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RE: [FH] plan for an emergency...

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  • Judi Levens
    yes, because we were in Mexico for 6 months a year with virtually no vet access, I asked my vet for and he perscribed butorphenol and extra lasix. Both things
    Message 1 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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      yes, because we were in Mexico for 6 months a year with virtually no vet access, I asked my vet for and he perscribed butorphenol and extra lasix. Both things came in handy...I used the butorphenol twice, when Max had a (minor) clot) and when he was passing. It's for pain and relaxes them also (the Mexican vet said it was like morphine.) I used the extra lasix when he threw the clot. When he threw the clot he was Ok the following morning, and I credit both of these meds for that somewhat, because he got very nervous when he realized something was wrong (probably remembering his 48 hours in emergency with oxygen) and the butorphenol put him to sleep while the lasix and aspirin and natto worked and his body recovered. I would ask for these two things and instructions on how to use. Good luck...Judi and Angel Max




      To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
      From: joeychloe@...
      Date: Wed, 2 May 2012 03:46:46 +0000
      Subject: [FH] plan for an emergency...


























      does anyone know the best plan for an emergency for a cat with hcm if they need to go to the emergency hospital and it is 15 minutes away? the only one i have come up with is to buy an oxygen mask and request medication from his cardiologist such as lasix (or something more effective for emergencies) to buy me some time to get to the hospital...all suggestions are so welcome :)


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jim Sinclair
      ... Clipsy s cardiologist gave me a kind of decision tree about what to do if her breathing rate (sustained, not just during excitement or emphatic purring)
      Message 2 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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        On Tue, May 1, 2012 at 11:46 PM, joeychloe <joeychloe@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > does anyone know the best plan for an emergency for a cat with hcm if they
        > need to go to the emergency hospital and it is 15 minutes away?

        Clipsy's cardiologist gave me a kind of decision tree about what to do
        if her breathing rate (sustained, not just during excitement or
        emphatic purring) was over 40 per minute. I don't have the piece of
        paper handy anymore because Clipsy died last summer, but I do recall
        that I was supposed to do one thing if her breathing was "labored" in
        addition to being fast, a different thing if fast but not labored, and
        the most urgent emergency would be if there was open-mouthed breathing
        or gasping for breath. In one case I was told just to call the vet for
        guidance before giving any meds, in another case I was told to
        administer an extra dose of Lasix and then call the vet for further
        instruction, and I'm pretty sure that the instruction for open-mouthed
        or gasping breathing was "administer Lasix if possible then transport
        to hospital immediately for IV Lasix."

        If your cat is already on Lasix you should have a supply of that on
        hand, so the thing to do is ask your vet for instructions about how to
        determine if your cat needs an extra dose and how much to administer
        under what circumstances. Then do what I did while Clipsy was
        alive--write that information in large print in decision-tree format,
        and post it somewhere prominent in your home (I had mine on the
        refrigerator) where you can easily find it in a hurry.

        Another thing you probably want to do is ask your vet for a preloaded
        syringe of buprenorphine or something similar, and clear concise
        instructions for how and when to use it. If your cat should throw a
        clot, he will be in excruciating pain. If you have an emergency pain
        shot on hand, you can give him that to relieve the pain while you're
        on the way to the hospital.

        Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
        www.jimsinclair.org
        http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
      • Westgold
        Jim, I want to sincerely thank you for staying on this list even after you lost Clipsy. The experience you have is invaluable to others. I keep hoping you
        Message 3 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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          Jim, I want to sincerely thank you for staying on this list even after you lost Clipsy. The experience you have is invaluable to others.

