot pill my cat either. She also has Feline Asthma and any attempt to syringe liquid meds or pilling her triggers asthma attacks.


                  Most times I can find success with pill pockets. But occasionally, she won't even do that. So in those instances, I mix the pills into her food. It is a tricky dance though.


                  I recently saw on a Pet Med website (I cannot recall which one unfortunately) that one of the heart meds, does come in a transdermal gel applied to the skin.


                  Good luck,
                  Jordan and Sheba


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Laurie Stead
                  Why does the cardiologist say pill-pockets are not good for heart kitties?  I am shocked to read that since our cardiologist is fully aware of Boo getting the
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 7, 2012
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                    Why does the cardiologist say pill-pockets are not good for heart kitties?  I am shocked to read that since our cardiologist is fully aware of Boo getting the pill-pockets and lots of them due to the amount of pills she is on.  It makes the experience completely stress-free for her too, since she loves them!

                    You write "Talk to your vet about using Greenies, cat treats, etc. avoid at all
                    possible costs. Years of these treats can't be helpful to a heart with
                    HCM.".  Are you blaming them for the progression of the disease? 

                    Laurie and Boo



                    --- On Thu, 9/6/12, Anthony GuerreroSoto <guerrerosoto@...> wrote:

                    From: Anthony GuerreroSoto <guerrerosoto@...>
                    Subject: Re: [FH] I'm new! Intro and question
                    To: "hoofbeats95" <hoofbeats95@...>
                    Cc: "feline-heart@yahoogroups.com" <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Thursday, September 6, 2012, 10:16 PM
















                     









                    Our HCM kitty (Pablo) takes several meds every day including Plavix and atenolol. He recently turned 9 years old; he was diagnosed at 2. His annual cardiologist visit in June showed that his HCM progressed significantly since the last 7 years. Until now his HCM did not get any worse -- some years it reversed its damage (only a little). Please keep us in your prayers.



                    The atenolol can be compounded into liquid or chewable tablets. Both come in several flavors like chicken and seafood. He likes the chewable tablets.



                    However, Plavix (generic too) is bitter when it's cut or compounded. The pill is coated in a pink like material. To my knowledge there is no Plavix pill the size/dosage for cats to take - because Plavix is made for humans we have to cut the smallest Plavix pill into 4 parts. He takes 1/4 pill twice daily. The exposed part of the cut pill must be covered somehow.



                    A long time ago, we compounded Plavix once into liquid and gave it to him via a plastic syringe - oh my, he foamed at the mouth and smacked as a dog with a mouth full of peanut butter. Except with excessive foam. It was the bitter taste. We added water and it only got worse. He was mad at us for a while and developed a phobia to meds!



                    So we ended up putting the 1/4 Plavix pill inside a clear gel cap and manually pilled him. Given the need to manually pill him, we add the atenolol in the gel cap too (both fit). Because he is manually pilled 2x a day, he is now accustom to it.



                    Our cardiologist told me that using the Greenie pill pockets or other like brands is not suggested for HCM kitties. We use to give him the pills via the Greenies for probably the first 5 years. Had we known what we know now, we would have pilled him manually a long time ago.



                    Talk to your vet about using Greenies, cat treats, etc. avoid at all possible costs. Years of these treats can't be helpful to a heart with HCM.



                    Let us know if you have any other ideas.



                    Sorry for any typos as I'm writing from my iPhone.



                    Sent from my iPhone



                    On Sep 5, 2012, at 10:44 AM, hoofbeats95 <hoofbeats95@...> wrote:



                    > Hello!

                    >

                    > I'm new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was stressed at the groomer 2 days prior. Unfortunately it took a while to come to the heart failure diagnosis. After 3 1/2 days in ICU, she came home and has been recovering nicely.

                    >

                    > She is on lasix. We started that once a day, but I have increased it two twice a day as her breathing has not sounded well in the evening even though the respiration rate has seemed normal. She is also on benazepril I believe and the generic plavix. I don't have the meds with me to confirm the names.

                    >

                    > I tried pill poppers and she ate 2 of them in the AM 2 days in a row. The third day she ate one and then went to play hide and seek. Pilling her is becoming quite the chore. She is extremely picky. There is not a treat that I've found that she eats regularly. She doesn't eat "people" food, so she turns up her nose at tuna, chicken and cheese. She has had IBS symptoms before and is normally on a very strict diet. But during recovery she has had access to all kinds of food in order to get her to eat and also to get liquid into her. I just ordered some Flavor-Doh and Lean Treats to try that route. But I don't have much hope. I also ordered gelatin capsules so that if I have to pill her I can do just one capsule in the AM rather than three pills. I would take any advice about how to best get the meds in her, in the most stress free way. I'd give anything for her to be less picky.

                    >

                    > I look forward to learning more from everyone and traveling this road with some help. :)

                    >

                    > Thanks!

