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Re: [FH] Lasix or Spironolactone

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  • Carol
    hi Jim, Here is some info on the three main diuretics that folks use from the WSU website. http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/cliented/cardiacDrugs.aspx I know that the
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 1, 2012
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      hi Jim,


      Here is some info on the three main diuretics that folks use from the WSU website.
      http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/cliented/cardiacDrugs.aspx


      I know that the Spironolactone is a potassium sparing one, but other than that, I'm not sure if it's better for the kidneys or not. I hope this helps.


      Carol and the gang




      Furosemide (Lasix, Disal, others)

      Furosemide is the diuretic ("water pill") most often used to promote the loss of excess fluid in patients with congestive heart failure. The dosage varies depending on the clinical situation and the patient’s response, but generally the lowest dose that controls signs of congestion is used for chronic therapy. Signs of heart failure decompensation and congestion such as a persistent increase in resting respiratory rate or recurrence of cough may respond to an (often temporary) increase in furosemide dose. In most cases (check with your veterinarian first), if your pet has been doing well on heart failure medication but subsequently develops signs of congestion again, you can increase the dose or add an extra dose of furosemide for a day or so. If this becomes necessary, be sure to discuss each event with your veterinarian – reevaluation additional tests, and/or other therapy adjustments may be necessary.

      Adverse effects of furosemide are usually related to excessive fluid and/or electrolyte losses (especially potassium) resulting in dehydration and weakness.



      Spironolactone (Aldactone)

      Spironolactone is another diuretic that works by a different mechanism from furosemide. It is sometimes used in addition to furosemide in the treatment of chronic, refractory congestive heart failure. Adverse effects relate to excess potassium retention and stomach/intestinal upset. If used with an ACE inhibitor or oral potassium supplement, blood potassium must be monitored closely.




      Chlorthiazide (Diuril) or Hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril)

      These drugs are diuretics that are sometimes used with furosemide for refractory heart failure. Adverse effects are usually related to excessive fluid and/or electrolyte losses.




      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jim <jim64299@...>
      Subject: [FH] Lasix or Spironolactone





      Hello
      I was wondering if anybody could tell me which diuretic,lasix or spironolactone has the least damaging effect on the kidney.
      I noticed most cats use lasix to remove fluids but others use both,lasix and spironolactone .
      Why would you use both since they both have the same function
      Is one more effective then the other?
      Is one less dangerous to use or is one more effective.

      Thanks

      Jim














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    • acrocat@rocketmail.com
      Hi Jim ... Lasix is not toxic to kidneys. Kidney values go up on bloodwork in animals who are given Lasix because diuretics are dehydrating; this is called
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 1, 2012
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        Hi Jim

        --- In feline-heart@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jim64299@...> wrote:
        > I was wondering if anybody could tell me which diuretic,lasix or spironolactone has the least damaging effect on the kidney.

        Lasix is not toxic to kidneys. Kidney values go up on bloodwork in animals who are given Lasix because diuretics are dehydrating; this is called pre-renal azotemia. In an animal whose kidneys are healthy, the numbers would go back down if it were stopped (though animals in CHF can't stop their Lasix).

        > I noticed most cats use lasix to remove fluids but others use both,lasix and spironolactone .
        > Why would you use both since they both have the same function

        They are both diuretics but do not work the same way (have the same mechanism of action) in the body.

        > Is one more effective then the other?

        Lasix is much much much more effective. Spironolactone is usually added on after a cat has been in heart failure for some time, to give an extra boost of diuretic, but it is really rather a poor diuretic at best. It does not allow as much potassium to be peed out as Lasix does. Spironolactone could not be used alone as a treatment for CHF.

        Does this help?

        Adriann
      • elfinmyst@aol.com
        Hi Jim Lasix is a more effective diuretic. It is the best to use for fluid in the lungs and for cats in CHF. Because it dehydrates it can cause kidney values
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 2, 2012
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          Hi Jim

          Lasix is a more effective diuretic. It is the best to use for fluid in the
          lungs and for cats in CHF. Because it dehydrates it can cause kidney values
          to rise. Spiro is safer for the kidneys and more useful for fluid outside
          the lungs.

          Both are given together in CHF to remove as much fluid as possible and
          usually given with a potassium supplement to help replace that which has been
          lost.

          Lyn

          _www.myfurkids.co.uk_ (http://www.myfurkids.co.uk/)

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        • Jim Kelly
          Hello Carol   Thank you for the information. on furesomide and spironolactone.It will be very helpful :) Presently he is taking lasix ,about 10mg/day split
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 2, 2012
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            Hello Carol
              Thank you for the information. on furesomide and spironolactone.It will be very helpful :)
            Presently he is taking lasix ,about 10mg/day split into morning and evening,
            His BUN values have gone up a bit since he started the lasix, they will
            normal befire he went onit but his creatine has stayed normal  while
            taking lasix
            so I guess we'll just have to keep an eye on it.

            Thanks
            Jim

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          • Jim Kelly
            Thank you,Lyn... I was thinking of alternatives to lasix.Have you ever heard of dandelion leaf used  as a diuretic in cats ? Thanks [Non-text portions of this
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 2, 2012
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              Thank you,Lyn...
              I was thinking of alternatives to lasix.Have you ever heard of dandelion leaf used  as a diuretic in cats ?

              Thanks


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            • Carol
              hi Jim, I used to use dandelion leaf (root is typically used for liver disorders), on my angel Sweetie. It did help some, but it s not really potent enough to
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 2, 2012
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                hi Jim,

                I used to use dandelion leaf (root is typically used for liver disorders), on my angel Sweetie. It did help some, but it's not really potent enough to handle the kind of fluid that comes along with CHF kitties. I used a combination of dandelion leaf and lasix in the beginning of Sweetie's CHF, when it wasn't so bad, but as her condition progressed, we dropped the dandelion and just used the lasix.

                Dandelion isn't really any "safer" than the drugs as far as protection for the kidneys, because it's still a diuretic and will have the same effect on taking fluid out of the body that's needed for other organ functions.

                The only thing about dandelion is that it does have other nutrients in it that can be of benefit.


                Carol and the gang



                -----Original Message-----
                From: Jim Kelly <jim64299@...>
                To: feline-heart <feline-heart@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Mon, Jan 2, 2012 6:55 am
                Subject: [FH] Re: Lasix or Spironolactone





                Thank you,Lyn...
                I was thinking of alternatives to lasix.Have you ever heard of dandelion leaf used as a diuretic in cats ?

                Thanks

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









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              • joanne marbut
                Depending on the amount of fluid a cat is suspectible to collecting, lasix alone may not be enough. A cat may also need spironolactone not only as a diuretic
                Message 7 of 8 , Jan 2, 2012
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                  Depending on the amount of fluid a cat is suspectible to collecting, lasix alone may not be enough. A cat may also need spironolactone not only as a diuretic but also to help the body preserve potassium.  If the CBC/chem panel blood test shows a low level of potassium, around 4 or less, then a supplement might be needed. Normal range is 3.5-5 for cats.  My cat's blood potassium was 4.2 but the cardiologist-in order to warrant off any possible kidney issues since my cat's on lasix and spironolactone-suggested I give a supplement. I have been giving her half of a human potassium supplement (divided over three meal times) and her potassium level is now 4.5.  If you are trying to decide if your cat should have both, I would say both are beneficial. Good luck!

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