          I keep hoping you will post her photo and memorial on our site http://www.AngelKitties.com -- we'd love to see her, and learn how you met, etc. All kitties are welcome, no matter how long they've been in heaven, and even if they did not have heart disease. My soul-kitty Pooh is there, he died of a brain tumor. Please visit to read about our little angels.

          take care -- Michelle & Tigger Too in Toronto

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kathleen King
          I don t have my instruction sheet any longer since Danny died, but I was actually given that before he had CHF.  I was to use it if he had a sudden change in
          Message 4 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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            I don't have my instruction sheet any longer since Danny died, but I was actually given that before he had CHF.  I was to use it if he had a sudden change in cardiac symptoms.  I believe it was a way to buy time since I live in the mountains and it is 45 minute to an hour to the emergency vet.  Washington State University mentions it as a possible medication for pets with heart disease, but I have not researched it and I did not used it for Danny. 
            It does dialate the blood vessels and in an emergency can help with both pulmonary edema and pulmonary effusion.
             
             
             
            From: Westgold <westgold@...>
            To: Kathleen King <katn3kits@...>; feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 12:16 AM
            Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...


             
            Hi -- I never heard of giving a kitty nitroglycerin -- under what circumstances did he say you would use it?
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Kathleen King
            To: joeychloe ; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 11:59 PM
            Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...

            With Danny, my vet helped me develop an emergency plan and gave me some emergency meds including nitroglycerin paste and injectable lasix. When he was on Enalapril I was also suppose to give an extra dose of that if there was ever an emergency or if he even started acting like he was having problems. I live even further from the vet and the emergency hospital so that was always a fear of mine.

            I didn't know you could get oxygen without a doctor's order.

            ________________________________
            From: joeychloe <joeychloe@...>
            To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, May 1, 2012 9:46 PM
            Subject: [FH] plan for an emergency...

            does anyone know the best plan for an emergency for a cat with hcm if they need to go to the emergency hospital and it is 15 minutes away? the only one i have come up with is to buy an oxygen mask and request medication from his cardiologist such as lasix (or something more effective for emergencies) to buy me some time to get to the hospital...all suggestions are so welcome :)

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          • Westgold
            Wow, this sounds like something we all could have on hand. Especially for those whose cats have had fluid on the lungs previously. I hope you have a chance
            Message 5 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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              Wow, this sounds like something we all could have on hand. Especially for those whose cats have had fluid on the lungs previously. I hope you have a chance to do a little research on this and its exact uses. Has anyone else been given nitroglycerin for their cats?
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Kathleen King
              To: Westgold ; feline-heart
              Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 1:51 PM
              Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...


              I don't have my instruction sheet any longer since Danny died, but I was actually given that before he had CHF. I was to use it if he had a sudden change in cardiac symptoms. I believe it was a way to buy time since I live in the mountains and it is 45 minute to an hour to the emergency vet. Washington State University mentions it as a possible medication for pets with heart disease, but I have not researched it and I did not used it for Danny.
              It does dialate the blood vessels and in an emergency can help with both pulmonary edema and pulmonary effusion.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lisa
              We re very fortunate in that there s a 24 hour emergency hospital about 5 minutes away. Aside from having emergency meds, here s some things we have on hand
              Message 6 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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                We're very fortunate in that there's a 24 hour emergency hospital about 5
                minutes away.

                Aside from having emergency meds, here's some things we have on hand for
                each cat, not just the sick ones:

                - Binder with copies of all medical records. Bloodwork, rabies
                vaccinations, even receipts for last vet visit (they often have the
                animal's weight history). We also have the microchip information in the
                binder for each cat.

                - Written record of meds any of them are taking or have taken in the recent
                past, including supplements. It's very important to note if a cat had an
                adverse reaction to any of them. One of my kitties has a seizure disorder,
                and does not react well to phenobarbital. You can tell them, but it helps
                to have it written down.

                - I keep a ziplock bag in the medicine cabinet so I can put any meds in it
                for the relevant cat for the trip to the hospital. This is especially
                helpful if you do live some distance away -- always bring the meds with
                you. It's especially important if your cat is getting a compounded med, or
                a human med, neither of which they may have on hand.