                    >

                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



























                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • kateydiddles29
                    I too give my HCM cat his Enalapril in a pill pocket each day. Would love to hear more about why your cardiologist thinks they are not good. Thanks! Karen and
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 7, 2012
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                      I too give my HCM cat his Enalapril in a pill pocket each day. Would love to hear more about why your cardiologist thinks they are not good.

                      Thanks!

                      Karen and Zax


                      --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Laurie Stead <kittykatwhiskas@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Why does the cardiologist say pill-pockets are not good for heart kitties?  I am shocked to read that since our cardiologist is fully aware of Boo getting the pill-pockets and lots of them due to the amount of pills she is on.  It makes the experience completely stress-free for her too, since she loves them!
                      >
                      > You write "Talk to your vet about using Greenies, cat treats, etc. avoid at all
                      > possible costs. Years of these treats can't be helpful to a heart with
                      > HCM.".  Are you blaming them for the progression of the disease? 
                      >
                      > Laurie and Boo
                      >
                    • elise eisfelder
                      Most transdermals don t work as well as pills. I put the pill pieces in gel capsules and chase with a syringe of Gerbers meat only stage 2 baby food. The cat
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 7, 2012
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                        Most transdermals don't work as well as pills. I put the pill pieces in gel capsules and chase with a syringe of Gerbers meat only stage 2 baby food. The cat size are # 3 or 4 and I get them from thrivingpets.com.

                        Elise

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • elfinmyst@aol.com
                        Hello I am sorry to hear Sophie is poorly. Now you have a diagnosis there are things you can do to help her. Her pills will support her heart, prevent blood
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 7, 2012
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                          Hello


                          I am sorry to hear Sophie is poorly. Now you have a diagnosis there are
                          things you can do to help her. Her pills will support her heart, prevent blood
                          clots and remove fluid off her lungs. Lasix lasts about 8 hours so needs
                          to be given more than once a day, and maybe your cardiologist will increase
                          the dose at first to help her until the benazepril works.

                          You can also give her Coenzyme Q, a food supplement that a lot of our
                          kitties are on. My Trixi was diagnosed at 12 weeks old and has been on her pills
                          and CoQ for 6 years now, despite being given months to live.

                          Count her breaths at rest. That means when sleeping or dozing, but not
                          dreaming. That's how to learn what is normal. Normal is up to 30. 30+ is time
                          to call the vet and 40+ is an emergency is what I was told. If she is lying
                          on her side, that's a good sign, heart failure cats often sit up with their
                          heads forward and there breathing is different to normal.

                          Lyn:)

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Anthony Guerrero-Soto
                          Based on my notes from his 6/19/12 visit, Pablo s cardiologist said that he should be on a restricted sodium diet. They asked me to avoid things like Pounce
                          Message 12 of 12 , Sep 10, 2012
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                            Based on my notes from his 6/19/12 visit, Pablo's cardiologist said that he should be on a restricted sodium diet. They asked me to avoid things like Pounce treats, Greenie products, basically all treats, and processed meats because they are high in sodium. He is now on a prescribed food. He was eating Halo before. We did use Greenie pill pockets before but not any more. Obviously, getting meds is more important than no meds if Greenies is the only way to go.

                            CONTEXT
                            In his 7 years with HCM, I never thought to even ask the vet about OTC cat treats and whether they were "good" or "bad." When he was first diagnosed in 2005 the cardiologist did say that there are foods for HCM kitties but that given our house has multiple cats, it was not as important for him to eat the prescription food at that time. Our other cats do not have HCM. Because they are all grazing kitties, it was hard to separate the foods. As of June, we certainly made dramatic changes so that all 4 cats get their appropriate food.

                            The cardiologist in June (a different one from 2005) said that HCM kitties should be on a restricted sodium diet from day one as all the unnecessary sodium may progress HCM faster. Given that Pablo's condition has become "symptomatic" this year (that is, based upon the presence of a "very dilated left atrium"), perhaps the cardiologist is recommending we take these steps now. Before this year, he was "asymptomatic" (that is, little dilation). As of June 2012, the cardiologist said that Pablo is at risk for congestive heart failure and a clot event. We have never been told that Pablo was at immediate risk for these things until June 2012. In fact, until this year we treated Pablo's HCM as another chronic thing and did not see it much different than anything else.

                            The cardiologist said that eating such foods (e.g., Greenies) does not help and only makes this worse. She gave me only a couple of foods that are acceptable for Pablo (both come in dry and wet). Again, I am not sure if this is only because of the stage of Pabo's HCM or whether doing a restricted sodium diet before he got to this stage would have prolonged his "asymptomatic stage" - I guess we will never know.

                            We have seen about 4 different cardiologists in the past 7 years and the cardiologist we visited on 6/19/12 in Grapevine, TX was the first to tell us to count his breaths. Is this solely because of his stage of HCM?

