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I am looking for information about RESTRICTIVE cardiomyopathy

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  • k_humphrey
    I was not able to find a document that discussed this. My specific question is about cause. All I had ever heard was dietary deficiency. Is there a genetic
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 17, 2012
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      I was not able to find a document that discussed this.

      My specific question is about cause. All I had ever heard was dietary deficiency. Is there a genetic cause? Other info I should know if the mother of one of my cats has been found to have restrictive cardiomyopathy?
    • lorkatz2004
      My cardiologist once told me that restrictive cardiopulmonary should be thought of as HCM in its severest form. For this type of cardiomyopathy, diet
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 17, 2012
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        My cardiologist once told me that restrictive cardiopulmonary should be thought of as HCM in its severest form. For this type of cardiomyopathy, diet deficiency is not the cause of it...........possibly you maybe thinking of DCM?? That is caused by taurine deficiency. Here is some info on RCM -





        Restrictive Cardiomyopathy in Cats



        A cat's heart is composed of four chambers: the top two chambers are the left and right atria and the bottom two chambers are the left and right ventricles. The valves of the heart are located between the left atrium and the left ventricle (the mitral valve), between the right atrium and the right ventricle (the tricuspid valve), from the left ventricle to the aorta (the main artery of the body, the valve of which is the aortic valve), and between the right ventricle to the main pulmonary artery (the pulmonary, or lung valve).



        Cardiomyopathy is the medical term for disease of the heart muscle. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is a disease in which the muscle is stiff and does not expand, such that blood cannot fill the ventricles normally. Restrictive cardiomyopathy in cats is characterized by abnormal filling of the chambers of the heart (known as diastolic dysfunction), severe atrial enlargement, normal left ventricular wall thickness and variable abnormal pumping of the heart (known as systolic dysfunction). Scar tissue of the heart muscle layer may be present. Other heart-muscle disorders, including inflammatory or immune-mediated diseases, may also be present.


        Symptoms and Types



        Lethargy
        Poor appetite and weight loss
        Fainting
        Impaired movement or paralysis
        Some cats are asymptomatic
        Difficult breathing
        Fast breathing
        Open mouth breathing
        Pale mucous membranes
        Abdominal distention


        Causes



        Unknown
        Suspected:
        Inflammation of the heart muscle
        Inflammation of the heart muscle and inner lining of the heart
        Parasites in the heart
        Thickening of the heart muscle with a heart attack
        Diffuse small vessel disease and other causes of inadequate oxygen to the heart




        Cathy






        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "k_humphrey" <kit@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was not able to find a document that discussed this.
        >
        > My specific question is about cause. All I had ever heard was dietary deficiency. Is there a genetic cause? Other info I should know if the mother of one of my cats has been found to have restrictive cardiomyopathy?
        >
      • Cheryl
        That is my understanding as well ~ that RCM is end-stage HCM. My Vizzy was healthy one minute (it seems like) and diagnosed with severe RCM the next. He was
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 17, 2012
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          That is my understanding as well ~ that RCM is end-stage HCM. My Vizzy was
          healthy one minute (it seems like) and diagnosed with severe RCM the next.
          He was never officially diagnosed with HCM. His mother had HCM and so did
          one sister, and a few other family members died unexpectedly but were never
          necropsied, so we don't know for sure what was going on. Based on genetics,
          it seems likely their deaths were probably cardiac-related, too.

          HCM can and does progress to RCM, but some HCM never does progress that far,
          and some cats with RCM were never diagnosed with HCM. Makes it all the more
          complicated.

          Cheryl & angel Vizzy

          -----Original Message-----
          From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of lorkatz2004
          Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 11:49 AM
          To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [FH] Re: I am looking for information about RESTRICTIVE
          cardiomyopathy


          My cardiologist once told me that restrictive cardiopulmonary should be
          thought of as HCM in its severest form. For this type of cardiomyopathy,
          diet deficiency is not the cause of it...........possibly you maybe thinking
          of DCM?? That is caused by taurine deficiency. Here is some info on RCM -





          Restrictive Cardiomyopathy in Cats



          A cat's heart is composed of four chambers: the top two chambers are the
          left and right atria and the bottom two chambers are the left and right
          ventricles. The valves of the heart are located between the left atrium and
          the left ventricle (the mitral valve), between the right atrium and the
          right ventricle (the tricuspid valve), from the left ventricle to the aorta
          (the main artery of the body, the valve of which is the aortic valve), and
          between the right ventricle to the main pulmonary artery (the pulmonary, or
          lung valve).



          Cardiomyopathy is the medical term for disease of the heart muscle.
          Restrictive cardiomyopathy is a disease in which the muscle is stiff and
          does not expand, such that blood cannot fill the ventricles normally.
          Restrictive cardiomyopathy in cats is characterized by abnormal filling of
          the chambers of the heart (known as diastolic dysfunction), severe atrial
          enlargement, normal left ventricular wall thickness and variable abnormal
          pumping of the heart (known as systolic dysfunction). Scar tissue of the
          heart muscle layer may be present. Other heart-muscle disorders, including
          inflammatory or immune-mediated diseases, may also be present.