                Lisa


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              • MKGMT@aol.com
                Wanted to share some good news. My ragdoll, Jazzie (aka Jasmine Rose), was diagnosed with HCM 2 years ago at 4 1/2 years of age. It was mild and thanks to
                Message 7 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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                  Wanted to share some good news. My ragdoll, Jazzie (aka Jasmine Rose), was diagnosed with HCM 2 years ago at 4 1/2 years of age. It was mild and thanks to the great ears of my awesome vet, we were sent to a local animal cardiologist for her first echo. She had mild thickening of her heart's walls, but due to her young age and being a purebred (Dr's words) he recommended that we treat her with a small daily dose of atenolol, which we did.


                  Last year's recheck showed a very slight increase in thickening. Yesterday's echo showed a DECREASE in the thickening from her FIRST echo. He said that if she came in today, he would not recommend treatment at this point. But seeing how she improved because of the treatment, we are continuing with the atenolol. Jazzie also lost 3 pounds this year. She was a big ragdoll, but is now much smaller. All her doctors think that she looks awesome. I am very grateful.


                  Melinda






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                • Laurie Stead
                  Hi Judi, Interesting to read about using butorphenol....   You wrote: It s for pain and relaxes them also (the Mexican vet said it was like morphine.) and
                  Message 8 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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                    Hi Judi,

                    Interesting to read about using butorphenol....   You wrote: "It's for pain and relaxes them also (the Mexican vet said it
                    was like morphine.)" and "put him to sleep".  I recently posted to the group that Boo's cardiologist wants me to give this to her before her next appt to help relax her as she gets very stressed.  The cardiologist used the phrase "to take the edge off" but It sounds much stronger by your description.  Someone in the group had replied that they would be surprised if it did anything of the sort.   Now I am confused by what to expect.  Do you remember the dosage you gave Max?

                    Thanks!
                    Laurie




                    --- On Wed, 5/2/12, Judi Levens <casaobelisco@...> wrote:

                    From: Judi Levens <casaobelisco@...>
                    Subject: RE: [FH] plan for an emergency...
                    To: joeychloe@..., feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, May 2, 2012, 9:59 AM


                    yes, because we were in Mexico for 6 months a year with virtually no vet access, I asked my vet for and he perscribed butorphenol and extra lasix.  Both things came in handy...I used the butorphenol twice, when Max had a (minor) clot) and when he was passing.  It's for pain and relaxes them also (the Mexican vet said it was like morphine.)  I used the extra lasix when he threw the clot.  When he threw the clot he was Ok the following morning, and I credit both of these meds for that somewhat, because he got very nervous when he realized something was wrong (probably remembering his 48 hours in emergency with oxygen) and the butorphenol put him to sleep while the lasix and aspirin and natto worked and his body recovered.  I would ask for these two things and instructions on how to use.  Good luck...Judi and Angel Max




                    To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                    From: joeychloe@...
                    Date: Wed, 2 May 2012 03:46:46 +0000
                    Subject: [FH] plan for an emergency...




















                     


                       
                         
                         
                          does anyone know the best plan for an emergency for a cat with hcm if they need to go to the emergency hospital and it is 15 minutes away?  the only one i have come up with is to buy an oxygen mask and request medication from his cardiologist such as lasix (or something more effective for emergencies) to buy me some time to get to the hospital...all suggestions are so welcome :)





                       
                         

                       
                       






                                                

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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                  • Kathleen King
                    Here are a couple of links I have found all talking about giving Nitroglycerin to cats in a CHF emergency:  
                    Message 9 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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                      Here are a couple of links I have found all talking about giving Nitroglycerin to cats in a CHF emergency:
                       
                      http://maxshouse.com/Cardiology/myocardial_diseases_of_the_cat.htm
                      http://zimmer-foundation.org/sch/ajd.html
                       
                      There appears to be a lot of mention of it's use in cases of acute pulmonary edema, given with lasix when a cat is hospitalized.  There were a couple of PDF's about it too, but I could not always determine how recent articles were written.