                            Ask your vet about the Greenies and non-cardio friendly cat food, especially if your cat is at the point of congestive heart failure and/or a clot.

                            I hope this helps,
                            Anthony

                            On Sep 7, 2012, at 5:28 AM, Laurie Stead wrote:

                            > Why does the cardiologist say pill-pockets are not good for heart kitties? I am shocked to read that since our cardiologist is fully aware of Boo getting the pill-pockets and lots of them due to the amount of pills she is on. It makes the experience completely stress-free for her too, since she loves them!
                            >
                            > You write "Talk to your vet about using Greenies, cat treats, etc. avoid at all possible costs. Years of these treats can't be helpful to a heart with HCM.". Are you blaming them for the progression of the disease?
                            >
                            > Laurie and Boo
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --- On Thu, 9/6/12, Anthony GuerreroSoto <guerrerosoto@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > From: Anthony GuerreroSoto <guerrerosoto@...>
                            > Subject: Re: [FH] I'm new! Intro and question
                            > To: "hoofbeats95" <hoofbeats95@...>
                            > Cc: "feline-heart@yahoogroups.com" <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                            > Date: Thursday, September 6, 2012, 10:16 PM
                            >
                            > Our HCM kitty (Pablo) takes several meds every day including Plavix and atenolol. He recently turned 9 years old; he was diagnosed at 2. His annual cardiologist visit in June showed that his HCM progressed significantly since the last 7 years. Until now his HCM did not get any worse -- some years it reversed its damage (only a little). Please keep us in your prayers.
                            >
                            > The atenolol can be compounded into liquid or chewable tablets. Both come in several flavors like chicken and seafood. He likes the chewable tablets.
                            >
                            > However, Plavix (generic too) is bitter when it's cut or compounded. The pill is coated in a pink like material. To my knowledge there is no Plavix pill the size/dosage for cats to take - because Plavix is made for humans we have to cut the smallest Plavix pill into 4 parts. He takes 1/4 pill twice daily. The exposed part of the cut pill must be covered somehow.
                            >
                            > A long time ago, we compounded Plavix once into liquid and gave it to him via a plastic syringe - oh my, he foamed at the mouth and smacked as a dog with a mouth full of peanut butter. Except with excessive foam. It was the bitter taste. We added water and it only got worse. He was mad at us for a while and developed a phobia to meds!
                            >
                            > So we ended up putting the 1/4 Plavix pill inside a clear gel cap and manually pilled him. Given the need to manually pill him, we add the atenolol in the gel cap too (both fit). Because he is manually pilled 2x a day, he is now accustom to it.
                            >
                            > Our cardiologist told me that using the Greenie pill pockets or other like brands is not suggested for HCM kitties. We use to give him the pills via the Greenies for probably the first 5 years. Had we known what we know now, we would have pilled him manually a long time ago.
                            >
                            > Talk to your vet about using Greenies, cat treats, etc. avoid at all possible costs. Years of these treats can't be helpful to a heart with HCM.
                            >
                            > Let us know if you have any other ideas.
                            >
                            > Sorry for any typos as I'm writing from my iPhone.
                            >
                            > Sent from my iPhone
                            >
                            > On Sep 5, 2012, at 10:44 AM, hoofbeats95 <hoofbeats95@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > Hello!
                            > >
                            > > I'm new here and my cat Sophie (9 years old) was diagnosed with heart failure (HCM) on August 22nd. Her heart disease was not diagnosed and she was stressed at the groomer 2 days prior. Unfortunately it took a while to come to the heart failure diagnosis. After 3 1/2 days in ICU, she came home and has been recovering nicely.
                            > >
                            > > She is on lasix. We started that once a day, but I have increased it two twice a day as her breathing has not sounded well in the evening even though the respiration rate has seemed normal. She is also on benazepril I believe and the generic plavix. I don't have the meds with me to confirm the names.
                            > >
                            > > I tried pill poppers and she ate 2 of them in the AM 2 days in a row. The third day she ate one and then went to play hide and seek. Pilling her is becoming quite the chore. She is extremely picky. There is not a treat that I've found that she eats regularly. She doesn't eat "people" food, so she turns up her nose at tuna, chicken and cheese. She has had IBS symptoms before and is normally on a very strict diet. But during recovery she has had access to all kinds of food in order to get her to eat and also to get liquid into her. I just ordered some Flavor-Doh and Lean Treats to try that route. But I don't have much hope. I also ordered gelatin capsules so that if I have to pill her I can do just one capsule in the AM rather than three pills. I would take any advice about how to best get the meds in her, in the most stress free way. I'd give anything for her to be less picky.
                            > >
                            > > I look forward to learning more from everyone and traveling this road with some help. :)
                            > >
                            > > Thanks!
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
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                            >
                            >



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