          Symptoms and Types



          Lethargy
          Poor appetite and weight loss
          Fainting
          Impaired movement or paralysis
          Some cats are asymptomatic
          Difficult breathing
          Fast breathing
          Open mouth breathing
          Pale mucous membranes
          Abdominal distention


          Causes



          Unknown
          Suspected:
          Inflammation of the heart muscle
          Inflammation of the heart muscle and inner lining of the heart
          Parasites in the heart
          Thickening of the heart muscle with a heart attack
          Diffuse small vessel disease and other causes of inadequate oxygen
          to the heart




          Cathy






          --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "k_humphrey" <kit@...> wrote:
          >
          > I was not able to find a document that discussed this.
          >
          > My specific question is about cause. All I had ever heard was dietary
          deficiency. Is there a genetic cause? Other info I should know if the
          mother of one of my cats has been found to have restrictive cardiomyopathy?
          >




          ------------------------------------

          Your reply will go to the author of this message. If you feel your reply
          will benefit the entire group, please change the "To:" line to
          feline-heart@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
        • Cheryl
          I should also add that if the mother of your cat has RCM, then chances are there is a hereditary component involved. RCM is not caused by dietary
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 17, 2012
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            I should also add that if the mother of your cat has RCM, then chances are
            there is a hereditary component involved. RCM is not caused by dietary
            insufficiency. It could, in theory, be caused by a secondary factor such as
            hypertension, which also is true for HCM. However, secondary factors are
            few and far between compared to genetics.

            If RCM is indeed a severe form of HCM, then your kitty has a 50/50 chance of
            developing either HCM or RCM. Still, the genetics are complicated. Vizzy
            didn't develop RCM until he was 9 years old, but he had a sister die of the
            disease when she was 5. His mother wasn't diagnosed with HCM until she was
            11, although it's possible she had the disease for many years and no one
            knew. So even if a parent is diagnosed at a late age, a child may develop
            the disease much earlier and much more (or less) severe than the parent.
            And of course since it's a 50/50 shot, some children never develop the
            disease at all.

            Cheryl


            -----Original Message-----
            From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of Cheryl
            Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 1:56 PM
            To: Feline-Heart@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [FH] Re: I am looking for information about RESTRICTIVE
            cardiomyopathy

            That is my understanding as well ~ that RCM is end-stage HCM. My Vizzy was
            healthy one minute (it seems like) and diagnosed with severe RCM the next.
            He was never officially diagnosed with HCM. His mother had HCM and so did
            one sister, and a few other family members died unexpectedly but were never
            necropsied, so we don't know for sure what was going on. Based on genetics,
            it seems likely their deaths were probably cardiac-related, too.

            HCM can and does progress to RCM, but some HCM never does progress that far,
            and some cats with RCM were never diagnosed with HCM. Makes it all the more
            complicated.

            Cheryl & angel Vizzy

            -----Original Message-----
            From: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com [mailto:feline-heart@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of lorkatz2004
            Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 11:49 AM
            To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [FH] Re: I am looking for information about RESTRICTIVE
            cardiomyopathy


            My cardiologist once told me that restrictive cardiopulmonary should be
            thought of as HCM in its severest form. For this type of cardiomyopathy,
            diet deficiency is not the cause of it...........possibly you maybe thinking
            of DCM?? That is caused by taurine deficiency. Here is some info on RCM -





            Restrictive Cardiomyopathy in Cats



            A cat's heart is composed of four chambers: the top two chambers are the
            left and right atria and the bottom two chambers are the left and right
            ventricles. The valves of the heart are located between the left atrium and
            the left ventricle (the mitral valve), between the right atrium and the
            right ventricle (the tricuspid valve), from the left ventricle to the aorta
            (the main artery of the body, the valve of which is the aortic valve), and
            between the right ventricle to the main pulmonary artery (the pulmonary, or
            lung valve).



            Cardiomyopathy is the medical term for disease of the heart muscle.
            Restrictive cardiomyopathy is a disease in which the muscle is stiff and
            does not expand, such that blood cannot fill the ventricles normally.
            Restrictive cardiomyopathy in cats is characterized by abnormal filling of
            the chambers of the heart (known as diastolic dysfunction), severe atrial
            enlargement, normal left ventricular wall thickness and variable abnormal
            pumping of the heart (known as systolic dysfunction). Scar tissue of the
            heart muscle layer may be present. Other heart-muscle disorders, including
            inflammatory or immune-mediated diseases, may also be present.


            Symptoms and Types



            Lethargy
            Poor appetite and weight loss
            Fainting
            Impaired movement or paralysis
            Some cats are asymptomatic
            Difficult breathing
            Fast breathing
            Open mouth breathing
            Pale mucous membranes
            Abdominal distention


            Causes



            Unknown
            Suspected:
            Inflammation of the heart muscle
            Inflammation of the heart muscle and inner lining of the heart
            Parasites in the heart
            Thickening of the heart muscle with a heart attack
            Diffuse small vessel disease and other causes of inadequate oxygen
            to the heart




            Cathy






            --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "k_humphrey" <kit@...> wrote:
            >
            > I was not able to find a document that discussed this.
            >
            > My specific question is about cause. All I had ever heard was dietary
            deficiency. Is there a genetic cause? Other info I should know if the
            mother of one of my cats has been found to have restrictive cardiomyopathy?
            >




            ------------------------------------

            Your reply will go to the author of this message. If you feel your reply
            will benefit the entire group, please change the "To:" line to
            feline-heart@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links






            ------------------------------------

            Your reply will go to the author of this message. If you feel your reply
            will benefit the entire group, please change the "To:" line to
            feline-heart@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
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