                      ________________________________
                      From: Westgold <westgold@...>
                      To: Kathleen King <katn3kits@...>; feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 2:41 PM
                      Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...


                      
                      Wow, this sounds like something we all could have on hand.  Especially for those whose cats have had fluid on the lungs previously.  I hope you have a chance to do a little research on this and its exact uses.  Has anyone else been given nitroglycerin for their cats?   
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      >From: Kathleen King
                      >To: Westgold ; feline-heart
                      >Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 1:51 PM
                      >Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...
                      >
                      >
                      >I don't have my instruction sheet any longer since Danny died, but I was actually given that before he had CHF.  I was to use it if he had a sudden change in cardiac symptoms.  I believe it was a way to buy time since I live in the mountains and it is 45 minute to an hour to the emergency vet.  Washington State University mentions it as a possible medication for pets with heart disease, but I have not researched it and I did not used it for Danny. 
                      >It does dialate the blood vessels and in an emergency can help with both pulmonary edema and pulmonary effusion.


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • acrocat@rocketmail.com
                      Re: nitroprusside ... Some cardiologists don t use it anymore in animals because they think it does not absorb transdermally. If it does absorb transdermally,
                      Message 10 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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                        Re: nitroprusside

                        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Westgold" <westgold@...> wrote:
                        > Wow, this sounds like something we all could have on hand. Especially for those whose cats have had fluid on the lungs previously. I hope you have a chance to do a little research on this and its exact uses. Has anyone else been given nitroglycerin for their cats?

                        Some cardiologists don't use it anymore in animals because they think it does not absorb transdermally. If it does absorb transdermally, it can cause a frightening drop in blood pressure -- animals on IV nitroprusside have their BP monitored constantly because its effect on BP can be so strong.

                        Personally, if my cat was in bad enough shape that I thought he needed nitro before we got to the ER, he'd be in bad enough shape that I'd be too nervous about his BP to try it. Cats and dogs in a CHF crisis can be hypotensive and this is life-threatening. I think getting to the ER is the important thing. If you live more than 30 min away, it's good to have a plan, but apart from those cases, just getting there as fast as you can while still being safe is the most important thing.
                      • acrocat@rocketmail.com
                        ... It was I who said that I d be surprised if butorphanol did anything. It is not like morphine -- it is a weak pain medication. Back in the olden days (5-10
                        Message 11 of 22 , May 2, 2012
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                          --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Laurie Stead <kittykatwhiskas@...> wrote:
                          > Interesting to read about using butorphenol....   You wrote: "It's for pain and relaxes them also (the Mexican vet said it
                          > was like morphine.)"

                          It was I who said that I'd be surprised if butorphanol did anything. It is not like morphine -- it is a weak pain medication. Back in the olden days (5-10 years ago), butorphanol was widely used as a pain medication. Some older-school vets still use it. It is not nearly as effective as other opioids, so everyone needs to make sure their dog or cat is getting more than butorphanol if they are having surgery or in pain for another reason.

                          Among veterinary anesthesiologists, butorphanol is most used for its sedative effects when used in combination with other medications. Among other vet specialists, it is often used as a cough medication in dogs with chronic cough.

                          If you are concerned, Laurie, can you just give the butorphanol one day at home and see? Do you have enough for two doses?
                        • Main Moulu
                          Message 12 of 22 , May 3, 2012
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                            ------------------------------
                            On Wed, May 2, 2012 8:51 PM AST (Arabian) Kathleen King wrote:

                            >I don't have my instruction sheet any longer since Danny died, but I was actually given that before he had CHF.  I was to use it if he had a sudden change in cardiac symptoms.  I believe it was a way to buy time since I live in the mountains and it is 45 minute to an hour to the emergency vet.  Washington State University mentions it as a possible medication for pets with heart disease, but I have not researched it and I did not used it for Danny. 
                            >It does dialate the blood vessels and in an emergency can help with both pulmonary edema and pulmonary effusion.



