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Re: [FAN-H] My cat aspirated bath water and is now breathing funny, what do I do? -

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  • Westgold
    Well, if the kitten s head isn t held tightly enough, of course there could be brain damage or whiplash, etc. But if you hold the kitten s head tightly
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 5, 2012
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      Well, if the kitten's head isn't held tightly enough, of course there could be brain damage or whiplash, etc. But if you hold the kitten's head tightly between the 4 fingers on each hand, the thumbs holding the rest of the kitten tight (wrapped in a washrag if that helps you keep a grip), there is no danger. The 4 kittens I saved this way were all perfectly fine and are all still living well. I see the techs on TV sometimes trying to suction the fluid out of the babies, I even saw some cheetah cubs born through a c-section last week, and they just suctioned them. I kept yelling at them SWING THEM, SWING THEM! The suctioning is too slow, they were fighting to keep the tube in the nose, etc. The swing is instant and forces the water out instantly. All those cheetah babies died. If I had been there, they wouldn't have, darn it!!!
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Alexandra de Guzman
      To: Westgold
      Cc: fanciershealth@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2012 1:40 PM
      Subject: Re: [FAN-H] My cat aspirated bath water and is now breathing funny, what do I do? -


      Well I was at the vets recently watching and participating in a c section..I started to swing a baby and the techs said we do NOT do that anymore. Asked why they said it causes stress to the organs and brain. Have been breeding for 25 years... So that is not advisable now a days I guess.. I can understand the logic in that..They suctioned the newborns for 30 to 45 minutes if there was shallow breathing..
      New to me..These are reproduction specialists..So I think they would know..Interesting...
      Alex

      On Apr 5, 2012, at 8:51 AM, Westgold wrote:



      I just noticed this discussion. When a newborn is not breathing or having trouble breathing, we assume fluid in the lungs. We hold the kitten very carefully in our hands, tightly supporting every part of the kitten esp the head, with the head at our fingertips. Then we swing the kitten downward, between your legs, to use gravity to force the fluid out. I have been able to revive 4 kittens who weren't breathing this way. You may have to swing several times, and with greater force each time, but if there is fluid in the lungs, this will work most of the time. If I had an adult cat who I suspected got water into her lungs, I would do the same thing. Wrap the cat in a towel quickly and tightly like a papoose, then pick him up and hold him upside down -- swing him downward head first several times to force the water out. You want to get as much of the water OUT as possible, especially if there is soap in it, not wait days or weeks for the body to absorb it. That might cause permanent lung damage.






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • acrocat@rocketmail.com
      I think this was sent to the heart list in error? But I ll comment anyway :) The cat who aspirated bath water needs to go to the ER and get chest x-rays, and
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 5, 2012
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        I think this was sent to the heart list in error? But I'll comment anyway :)

        The cat who aspirated bath water needs to go to the ER and get chest x-rays, and I'd even hospitalize overnight for observation. Irritants to the lungs can cause non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and death, and the edema may not develop for many hours. The fact that the bathwater might have traces of soap makes it more likely that this might happen, so I hope that kitty got to the ER.

        Regarding the swinging of neonates ...

        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Westgold" <westgold@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well, if the kitten's head isn't held tightly enough, of course there could be brain damage or whiplash, etc. But if you hold the kitten's head tightly between the 4 fingers on each hand, the thumbs holding the rest of the kitten tight (wrapped in a washrag if that helps you keep a grip), there is no danger.

        That's a pretty bold statement! This swung puppy (swung by an experienced person who stabilized his head) would beg to differ:

        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19501346
        Top Companion Anim Med. 2009 May;24(2):100-3.
        Intracranial trauma in a dog due to being "swung" at birth.
        Grundy SA, Liu SM, Davidson AP.

        >The 4 kittens I saved this way were all perfectly fine and are all still living well.

        Unfortunately, a database of four kittens isn't evidence that it's safe. Theriogenologists who attend and consult on hundreds of births have found the practice to be unsafe. To see more on this subject:

        http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/vetmed/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=703814&sk=&date=&pageID=3

        Swinging can also cause stomach contents to come up, often giving a false sense of success and of course there's a chance that that fluid will be aspirated into the airway.

        That's OT, though, the more important thing is the kitty with breathing difficulty. I knew a Dachshund who went underwater --so briefly! -- during a hydrotherapy session and developed severe pulmonary edema the next day. Luckily the water wasn't soapy, as soap is extremely irritating. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is awful as it is not as responsive to Lasix (some specialists believe it shouldn't be used at all) and is associated with ARDS (acute resp. distress syndrome) which is often fatal :( Hope this kitty did ok.

        Adriann
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