                            >From: Westgold <westgold@...>
                            >To: Kathleen King <katn3kits@...>; feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                            >Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 12:16 AM
                            >Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...
                            >
                            >

                            >Hi -- I never heard of giving a kitty nitroglycerin -- under what circumstances did he say you would use it?
                            >----- Original Message -----
                            >From: Kathleen King
                            >To: joeychloe ; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                            >Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 11:59 PM
                            >Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...
                            >
                            >With Danny, my vet helped me develop an emergency plan and gave me some emergency meds including nitroglycerin paste and injectable lasix. When he was on Enalapril I was also suppose to give an extra dose of that if there was ever an emergency or if he even started acting like he was having problems. I live even further from the vet and the emergency hospital so that was always a fear of mine.
                            >
                            >I didn't know you could get oxygen without a doctor's order.
                            >
                            >________________________________
                            >From: joeychloe <joeychloe@...>
                            >To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                            >Sent: Tuesday, May 1, 2012 9:46 PM
                            >Subject: [FH] plan for an emergency...
                            >
                            >does anyone know the best plan for an emergency for a cat with hcm if they need to go to the emergency hospital and it is 15 minutes away? the only one i have come up with is to buy an oxygen mask and request medication from his cardiologist such as lasix (or something more effective for emergencies) to buy me some time to get to the hospital...all suggestions are so welcome :)
                            >
                            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                          • elfinmyst@aol.com
                            Hi Melinda That s really good news and great for Jazzie. Give her a big hug for me and I think it s good she keeps on the atenolol. Cats caught early seem to
                            Message 13 of 22 , May 3, 2012
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                              Hi Melinda

                              That's really good news and great for Jazzie. Give her a big hug for me and
                              I think it's good she keeps on the atenolol. Cats caught early seem to do
                              well on that.

                              Lyn:)

                              _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Judi Levens
                              Hi: I wonder if maybe I have the name wrong...it s been over a year since Max passed and maybe I am forgetting, but I thought that was the name. What I had
                              Message 14 of 22 , May 3, 2012
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                                Hi: I wonder if maybe I have the name wrong...it's been over a year since Max passed and maybe I am forgetting, but I thought that was the name. What I had came in glass ampules with a needle to administer. The vet in Mexico said that he couldn't even perscribe that drug because it was like Morphine and he didn't have authority to use it. Can you think of something else which sounds similar and would come in that packaging? I had 3 ampules in a package. I know that it knocked Max out...hope I'm not leading you wrong...Judi and Angel Max and Tucker



                                To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                                From: acrocat@...
                                Date: Thu, 3 May 2012 05:38:19 +0000
                                Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...






























                                --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, Laurie Stead <kittykatwhiskas@...> wrote:

                                > Interesting to read about using butorphenol.... You wrote: "It's for pain and relaxes them also (the Mexican vet said it

                                > was like morphine.)"



                                It was I who said that I'd be surprised if butorphanol did anything. It is not like morphine -- it is a weak pain medication. Back in the olden days (5-10 years ago), butorphanol was widely used as a pain medication. Some older-school vets still use it. It is not nearly as effective as other opioids, so everyone needs to make sure their dog or cat is getting more than butorphanol if they are having surgery or in pain for another reason.



                                Among veterinary anesthesiologists, butorphanol is most used for its sedative effects when used in combination with other medications. Among other vet specialists, it is often used as a cough medication in dogs with chronic cough.



                                If you are concerned, Laurie, can you just give the butorphanol one day at home and see? Do you have enough for two doses?


















                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Kathleen King
                                As I said before - I beleive part of the reason I was given this is because I live so far away from the emergency vet.  The other things is, we knew Danny s
                                Message 15 of 22 , May 3, 2012
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                                  As I said before - I beleive part of the reason I was given this is because I live so far away from the emergency vet.  The other things is, we knew Danny's BP went up during emergencies. 
                                   
                                  I think it is really important to know your cat.  I considered the Nitro a life or death situation medication.  I did not use it because I was not in that situation. On the other hand, my brother-in-law found his cat collasped with very labored breathing and cyanotic gums and pads.  I think I would have used it if Danny had been like that.
                                   

                                  ________________________________
                                  From: "acrocat@..." <acrocat@...>
                                  To: feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 11:30 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...


                                   
                                  Re: nitroprusside

                                  --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Westgold" <westgold@...> wrote:
                                  > Wow, this sounds like something we all could have on hand. Especially for those whose cats have had fluid on the lungs previously. I hope you have a chance to do a little research on this and its exact uses. Has anyone else been given nitroglycerin for their cats?

                                  Some cardiologists don't use it anymore in animals because they think it does not absorb transdermally. If it does absorb transdermally, it can cause a frightening drop in blood pressure -- animals on IV nitroprusside have their BP monitored constantly because its effect on BP can be so strong.

                                  Personally, if my cat was in bad enough shape that I thought he needed nitro before we got to the ER, he'd be in bad enough shape that I'd be too nervous about his BP to try it. Cats and dogs in a CHF crisis can be hypotensive and this is life-threatening. I think getting to the ER is the important thing. If you live more than 30 min away, it's good to have a plan, but apart from those cases, just getting there as fast as you can while still being safe is the most important thing.




                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Jim Sinclair
                                  ... My Buttercup was like that. She would invariably pant, drool, and vomit when taken anywhere in the vehicle. Vets always thought she was acutely ill even
                                  Message 16 of 22 , May 3, 2012
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                                    On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 12:22 AM, Joanne Haeussinger <chmiss01@...> wrote:

                                    > I even put Feliway in her carrier. Do any of you have cats that get super nervous when going to the vet, and if so, how do you stop them from having such a reaction?

                                    My Buttercup was like that. She would invariably pant, drool, and
                                    vomit when taken anywhere in the vehicle. Vets always thought she was
                                    acutely ill even when I just took her for routine checkups and
                                    vaccinations.

                                    I eventually learned to spray Feliway on a pad and put it into her
                                    carrier at least half an hour before I put the cat into the carrier
                                    and took her into the vehicle. That 30-60 minutes seemed to make a
                                    huge difference in the effectiveness of the Feliway, so she was
                                    finally able to travel without panic and puking.

                                    Jim Sinclair  jisincla@...
                                    www.jimsinclair.org
                                    http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com
                                  • Westgold
                                    Great advice. My vet also told me that I could give Tigger a double dose of the atenolol before any really stressful event. It is not a sedative, but helps
                                    Message 17 of 22 , May 3, 2012
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                                      Great advice. My vet also told me that I could give Tigger a double dose of the atenolol before any really stressful event. It is not a sedative, but helps with the heart rhythm. But I wouldn't do this unless my vet approved -- so check with yours ahead of time.
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: Jim Sinclair
                                      To: Joanne Haeussinger
                                      Cc: joeychloe ; feline-heart@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Thursday, May 03, 2012 2:03 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [FH] plan for an emergency...



                                      On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 12:22 AM, Joanne Haeussinger <chmiss01@...> wrote:

                                      > I even put Feliway in her carrier. Do any of you have cats that get super nervous when going to the vet, and if so, how do you stop them from having such a reaction?

                                      My Buttercup was like that. She would invariably pant, drool, and
                                      vomit when taken anywhere in the vehicle. Vets always thought she was
                                      acutely ill even when I just took her for routine checkups and
                                      vaccinations.

                                      I eventually learned to spray Feliway on a pad and put it into her
                                      carrier at least half an hour before I put the cat into the carrier
                                      and took her into the vehicle. That 30-60 minutes seemed to make a
                                      huge difference in the effectiveness of the Feliway, so she was
                                      finally able to travel without panic and puking.

                                      Jim Sinclair jisincla@...
                                      www.jimsinclair.org
                                      http://moosepuppy.petfinder.com




                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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